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Hiring the right people right

Hiring training
by

Paola Rossi

on 23 January 2016

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Transcript of Hiring the right people right

Job description
Develop an accurately written job description

Interviewing
Legal Do's and Don'ts
Identify the legal dos and don’ts of the interview process

GOAL!
Hiring the right people the right way!
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Develop behavioral-based interview questions that are linked to the required competencies identified in the job description
Understand and demonstrate the open, body and closing phases of an interview


Hiring the Right People
Let's start the presentation
How do we hire?
Job description activity

Q&A

What protected class(es) do these fall under?
Do you have any children?
Who do you live with?
How many kids do you have?
What are your child care arrangements?
To what clubs or associations do you belong?
How much sick leave did you take at your last job?
Do you work out regularly?
Is English your first language?
Is that an engagement ring?

What not to ask

You were just making conversation
You are in the same protected class
You didn’t mean anything by it
The applicant did not appear offended
The applicant brought the subject up

Its not OK just because…

Statements that may indicate a preference

When did you graduate?
Where do you live?
Congratulations! When are you due?
Are you Irish?
Are you a member of any associations?


Questions that might have adverse impact .....

What does your spouse/ boyfriend do?
To what church do you belong?
When is the baby due?
What happened to your leg?
What high school did you go to? What year did you graduate?
Will your childcare arrangements permit you to travel?

... more questions that you should not ask....

We DO NOT want to know if an applicant is in a
protected
class

It is NEVER relevant to the job

Having such knowledge subjects us to claims of discrimination

Possible Discrimination

Age
Race
Ethnic or national Origin
Nationality
Religion
Gender
Disability
Member of the traveling community
Marital Status
Sexual Orientation

We cannot discriminate based on…

Fair Employment Practices

Legal Dos & Don’ts

Probably or Definite “NO”
Thank the interviewee for their time
Indicate that you’re interviewing a number of people and you will notify if a second interview is necessary

Possible
Express interest without commitment
Tell the candidate when you will be in touch

Top Contender
Inform candidate of your high interest level
Do not make an on-the-spot offer
Inform candidate of selection timeline

Closing an Interview

The Body of the Interview

Welcome
Logistical information (build rapport, structure interview, etc.)
Cover structure of interview
Gather information (inquire about KSAs)
Give information (describe position and answer questions)
Close (set follow up)
Transition to work experience questions

Opening an Interview

Gain additional understanding of a candidate’s response to an initial question
Ask as many follow-up questions as you need to discover all the detailed
information
Ask frequent follow-up questions throughout the interview
Keep them focused on behaviors

Follow-Up Questions

Question Focus –
Reach for a S.T.A.R.

Ask for what occurred, why and how
The candidate provides insight into behaviors and motivators
Follow-up with a request for an example
“On your last job, what did you do particularly well?
Give me an example of those skills used.”
“What was your most difficult challenge in working on a conversion project? Why was it difficult?”

Self-Assessment Questions

Targeted Questions

Closed-ended Questions
When were you promoted to project manager?
What was your annual department budget?
Open-ended Questions
Give me an example of…
Describe how you handled…
What actions did you take…?
How did you solve…?

Examples: Closed and Open

Closed-ended questions
Can be answered with a brief response, typically “yes” or “no”
Useful for obtaining specific facts and confirming information
Open-ended questions
Ask for more comprehensive information, both general information
as well as detailed, specific behavioral examples

Closed and Open Questions

Put candidate at ease
Gain the candidate’s confidence
Show that you care about the interviewee
Demonstrate that it is a good organization
Get the candidate to talk about past job behavior

Rapport-Building Questions

The core competencies:
Are based on Webroot’s values and strategic goals
Represent any knowledge, skill or ability that can be shown to differentiate between superior and average performance on the job
Include Technical competencies
Include Leadership competencies

Job Descriptions Include Core Competencies

Interview and select for knowledge, skills and abilities, NOT duties:
This will ensure the right fit even if duties change
Most duties can be learned if KSAs are present
KSAs are transferable from position to position
Most leadership challenges are KSA driven
Employees who are difficult to manage often lack critical KSAs
KSAs are more difficult to alter than duties

Focus on Knowledge, Skills & Abilities (KSAs)

Establishes a common understanding of both job requirements and candidate requirements
Provides standard criteria for evaluating candidates
Can be used to establish performance standards for both new employees and current incumbents
Can be used as a reference point for performance appraisal

Benefits of a Job Description

Introduction
Job Descriptions
Behavior-Based Questions
Legal Dos and Don’ts
Role Play

Agenda

“High Maintenance” and require more management attention
Find yourself spending the majority of your time and energy on this person
and disconnected from your strong players
Find yourself and/or other team members spending a lot of time training
them on the basics
Time to productivity is slow
Find yourself feeling nervous about letting them interact with the customer
Find yourself covering or making excuses for them

Increased Management Time and Effort
Training Time and Costs
Customer Satisfaction
Competitive Advantage
Other Employee’s Productivity
Company Image
Fill-In Time
ROI
HR Time

What happens if we hire the wrong person for the wrong job?
What is the cost of a 'bad' hire?

Ignore it
Politely turn conversation back to relevant matters
Where applicable, focus on the job related aspects of the answer

What to do when an innocent question gets off track

Are you married?
Do you have children?
How old are you?
What is your sexual orientation?
What is your religion?

Questions you CANNOT ask

30 minutes

Team Exercise
Develop behavior-based questions
Include general, targeted and self-assessment
Identify 5-6 best questions and related competencies/behaviors.

Behavior-Based Question Activity

A candidate gives this response to your question,
“Yes, I managed external vendors in my last job.”

Examples:
On what type of projects did you use external vendors?
What results do you attribute to using external vendors?
What challenges did you encounter in using external vendors?
How did you overcome those challenges?

Examples: Follow-Up Questions

Invite the candidate to discuss a competency in general terms
Set the candidate at ease
“What did you like most about your last job?”
“Why were those activities your favorites?”
“How did your team work together?”

General Questions

Ask for specific examples
Can determine the candidate’s role and specific steps taken
to accomplish results
Are linked to the competencies critical to job performance
Can be closed ended or open ended

Behavior-Based Questions

Developing Effective Interview Questions

30 minutes

Team Exercise
Review Job Descriptions/Key Competencies
Provide feedback on any gaps or areas that may be improved
Take notes and modify per group suggestions
Report-outs of improvements made

Job Description Activity

Identify the job title and purpose
Outline the duties, functions and responsibilities of the job
Include the key accountabilities of position
Outline the knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) necessary for the job
Differentiate between required and desired KSAs related to the job

Effective Job Descriptions

The core competencies:
Are based on Webroot’s values and strategic goals
Represent any knowledge, skill or ability that can be shown to differentiate between superior and average performance on the job
Include Technical competencies
Include Leadership competencies


Job Descriptions Include Core Competencies

Source: Dr. John Sullivan, Professor and the HR Program Coordinator College of Business at San Francisco State University

Interview and select for knowledge, skills and abilities, NOT duties:
This will ensure the right fit even if duties change
Most duties can be learned if KSAs are present
KSAs are transferable from position to position
Most leadership challenges are KSA driven
Employees who are difficult to manage often lack critical KSAs
KSAs are more difficult to alter than duties


Focus on knowledge, skills and abilities

Identify the job title and purpose
Outline the duties, functions and responsibilities of the job
Include the key accountability of position
Outline the knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) necessary for the job
Differentiate between required and desired KSAs related to the job


Your name
Your title and department
Tell us about your worst or most bizarre interviewing experience

Introductions

Establishes a common understanding of both job requirements and candidate requirements
Provides standard criteria for evaluating candidates
Can be used to establish performance standards for both new employees and current incumbents
Can be used as a reference point to discuss employee's performance

Developing an effective job description

30 minutes

Purpose
To practice using interviewing skills in the full interview – open, body & close

Role Play

Interview Structure

Types of Open-Ended Questions

Candidate
Pretend to be candidate for their job description
Provide feedback

Observer
Timekeeper
Provide feedback

Interviewer
Practice interviewing
Reflect
Don’t over advocate
Behavior-based questions
Use your skills!

Interview Role Play

Derived from the work of Peter Senge, Chris Argryis and David Bohm

Tell/Share about perceptions and standards required

Ask about abilities and goals

Listen to the content and feeling of what the interviewee is saying

Advocate

Reflective
Listening

Strategy

The Communication Process:
Your Guide to a Successful Interview

Inquire

Interview Process

Effective job description
Team Exercise

Review Job Descriptions/Key Competencies
Provide feedback on any gaps or areas that may be improved
Take notes and modify per group suggestions
Report-outs of improvements made

Open-ended questions focusing on behavior are the ones to use to encourage the candidate to share the examples you want.

Three types of open-ended questions are:
General
Targeted
Self-Assessment

Focus on examples, specific types of situations or specific skills similar to what would be required

“Tell me about the last project you managed, and specifically about performance issues that you had to handle.”

“Tell me more how your team managed tight deadlines.”

When developing behavior-based questions,
consider the technical and interpersonal skills required for the job

Focus on:
Situations – what was happening at the time?
Tasks – what needed to be done?
Actions – what did the candidate do?
Results – what was the result or outcome?

This is where you gather the information necessary to determine whether or not the Interviewee meets the requirements of the job.

Most of your time here should be spent in the Inquire and Reflect Phases of the Communication Process

Focus on questions that will provide you with a good sense of:
Current Skills
Previous Experience

Comply with local employment laws
External equal treatment to all employees and applicants without regard to:
race, color, religion, national origin, gender (including pregnancy), sexual orientation, age, disability, marital/civil partnership status, or any other characteristic protected by law (i.e. disability and members of the traveler community)

Use merit and job-related criteria as the only basis for employment-related decisions

Implications that older people can’t change:
“You can’t teach an old dog new tricks”

Assumptions about abilities, i.e. Asians are good with numbers

Excessive concern/paternalism about applicant’s health/disability

Attempts to protect or shield women, i.e. apologizing for the use of curse words (you should not use curse words in the first place)

Identify job title and purpose
Outline job duties, functions, responsibilities
Include key accountabilities of position
Outline required and desired knowledge,
skills and abilities (KSAs) needed for the job

Identify questions that are linked to competencies critical to job performance

Questions should focus on:
Situations
Tasks
Actions
Results

Set your game plan for each of the phases of an interview
Opening
Rapport-building questions
Describe open position
Body
Questions regarding current skills / previous experience
Close
Prepare appropriate closing for Probable or Definite “NO”, Possible or Top Contender Candidates

Do Not consider non-job related issues, such as membership in a protected class
Do Not ask questions about Applicant’s membership In a protected class
Do Not make comments that show a preference

Inquire (Ask) about the interviewee’s abilities and goals
Reflect (Listen) the content and feeling of what the interviewee is saying
Advocate (Tell / Share) perceptions and standards an interviewee needs to meet

Develop Job Description
Identify Interview Questions
Plan The Interview
Consider Legal implications
Conduct the interview
Full transcript