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Lord Byron

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Petra Harding

on 11 April 2012

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Transcript of Lord Byron

The poem follows a simple ABABAB rhyme scheme. It turns into CD in the second stanza,
and EF in the third. “[Byron's] poetry was extremely popular during his lifetime, although some reviewers regarded both his personal life and his writing as immoral(Haerans 68).” On the other hand, Byron's personal experience plays a vital part in his most successful pieces. Lord Byron Life (George Gordon Noel Byron) The Work of Lord Byron Born: January 22nd, 1788
Nationality: English
Ethnic Background: Scottish
Died: April 19th 1824

Family Literary criticism: Lord Byron's parents split up when he was young but his father, Captain John "Mad Jack' Byron, continued to return to borrow money. Childhood Lord Byron was born with a birth defect that caused him a lot of mental and physical pain. Lord Byron learned nothing from his abusive mother. Instead, Lord Byron's attorney took him from his mother and sent him to Harrow School. Love It is believed that Lord Byron first started his "romantic" life when his nurse took advantage of him at the age of nine.
Lord Byron got most of his inspiration and education from Harrow school. He later went on to Trinity College but felt that Harrow school did more for him than the College did.

People he was with: -His nurse
-Mary Duff (cousin)
-Margaret Parker (cousin)
-John Edleston
-Mary Chaworth (Wife/cousin)
-Nameless married woman he met in Spain
-Lady Caroline Lamb who later stalked him
-Lady Oxford
-Lady Frances Webster
-Augusta Leigh (Half-sister)
- Anne Isabella Milbanke
-Claire Clairmont
-A Venetian Draper's wife
-A Roman Baker's wife
-Countess Teresa Guicciolo
-Possibly Loukas Chalandritsanos
It is never specified which woman he was talking about in "She walks in Beauty" and experts continue to speculate on the matter. There were plenty of women he had to choose from to write about, who became symbols of unattainable love. Lord Byron's first wife, Mary Chaworth, was his distant cousin and he spent most of his childhood in love with her before they got married. She was also engaged before marrying Byron instead. After having four affairs at the same time, Byron wanted to settle down and get married again. He proposed to and married Anne Isabella Milbanke, and then had a daughter named Augusta Ada. After Augsta Ada's birth, Anne left Bryon but never said why. Byron also had an affair with Claire Clairmont sometime before he fled England. She ended up having Byron's second daughter who was called Alba, by her mother, and Allegra by her father. She was born on January 12th 1817. Byron died while serving the Greek Army. He became ill and slipped into a coma. Legacy Love is a common theme in Byron's work. The Concept of love is stretched out into "unattainable beauty, unrequited love, [and ] forbidden love(George Gordon ... 1)," just to name a few. She Walks in Beauty
By Lord Byron, (George Gordon Noel Byron)
She walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that’s best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes;
Thus mellowed to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

One shade the more, one ray the less,
Had half impaired the nameless grace
Which waves in every raven tress,
Or softly lightens o’er her face;
Where thoughts serenely sweet express,
How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.

And on that cheek, and o’er that brow,
So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,
The smiles that win, the tints that glow,
But tell of days in goodness spent,
A mind at peace with all below,
A heart whose love is innocent! Poetic Analysis: (The Life of ..., 15) Catherine Gordon Lord Byron was three when his father died. His Uncle later passed away. This made the young Byron the sixth to hold the title of Lord Byron. Byron was in the middle of
his Latin class when he
heard the news. He cried. Lord Byron was heavily abused by his mother, and had to be taken away. Catherine Gordon He was driven to overcompensate in everything that he could do, that did not involve the use of his foot . From here, Lord Byron has romantic and sexual relationships with many boys at his school and many married women later on in his life. When he was older he ended up breaking up at least 4 marriages from sleeping with married women and having them follow him around on his travels. Later on, Byron was travelling with Countess Teresa, and Claire sent Allegra to live with Byron. Instead of taking Allegra with them, Teresa and Byron dropped Allegra off at a convent where she died the following April. She was only five. (The Life of George..., 15) (Byron, 1) (Byron, 1) (Byron, 1) (Lord Bryon, 1) (The Life of George..., 1) (The Life of George..., 1) (Byron, 1) (The Life of George...,
1-11) (The Life of George..., 1) (The Life of George...) (Lord Byron, 8) (Lord Byron, 7) (The Life of George..., 6) (The Life of George..., 9) (The Life of George...,11) Major Themes: Unrequited love
Sublime Beauty
Innocence Dark & Light Imagery Cloudless climes and starry skies (L2)
"And all that’s best of dark and bright (L3)
Meet in her aspect and her eyes ..." (L4)
Tender light (L5)
Heaven to gaudy day denies. (L6)
"One shade the more, one ray the less ..." (L7)
"... the tints that glow..." (L15)
Meter The poem is written in Iambic Tetrameter, and holds distinctive rhytmic properties. Metonymy "Which heaven to gaudy day denies." (L6)
"One shade the more, one ray the less ..." (L7) Metaphor Had half impaired the nameless grace (L8)
Which waves in every raven tress, (L9)
Or softly lightens o’er her face; (L10) How pure, how dear their dwelling-place. (L12) Personification And on that cheek, and o’er that brow,
So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,
The smiles that win, the tints that glow,
But tell of days in goodness spent Symbolism The stars are out of reach, just like the woman in the poem. Darkness could symbolize Byron's romatic losses. Light may signify the hope, joy, and promise of a dream, or new relationship. There are many songs today that reflect typical byronic themes. She Walks in Beauty
By: Lord Byron

She walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that’s best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes;
Thus mellowed to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

One shade the more, one ray the less,
Had half impaired the nameless grace
Which waves in every raven tress,
Or softly lightens o’er her face;
Where thoughts serenely sweet express,
How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.

And on that cheek, and o’er that brow,
So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,
The smiles that win, the tints that glow,
But tell of days in goodness spent,
A mind at peace with all below,
A heart whose love is innocent!
For Example:
1. Creep – Radiohead
2. Jessie’s Girl – Rick Springfield
3. Teardrops on my Guitar – Taylor Swift
4. Terrible emo music in general
5. Stacy’s Mom – Fountains of Wayne
You're Beautiful
By: James Blunt

My life is brilliant.

My life is brilliant.
My love is pure.
I saw an angel.
Of that I'm sure.
She smiled at me on the subway.
She was with another man.
But I won't lose no sleep on that,
'Cause I've got a plan.

You're beautiful. You're beautiful.
You're beautiful, it's true.
I saw your face in a crowded place,
And I don't know what to do,
'Cause I'll never be with you. She Walks in Beauty
By: Lord Byron

She walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that’s best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes;
Thus mellowed to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

One shade the more, one ray the less,
Had half impaired the nameless grace
Which waves in every raven tress,
Or softly lightens o’er her face;
Where thoughts serenely sweet express,
How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.

And on that cheek, and o’er that brow,
So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,
The smiles that win, the tints that glow,
But tell of days in goodness spent,
A mind at peace with all below,
A heart whose love is innocent!
Both contain the Romantic themes:
Unrequited Love
Great Beauty The storylines are nearly identical. Each piece also has a similar backstory. Both works make use of comparisons with heavenly elements. The power of a smile is contained in both writings. Both discuss some form of radience that made the woman stand out. The poem, and the song are written in a sense of awe and wonder. Both works contemplate the woman's innocene and grace. The narrators assume the same role. Neither piece goes into great detail over the woman's appearance. Beauty is defined by both the inside, and outside. "[The Majority of Byron's] shorter romantic poems [similar to this] are direct expressions of his feelings for individuals (Marchand 117)." "You're Beautiful" was inspired by Blunt bumping into his ex-girlfriend of whom he still loved (Nicholl 1). She Walks in Beauty has many potential muses, with the most likely being a random encounter with Elizabeth Wilmot (Reisman 8). Yeah, she caught my eye,
As we walked on by.
She could see from my face that I was,
Flying high, [ - video/radio edited version]
And I don't think that I'll see her again,
But we shared a moment that will last till the end.

(Repeat of first chorus)

You're beautiful. You're beautiful.
You're beautiful, it's true.
There must be an angel with a smile on her face,
When she thought up that I should be with you.
But it's time to face the truth,
I will never be with you. His many works carried the common
themes of the Romantic era. Unlike this poem, there was normally a person who had certain characteristics that were consistant throughout most of Lord Byron's works. An example of a typical Byronic outcast is "the aristocratic, idealistic, and disenchanted hero of the poem Conrad... brooding, potent, and dismissive of social convention"(Pesta 66). "From the moment Childe Harold appeard on the literary scene, it would no longer be possible to destinguish between Byron the man and Byron the Romantic Hero" (Pesta 64). Byron has this "restless itch to rove, this unquenchable thurst to drink in the new and the strange" (Pesta 62) and "his artistic achievements, panache and free spirit [brings] to mind heroic and romantic exploits of" (Pesta 59) other literary works besides his own. Lord Byron's personality was actually reflected in his 'Byronic Heros'.

"His poetry [and] his pose... were seen as indistinguishable" (Wilson 132). The word Byronic is described as "possessing the characteristics of Byron or his poetry, [especially] romanticism, melancholy and melodramatic energy" ("Byronic" par 3). “Byron usually shows rebellion as proof of intellectual independence... and passion as an indication that one is truly alive” (Rosemary par 13). Lord Byron was famous in the Romantic era, but "in the hands of the Victorians, Byron's posthumous renown in England increasingly turned into a feverish anti-Byronism" (Wilson 132). Alliteration "Of cloudless climes and starry skies" (L2)
"... to that tender light." (L5)
"Had half impaired ..." (L8)
"Which waves in ..." (L9)
"... serenely sweet express" (L11)
"So soft, so calm ..." (L14)
"A heart whose love ..." (L18) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) The poem "She Walks in Beauty" is one of his lighter poems. (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Match pull par 1) The Byronic Hero is often described as "[having] warmth without light, heat without sun, and a burning passion that is self consuming in its intensity" (Pesta 59).

"The Byronic Hero was also fiercely proud in his assertion of human dignity, a glorious exemplum of
personal freedom and violent self-expression"
(Pesta 64). "Byron unwittingly described his own paradoxical nature, 'all that's best of dark and bright,' in [the poem] 'She Walks in Beauty'" (Pesta 59). (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Metronome Clip Art 1) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Prezi Library) (Back to Bedlam 1) (Not so beautiful ... 1) (Elizabeth Wilmot ... 35) (Prezi Library)
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