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English 12: WNB Poetry Unit

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Jodi Allan

on 6 October 2016

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Transcript of English 12: WNB Poetry Unit

English 12
Launching the
Writer's Notebook:
POETRY UNIT

In order to determine your understanding of poetry writing at this point, please write a response in your WNB that answers the essential questions. Use specific examples from any poetry you have written in the past.

How do I
explore my life
and the
world around me
in a community of writers?
Which poets and poems
speak
to me? (If poetry isn't your thing--yet--think about the kind of music and songs you like.)
As a poet, what
style of poetry
do I want to create?
What
decisions
used by poets can I add to my repertoire of
habits, strategies, and techniques
to enable me to write poems that engage readers?

(Questions are on the Glue-In, too)

Write this on the first page of your WNB. It's important! Make it big.

Enduring Understandings:
Habit:
Poets live wide-awake lives engaging in the world creating poems that express the stories, ideas, and observations that matter to them and--hopefully--a wider audience.

They develop flexible thinking and a repertoire of strategies to make decisions throughout the writing process.
About This Unit:
Pre-Unit Metacog:
Session One
The quality by which we scrutinize our lives has direct bearing on the product which we live, and upon the changes which we hope to bring about through those lives.

For women, [and men] then, poetry is not a luxury. It is a vital necessity of our existence. It forms the quality of the light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action. Poetry is the way we help give name to the nameless so it can be thought.

—AUDRE LORDE
“POEMS ARE NOT LUXURIES”



Living wide-awake as a writer means watching, listening, paying attention to the world, especially to the small things.

If something catches your eye, trust that it matters in some way. Write to find out more about it. That thing that got you started might take you to a new idea, feeling, or attitude. You are writing to uncover, to name the small and ordinary things that matter to us.

Today you will start your writing life by writing to explore ideas, feelings, and attitudes that you notice in the world.

You will do two writes. Then you will share with two different people in a Turn and Talk.

Poets explore their world living wide-awake.

They pursue and explore ideas, feelings, or attitudes by generating several poems from various angles on the subject that intrigues them.

Read the poems and quote on the Glue-Ins, and write a page in your WNB about your hopes, dreams, and the changes you are facing or will face this year--SENIOR YEAR! Your goal is to write for a minimum of seven minutes.

If you have difficulty writing to the bottom of the page, use any of the following questions to keep you going:
• What small thing keeps catching your eye?
• What chore or daily activity do you secretly enjoy?
• What challenges do you face?
• What obstacles keep you from writing?
• What is bothering you?
• What do you love?
• What do you hate?
• What are you good at?
• What is your favorite thing to eat, wear, or do?

WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED WRITING:
Reread your page and highlight or underline one word or phrase that seems to name what seems most important about what you wrote.




Independent Practice #1:
TURN & TALK
Turn to your geographical partner.

Read part or all of your writing to your partner.
Your partner will then select a sentence, phrase or word that interests him/her and comment on it.

Independent Practice #2:
Write the sentence, phrase, or word your partner selected for you at the top of a clean page. We will call this "Zooming In."

Write again to the bottom of the page. If you have trouble getting to the bottom, use one of the following phrases to get started again:

• I didn’t realize...
• However, now I understand...
• So another way to look at it...
It isn’t as simple as it seems...
• Let me explain...
• So maybe I am wrong...

Before you Turn & Talk:
Reread and reflect on your pages of exploring. Which write did you enjoy the most?

TURN & TALK
Select one of the following questions and talk to your partner about your writing.

How was it to write without a plan?
What was difficult about this writing assignment?
What happened to you as you started to explore a simple thing and kept writing to find something that might keep you writing to the bottom of the page?





Write a Found Poem to bring to class tomorrow.

Reread your notebook entries, and write a 10-15 line poem by simply pulling sentences, phrases, and/or words from one or both entries. Title it.

(This is worth WNB entry check-in points at the door--can't be turned in late)
http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/007.html
"Do You Have Any Advice for Those of Us Just Starting Out?" (Glue-In)
(Glue-In)
Writer's Notebooks (WNB)
Expectations
WNB's should be composition books or spiral notebooks-- not tiny journals.
You may personalize your WNB with pictures and quotes, if you choose

Your WNB will be brought to class daily.
It will be on your desk, open to a fresh page or yesterday's entry, when class starts.
If there are Glue-Ins for the day, you will get them from the podium and PUT THEM IN YOUR WNB. This is not optional. This is also why you need your own glue stick or tape.

You will date, label, and number each entry.
If absent, you will find out what entries you missed and complete them--then show them to me for credit.
WNB entries may not submitted late.
Many of these entries are done IN CLASS; if you are not doing them, then what ARE you doing at this time, exactly?


Write this at the front of your WNB.
It's our motto.
Session Two
Writers live a bit of every day trying to be a writer.
This means writing every day.
This means watching the world every day.
It means to wonder about what we notice
and then writing about it.
Think about this:
Which observation did you feel connected to?
In what way does it connect to you?
What did you observe today on the way to school?



Turn & Talk:
Share the observation you felt connected to and in what way you felt connected.
Listen to each other and then share the observation you made on the way to school.

Look around the room or out the window or into your memory.

Write for
seven minutes
on a single observation. One of the goals here is to build stamina as a writer, too--try not to lift your pen or pencil!

• Include a detailed description of what you saw, heard, or smelled.

• Then allow yourself to stray and write down the thoughts that come to mind as you continue observing (or remembering the observation).

• You are not a participant in this observation, but somehow watching it seems fascinating, and you are wondering now about what you see, hear and/or smell.



(Glue-In)
Independent Practice
Then start a new page and write seven minutes on a second observation (in the room or from your memory).
TURN & TALK
Read one of your observations & thoughts to a partner.

Listeners will notice a detail that seems interesting and repeat back the phrase or sentence that describes the observation.
INVITATION
Capture 5-10 (7-minute) observations.

Go to a park, the mall, the corner of your neighborhood.

Pay attention on the bus or in your car as you go home from school or work. Pay attention at lunch or in A.C.

Collect observations and write a description and thoughts initiated by the observation.

Turn one observation into a 10 line poem OR
turn three observations into a 3-stanza poem.


INVITATION
Session Three
Writers in a community use non-judgmental response so all writers feel free to take risks
and feel comfortable exposing stories that matter and parts of themselves to their classmates.
Form response groups of FOUR people in your geographical area and take turns reading one of the drafts you are most interested in sharing.

Select a timer who will start and stop each writer. Each writer gets about five minutes.
DUE: Observation Poem
Listeners will tell the writer what they found most memorable about their entries and make non-judgmental statements using the following sentence starters:

• I noticed…
• The line that sticks out for me is…
• The part I remember best is…
• I felt…when this happened in the story…
• I wish I knew more about…
• I wonder…
• This part in the story reminded me of…

The writer will take notes on the nonjudgmental feedback in his/her WNB.

Select
two
of the following questions.
Write a
metacognitive

entry
in your WNB. (Questions are also on your Glue-In)

1. How did it feel for a group of readers to respond to your writing?
2. What intentional decisions did the response group notice in your writing?
3. What did the response group notice that helped you see in your writing in a new way?
4. What did you learn from responding to the writing of your classmates?

Task
INVITATION
Write a poem
giving advice
to someone who is just learning something.
It can be to a writer, football player, skateboarder, driver--anything!

You pick the thing that has to be learned.
Write as if you are the expert and give both big advice that seems logical and small advice that might not seem important to someone who isn’t as skilled as you.
Write 15-25 lines.
Session Four
"No ideas but in things. Center on the everyday circumstances of life and the lives of common people."
William Carlos Williams

"No great poet is afraid of being himself. Tell stories that reflect the actual culture, include their suffering, love of music, laughter, and language itself."
Langston Hughes

"Write inside out. Experiment radically with form, punctuation, spelling and syntax; abandon traditional techniques and structures; create a new means of poetic expression."
e.e. cummings

Reading Immersion and Collecting Entries



You will write three poems after studying how poets use a repertoire of technical and structural decisions to write.
The combination of decisions a poet uses actually creates his/her style. In a similar way, you will be making decisions as they write to combine technical and structural decisions.

Poets study the decisions of other poets in order to develop a personal way of writing about the world. This stylistic approach comes from years of study and experimentation with these decisions.
Look closely at several poets to examine their beliefs about writing and the poems that emerged from those beliefs. In doing this work, you will begin to compile a list of decisions to consider using in your own work as you experiment and generate new poems.

While we study the moves that poets make you need to find your own mentor poet.
DUE: Advice Poem
Model:
Listen as I share my list of technical/stylistic decisions I have noticed in the work of my mentor poet; I will tell you what decisions I used when writing my own poem and why.

And don't judge my poetry skills :) Thanks.
Poetic Techniques/Decisions
Diction- Connotation (an association [emotional] which the word evokes) and Denotation (literal meaning of a word)
Line breaks and white space
Repetition
Figurative language-Metaphor, simile, analogy
Allusions [literary, historical, or mythological]
Punctuation
Capitalization
With your partner, take turns reading and studying two poems by your mentor poet. Write the name of the poems you are looking at in your WNB.

Begin a list of technical decisions you see the poet making.
Also note what you think is the purpose of the poem.

Select one that you really admire.
Copy it into your WNB and annotate it.
What does this technique do to help you understand the poem?
Let's look at poems by William Carlos Williams, Langston Hughes, and ee cummings. We will read one poem by each mentor poet and discuss the techniques we see.

Then you will work with your partner to study poetry by one of the mentor poets.

Eventually, you will write a poem that employs some of the techniques you identified in the mentor poet's work.
Spring and All
by William Carlos Williams

By the road to the contagious hospital
under the surge of the blue
mottled clouds driven from the
northeast-a cold wind. Beyond, the
waste of broad, muddy fields
brown with dried weeds, standing and fallen

patches of standing water
the scattering of tall trees

All along the road the reddish
purplish, forked, upstanding, twiggy
stuff of bushes and small trees
with dead, brown leaves under them
leafless vines-

Lifeless in appearance, sluggish
dazed spring approaches-

They enter the new world naked,
cold, uncertain of all
save that they enter. All about them
the cold, familiar wind-

Now the grass, tomorrow
the stiff curl of wildcarrot leaf
One by one objects are defined-
It quickens: clarity, outline of leaf

But now the stark dignity of
entrance-Still, the profound change
has come upon them: rooted, they
grip down and begin to awaken

Theme for English B
by Langston Hughes

The instructor said,

Go home and write
a page tonight.
And let that page come out of you--
Then, it will be true.

I wonder if it's that simple?
I am twenty-two, colored, born in Winston-Salem.
I went to school there, then Durham, then here
to this college on the hill above Harlem.
I am the only colored student in my class.
The steps from the hill lead down into Harlem,
through a park, then I cross St. Nicholas,
Eighth Avenue, Seventh, and I come to the Y,
the Harlem Branch Y, where I take the elevator
up to my room, sit down, and write this page:


in Just—
by ee cummings

in Just—
spring when the world is mud-
luscious the little
lame balloonman

whistles far and wee

and eddieandbill come
running from marbles and
piracies and it’s
spring

when the world is puddle-wonderful

the queer
old balloonman whistles
far and wee
and bettyandisabel come dancing

from hop-scotch and jump-rope and


it’s
spring
and
the

goatfooted
balloonMan whistles
far
and
wee

Mentor Poet Study
You're going to work on these poems. First, you'll work alone then you can turn and talk.

While you study the poems, mark them up.

Create a chart in your WNB of the techniques you are finding in this poetry.
Select one poem
from your mentor poet
that has two or more technical decisions that you admire and would like to try. Hand-write and annotate the poem in your WNB.

Independent Practice
Report-Out:
Let's make a cumulative list in our WNB of the devices that poets used. This list will remind us of the range of decisions poets make
INVITATION
Write a poem under the influence of the poem from your mentor poet you annotated last night.
Use the same techniques in your poem.
Use a different subject and make your poem shorter or longer.
The Writer's Notebook
Paying Attention
Watching
Listening
Living Wide-awake
is here
is important
is important too
is important
Observe the World Around you
facts, opinions, nature,
converstaion, arguments,
music, lyrics, etc...
"It is hard for me to separate my development as a reader of poems from my career as a poet. If my readings have any sensitivity, it is because I have paid close attention to how my own poems worked, and to which ways and to what extent I might improve them." Mark Strand ~ On Becoming a Poet
Session Five

Finding a Mentor Poet
Poets read a range of poetry to study it and find a poet they admire and wish to study more deeply.

They study the basic repertoire of technical and structural decisions used by all poets in a variety of stylistic ways.

Through this study and experimentation with this repertoire, they make decisions to craft their own poetry and create their own style of writing.
MODEL:
Listen as I read one of my favorite poems.
After I read it, I will tell you about the technical and/or structural decisions I like that the poet makes and explain why I think they are effective.
Then I will talk about what, in my opinion, is the purpose of the poem.



Read the second mentor poem and notice if the poet uses the same decisions in this poem as well.
What does the poet do that is different?
What do you like about this poet or this poem?

WRITE YOUR THOUGHTS IN YOUR WNB
Turn and Talk
Turn to your geographical partner.

Share your observations of the mentor poem. Explain what you think the poet was trying to help a reader understand when she/he use the technique or structure.
Identify two or three things you noticed and admired.
Explain your reasons for admiring the work. What is the effect on them as a reader?
Report Out to the Class
Independent Practice
Purposes for Poems
• Express personal reaction
• Illustrate an idea
• Reflect on and change a past way of seeing or understanding
• Argue a way of seeing or understanding
• Offer advice

Independent Practice
Read three poems of four different poets.
Keep a list of the poems that you read by each poet.
Decide which poet you like the best.
Then select a single poem from that poet.
~Make a list of 3-5 techniques or structures that you admire.
~Determine the purpose for the poem using the list of
purposes on the chart.
~Write a paragraph explaining how the poet’s technical and
structural decisions accomplish what he said about writing
poetry.

(see Glue-In)

Turn and Talk
First, reread your favorite poem again, in preparation for reading it aloud to your group.
Now, take turns reading your poems to each other.
Go to the book store or a library to find a collection of poems by a poet you admire. Purchase the collection or check the book out of the library. You will use this book for the rest of the unit as you study the decisions of this single poet and write your own poems.
Get a book of poetry by a favorite poet
(NO kids' poems or lyrics--see the acceptable poets list)
INVITATION
DUE DATE:
Coming Up!
*You will need a collection of poetry by ONE POET. You will print out 6-10 poems by the same poet, or you can buy a book. It's your choice. Be thinking about this.

http://www.poets.org/
Session Six


Poets study the structures and shifts other poets use to craft a poem. They experiment with these structures as they draft and redraft to explore an emerging poem.
By studying the “chunks” of the poems, the order and shifts become more visible. Structuring order and shifts are an important part of helping a reader construct the poem’s meaning and feel connected to the idea or feelings expressed in the poem.
Chunking
To prepare for session six: You will need one of your own drafted poems to work with.
Model
Listen first as I read the poem "Those Winter Sundays." Then we will read it together, in unison.

Let me tell you where I see “chunks” of meaning in this poem. There is no“right” answer for these “chunks"; one person might say a chunk is imagery and another might call that same thing observation.
The goal is to notice a “chunk” and give it a name.


THOSE WINTER SUNDAYS
by Robert Hayden

Sundays too my father got up early
and put his clothes on in the blueblack cold,
then with cracked hands that ached from labor
in the weekday weather made banked fires blaze.
No one ever thanked him.

I'd wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.
When the rooms were warm, he'd call,
and slowly I would rise and dress,
fearing the chronic angers of that house,

Speaking indifferently to him,
who had driven out the cold
and polished my good shoes as well.

What did I know, what did I know
of love's austere and lonely offices?





Chunk
Small Moment


Comment
Sensory detail & action (person 1)
Small Moment
Sensory detail & action (person 2)
Comment
Question
Notice the lines/chunks that create a shift in the poem. It might be a change of setting or time, or the focus on a character, idea, or feeling. The poem’s chunks add up to help me understand the poem’s meaning; the shift also impacts my understanding of the meaning.
THOSE WINTER SUNDAYS
by Robert Hayden

Sundays too my father got up early
and put his clothes on in the blueblack cold,
then with cracked hands that ached from labor
in the weekday weather made banked fires blaze.
No one ever thanked him.

I'd wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.
When the rooms were warm, he'd call,
and slowly I would rise and dress,
fearing the chronic angers of that house,

Speaking indifferently to him,
who had driven out the cold
and polished my good shoes as well.

What did I know, what did I know
of love's austere and lonely offices?





Making Meaning
Most adults get up early on weekdays for work; this dad gets up early on Sundays, as well.
This dad worked outside in the "weekday weather." During the week, he works on behalf of his family. On weekends, he continues to work for the family.
No one thanked him? Not the wife? None of the other kids? Not the speaker, for sure.
SHIFT to what the speaker did do.
(What the speaker did not do.)
Listen and wait, and fear.
"Indifferently" means having no interest or concern. The speaker speaks like this to his father, after his father made the house toasty and made his shoes presentable (for church, I assume). Typical of kids, perhaps? What does he say to his dad, I wonder?
Shift
I bet the speaker didn't realize the dad had done these things -- driven away cold and polish shoes--as a child. Only in adulthood does the speaker acknowledge that the dad should have been thanked, for his actions showed the love he had for his family.
"austere" means strict or plain.
"offices" means a beneficial act performed for another. It is a obligation, a duty.
Regret? Bitterness? New understanding?
Notice the sounds (alliteration and consonance--"k" sound)
Chonic = Cronus-- Greek god, father of Zeus, who ate his own children. Connection?
opposites
The dad was not "warm," but he made the house physically warm.
Partner Work
Read the second poem, “Elisabeth” by Donald Graves.

Identify the “chunks.” Agree on a name. Identify what seems like an important shift in the poem. Decide what the poem means, how the structure (chunks) helps you understand that meaning and how the shift impacts your understanding of the meaning.

*Label the chunks in the left margins. Make meaning on the poem and in the right margin.



We will come back together in about 10 to 15 minutes.
ELISABETH
by Donald Graves

A clump of boys
from fourth grade
stand on the playground
not speaking about
much of anything at all
until talk of love and girls
sneaks in from the edges
of somewhere.

“I love Elisabeth Lindberg,”
I say quickly, thinking
my early statement might
get me first dibs.

“So do I,” says Jimmy.
“Me too,” interrupts Robert.
“I’ve loved her ever since
first grade,” argues Nicky.
“No, no,” she knows I love her
shouts Paul, “I told her.”
“You did!” we chorus.
“What did she say?”
“Nothing.”

Possible labels for chunks:
Comment
Dialogue
Observation
Shift
Imagery
Questioning

Moment
Sensory Detail
Action
(PART TWO)
Early notebook entry-drafts can be redrafted by revising the structure.

Poets play with the structures of their poems to explore various ways the poem could be imagine or to find another poem in this first draft that seems intriguing but offers other opportunities.
Model
Let's look at one of my early drafts of a poem; I'll show you an experiment I did on the poem using one of our mentor poem's structures.
Select one of the generated structures studied today.
Revise a previously drafted poem using this new structure.
Give credit to the poet you studied by writing “After…..and poet’s name” under the title of your poem.
Commit to staying true to the structure for this single revision experiment.
Independent Practice




Reread the mentor poems you have studied. Make a list of possible “chunks” you might use. Create an order/structure.

Rewrite a draft already in your notebook
using this new structure.


Small Group Read-Around

Read aloud one of your favorite entries. Afterward, tell the group why you are connected to this entry.
What happened to your original idea as you tried this new structure?
How might you use this technique with other first drafts of revision drafts?
Jot in your WNB:
INVITATION
Session Seven
The poet’s notebook becomes a rich resource. Rereading it allows a poet to discover the topics, themes, structures and techniques they tried and tend to return to again and again.
This rereading work is the first step in planning a project and finding the poems that are ready for revision and the publication process.
Model
Take a tour of my notebook. I'll show you how I make connections among my entries and make meaning. You will be doing this with your own WNB.

Stop when you arrive at a freewrite, experiment, or poem draft that you are interested in revising and publishing.

Write yourself a note explaining why you want to rethink and revise this entry. Jot it on the page or on a sticky note.

Notice the ways you are connected to your entries: topic, theme, structure, line breaks or shape, poetry decisions/techniques.
Take a Tour of Your WNB
You'll need some stickie notes for this.
Finding Your Muse
Habit:
Poets find inspiration in the work of all kinds of artists.

Report Out
Let's chart the connections we are making to the entries.
Bookmark (sticky note) your notebook identifying entries you would like to revise toward publication. Also notice and write a note to yourself on your bookmark stating
1. The connection
2. Why you are selecting this entry
3. (If possible) how you plan to revise the poem

Getting Ready to Revise
Find a New Mentor Poet and Poem

Talk to a classmate and find a new mentor poem. Share your mentor poet/book with others.

Study a new poet and new poems.
Select one poem that you admire.
Look at it on several levels: the topic, theme, structure, and poetry decisions.

Write a note to yourself in the WNB stating why you like this poem and want to study it a little bit more so you can use similar decisions in your revision work.

INVITATION

STUDY AND EXPERIMENTATION WITH
THE DECISIONS OF MENTOR POETS

What technical, structural, or stylistic decisions do you find most effective for generating a poem? How does the combination of several decisions impact or influence the meaning of your poems?

Select a mentor poet and poem and a single draft from your writer’s notebook that best demonstrates the influence of the poets you are studying on the decisions you have chosen to generate new poems and the impact of that experimentation on the meanings you are consciously crafting or discovering as you write.

Explain how using these technical, structural or stylistic decisions have changed the way you think about writing/poetry or think about yourself as a writer/poet.

REFLECTING on THE WRITER’S NOTEBOOK:
Formative Assessment
(After session 7)
Session Eight
Poets engage in writer response groups
to be a critical friend and early reader to other poets in the writing community and gain insight into their own writing through the response of their peers.


You will participate in a response group sharing and gathering feedback on a
single poem draft
and providing response to other poets in the group.

Pass copies immediately, so all group members have a copy of all group members before starting. Identify a time keeper. Every writer gets an equal amount of time for response (8 minutes). Identify a first writer/reader.
First writer/reader reads entry (1 minute) and remains silent during response acting like an eavesdropper. Reader takes notes.
Response group members engage in conversation about the poem using the response group stems learned in Session 2. Group members do not talk to or ask question of the writer/reader. Members point out lines and details, name the devices, and explain how they understand the poem. They agree and disagree trying to make sense of the poem. They spend more time noticing and explaining (4 minutes); they spend less time stating confusions, imagining and wondering about changes (3 minutes).
Writer/Reader closes the time by saying thank you. The writer/reader does not explain the poem or ask questions. Students may ask questions or have additional conversation about their writing after the group finishes all writers.

Peer Response Groups
BRING 4 COPIES OF ONE POEM YOU WANT TO REVISE.
YOU WILL BE SHARING THE POEM WITH A PEER RESPONSE GROUP TO GET FEEDBACK
.
Invitation
What did you learn about your poem or the decisions you used to create it as you listened to your response group and took notes? What is one-strength in your writing? What changes might you make?
Metacognitive Reflection in WNB
Session 9
Poets create a revision plan using a repertoire of decisions generated from their mentor poet study.
Model
Let's look at one of my poems, the feedback I got from my response group, and my revised poem.

Reread your response group notes.
Write a revision plan based on some, not all, of your notes.



Turn and Talk
Read the poem draft and revision plan to a partner.

Take turns commenting on or changing the revision plans.

Apply the revision commitments you have made in your plan to the poem-draft.

Annotate your revised draft by underlining, highlighting, and labeling the revisions.
Independent Practice
Turn and Talk
Take turns reading your revised poems.
Listeners should point out an effective revision and explain how it impacted their understanding of the poem.
How did making revision commitments impact your revision work? How effective was your plan? Point out one effective revision commitment. What made it effective? Are there additional changes you would make now?
Metacognitive Reflection
SESSION 10

Poets edit to impact the pace of the poem and ease for a reader to understand the poem’s intentions.
MODEL
Listen as I read two versions of one of my poems. We will discuss how the punctuation affects the speed and emphasis of words and lines. Remember: Correct spelling is always required (however, white space decisions can alter spelling, but for a very specific reason—like in e.e. cummings' work).
Turn and Talk
What decision about punctuation, capitalization and white space
will you be making that will affect your editing work?


Independent Practice
Edit and format your poem in preparation for submitting it for publication.

*Try a two different different experiments on the poem
SPEED OR SLOW THE PACE OF THE POEM: Experiments

Slow down the pace—These decisions encourage the reader to read slower
Complete sentences on a line with a period.
Stanza breaks slow the poem. Add a period or question mark at the end of the stanza and you get a long pause that stops the reader before he/she moves on to the next stanza.
Punctuation marks at the end of the line create a pause and slow or stop the reader.
Slow: comma
Stop: period, semi-colon, colon, question mark
NOTE: Poets rarely use exclamation points except in children’s poetry. The words should create the emotional reaction that an exclamation point adds.

Speed up the pace—these decisions encourage the reader to read faster
Break the phrase and force the reader to move quickly to the next line
Use no punctuation
Use no capitalization
Use only one stanza

Unit Performance Task
Mrs. Allan's Mentor Poet:
Billy Collins

"Litany"
Teacher Stuff

John Green: Welcome Back to School

Assignment #1:
What is your mission? Are you privileged?

Write it in your WNB.
Mrs. Knudson's
Mentor Poet

Dorothy Parker
Mrs. Knudson's Code
Log in to Google Classroom tonight and go through the course syllabus with your parent(s). Complete the Syllabus Assignment and turn it in on Google Classroom.
Pay Attention to the ***
Rules for Exam Exemptions
.*** and Grading Policy.

"How to Read a Poem"
http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/p180-howtoread.html
1. Late Work Policy and where to find stuff
Signed Syllabus Acknowledgment sheet by 9/6

2. John Green Video (fingers crossed it works!)
*Listen to what he says. Do you agree?
Are you privileged?
*Think about your mission for the year. You will be writing in your WNB about this later.

3. Pre-Unit Metacog! WHOOT!
Happy Wednesday!
How to choose a poet
http://flavorwire.com/170404/10-contemporary-poets-you-should-know/view-all/
Contemporary Poets
http://www.poetseers.org/contemporary-poets/
Do not select:
HUGHES, FROST, CUMMINGS, WILLIAMS
Happy Monday 9/9
1. Due for check in:
Found Poem and Poem Impossible.
(Turn and Talk----share your poems!)

2. Freewrites:
two per week
one full page in WNB
due each Monday (first check in 9/16)

3. Observations and Observation Poem
Due tomorrow

4. You will need a poetry collection for future poetry assignments


Going to the Lab! WHOOT!
Type observation(s) and type your poem below it
Save to GOOGLE DRIVE ENGLISH FOLDER:
OBSERVATION POEM
Search for mentor poet
http://raspberrythunderbolt.wordpress.com/2008/10/07/billy-collins-taking-off-emily-dickinsons-clothes/
Williams/Hughes/Cummings
Let's jigsaw the poems we studies by these three mentor poets.

We will put poems you annotated under the ELMO so classmates can see the poet's technical decisions.
Now take another look at the poems you studied.

Using the "Purpose of Poems" glue-in, discuss with your partner what the purpose of each poem could be.
After Session 5...before Session 6

First look at mentor poets...
Due: Poem in which you write like a mentor poet
INVITATION
Read several of your own poet's work.
Jot the titles and the techniques/decisions you notice in your WNB.
Chunking Your mentor Poems
Time to choose 3 poems from your book to CHUNK.
Copy them into your WNB and annotate them.
Create chunks and labels for those chunks.
Make meaning of those chunks in the other margin.


Find YOUR muse! What inspires you? Who inspires you? Collect 3-5 artifacts that you can put in your WNB. Glue these onto a Muse Page or, if you want to be public about it, put the on the cover.
Redone Session 7
House Keeping Stuff
Mr. Kreinbring's Code
Go to google classroom and use this code to join the class.
gmgf891
Elireview code:
girdle366aortas

Assignment
Chalk Talk?
At this point you need to be collecting poems and narrowing down to one poet who you like. By the end of the week you must have those 6-10 poems.

Sign into Google Classroom for today's assignment.
You'll find a copy on your Google Drive too. Just remember to use you @avondaleschools.org
Poetic Stuff
Moves, Techniques

Sylvia Plath "Mirror"
Print a glue in-able copy of Sylvia Plath's poem, "Mirror, and Picasso's painting "The Girl Before the Mirror".
Mirror
I am silver and exact. I have no preconceptions.
Whatever I see I swallow immediately
Just as it is, unmisted by love or dislike.
I am not cruel, only truthful ‚
The eye of a little god, four-cornered.
Most of the time I meditate on the opposite wall.
It is pink, with speckles. I have looked at it so long
I think it is part of my heart. But it flickers.
Faces and darkness separate us over and over.

Now I am a lake. A woman bends over me,
Searching my reaches for what she really is.
Then she turns to those liars, the candles or the moon.
I see her back, and reflect it faithfully.
She rewards me with tears and an agitation of hands.
I am important to her. She comes and goes.
Each morning it is her face that replaces the darkness.
In me she has drowned a young girl, and in me an old woman
Rises toward her day after day, like a terrible fish.

Sylvia Plath
Now read the poem. Write down 8-10 questions you have about it. Star or highlight your top 3.
Invitation


Write a poem about an inanimate object with symbolic value. Use Plath's 2 stanza format, first person point of view and her use of personification and metaphor.

Bring poems by your mentor poet tomorrow!


Get into groups. Take your questions with you. Answer the questions.
Whats' the difference between the two stanzas?

Take 5 minutes and write about the painting.
Which is the girl? the mirror?
Compare the two.
Notice what's fragmented or distorted.

In your WNB take 5 minutes and write a response to the painting.
Turn and Talk
Talk about your own muse(s). What inspires you? How did you find your mentor poet? What pushes you, motivates you, makes you angry.
Quick Write:
2 minutes on what inspires you. Who are your muses?
Now lets look at how a poet is inspired by a painting.
Turn and Talk 2 minutes
Transition to your Mentor Poet.

We understand that not everyone's Mentor Poet does the same thing(s) as the poet we looked today. That's okay.
Your task is to look at your Poet's work and use the approach we used.
Chalk Talk in your WNB.
Glue a copy of one of your poet's poems into your WNB. Invite another person or two to chalk talk it. We need to see names and different color inks but you don't have to do it at the same time.

Hughes
Williams Carlos Williams
2 ways

Rewrite one of your mentor poems using Williams' style of line breaks. Do this at least twice.
cummings
new words

Look at a poem from your mentor and find 6-10 places where you can push words together, spread them out, or elongate the poem in order to create a sense of movement or shape.
Make a new poem using this new set of words and phrases.

English 12 Mentor Poetry Research Project

This is a 3 part project.

Part One:
The Poet
In this section you will present a concise discussion of the poet’s background, influences-other poets, major events, in the poet’s life It is your aim to provide your reader with a clear understanding of how your poet’s life is present in his or her poetry. You should consult biographies, criticism and interviews.

Note: This isn’t a biography. It is your understanding of how your author has lived wide awake in his/her world.

Length: 1-2 pages


Part 2:
The Work
Choose two poems. Close read both and then in well written essay discuss how they represent your poet’s style, themes, abilities. It’s up to you. . This is your own analysis so secondary sources are not required.

Length: 1-2 pages


Part 3:
The Metacognitive
In this section you are to provide a personal discussion of your own experience with your poet. Be honest about how you chose the work, your reading of it, and your approach to the project. Include your explications and the poems you wrote “under the influence.”
Length: 1 page not including the poems.




You must log into Google with your Avondaleschools.org log in (you will find it in the front of your agenda).
Kreinbring's stuff
http://www.poets.org/
Reference "To Those of Us Just Starting Out"
Day Two
You're going on walk. Take your WNB with you so you can take notes and steal ideas.


Now lets talk.
Each group is required to share their best observation as we go through the poem.
Here is an example:
Check In
Explicated Mentor Poem
Poem Under the Influence
Plath and Picasso
Next...
Finally...
Check Out
Google Classroom for tomorrow's excellent poem.
4th Hour--- 0lgkk1m
Let's look at some other writers' work first.
Pre Unit Assessment

Choose one of the quotes by a famous writer. Cut and paste it to the top of your response.
Write a one-page reaction to the quote.
Do you agree or disagree with the quote?
Do you take exception to a part of it?
Why do you feel the way you do?
Using personal examples, explain your reaction to the quote and why you chose it.

Share your Found Poem
Also, take a couple minutes-about 10-and write about your First Days. What are your memories about them, first day of school, work, any first days. What made the best ones Best?
Stories
Not
Stuff
#storiesnotstuff

A Modest Proposal:
In the interest of promoting story telling and a richer more meaningful Senior Year, we pursue, collect and share stories with one another. Once a month I propose we devote a class period to this.
How it Works.
Pick a theme, tell stories on that theme.

This month's theme is "Firsts and Lasts".

We draw names out of a jar and take turns telling our stories.

Best 2-3 stories get prizes.
Rules for Storytelling:

No Notes!

5 Minute Limit!

Must be true to memory of the storyteller.
"No ideas but in things. Center on the everyday circumstances of life and the lives of common people."
William Carlos Williams

"No great poet is afraid of being himself. Tell stories that reflect the actual culture, include their suffering, love of music, laughter, and language itself."
Langston Hughes

"Write inside out. Experiment radically with form, punctuation, spelling and syntax; abandon traditional techniques and structures; create a new means of poetic expression."
e.e. cummings

http://getlit.org/
http://youthspeaks.org/

t's not easy to know what is true for you or me
at twenty-two, my age. But I guess I'm what
I feel and see and hear, Harlem, I hear you:
hear you, hear me--we two--you, me, talk on this page.
(I hear New York, too.) Me--who?
Well, I like to eat, sleep, drink, and be in love.
I like to work, read, learn, and understand life.
I like a pipe for a Christmas present,
or records--Bessie, bop, or Bach.
I guess being colored doesn't make me not like
the same things other folks like who are other races.
So will my page be colored that I write?

Being me, it will not be white.
But it will be
a part of you, instructor.
You are white--
yet a part of me, as I am a part of you.
That's American.
Sometimes perhaps you don't want to be a part of me.
Nor do I often want to be a part of you.
But we are, that's true!
As I learn from you,
I guess you learn from me--
although you're older--and white--
and somewhat more free.

This is my theme for English B.
WNB Check In and Reflection.
Complete the WNB Reflection form on Google Classroom.

Stop when you arrive at a freewrite, experiment, or poem draft that you are interested in revising and publishing.

Write yourself a note explaining why you want to rethink and revise this entry. Jot it on the page or on a sticky note.

Notice the ways you are connected to your entries: topic, theme, structure, line breaks or shape, poetry decisions/techniques.
Take a Tour of Your WNB
You'll need some stickie notes for this.
Bookmark (sticky note) your notebook identifying entries you would like to revise toward publication. Also notice and write a note to yourself on your bookmark stating
1. The connection
2. Why you are selecting this entry
3. (If possible) how you plan to revise the poem

Getting Ready to Revise
WNB Check In and Reflection.
Complete the WNB Reflection form on Google Classroom.
Habit:
My Writer's notebook becomes a rich resource. Rereading it allows a poet to discover the topics, themes, structures and techniques they tried and tend to return to again and again.
This rereading work is the first step in planning a project and finding the poems that are ready for revision and the publication process.
Conference with Your Gentle Instructor. Bring your WNB.

STUDY AND EXPERIMENTATION WITH
THE DECISIONS OF MENTOR POETS

What technical, structural, or stylistic decisions do you find most effective for generating a poem? How does the combination of several decisions impact or influence the meaning of your poems?

Select a mentor poet and poem and a single draft from your writer’s notebook that best demonstrates the influence of the poets you are studying on the decisions you have chosen to generate new poems and the impact of that experimentation on the meanings you are consciously crafting or discovering as you write.

Explain how using these technical, structural or stylistic decisions have changed the way you think about writing/poetry or think about yourself as a writer/poet.

REFLECTING on THE WRITER’S NOTEBOOK:
Formative Assessment
(After session 7)
Look at your Mentor Poet's use of stanzas and muses. Find a poem that shows one, or better yet both of these techniques. Explicate it and write a poem under the influence.
Next...
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