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Women by: Alice Walker

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by

Allie Lyncha

on 6 December 2013

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Transcript of Women by: Alice Walker

Women by: Alice Walker
Awards
Lillian Smith Award (Winner)
Rosenthal Award (Winner)
Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (Winner)
National Book Award (Winner)

Other Works
Since she is still living, she has written many other things.
The Color Purple (Novel)
The Third Life of Grange Copeland (Novel)
Meridian (Novel)

Women
By: Alice Walker
They were women then
My mama's generation
Husky of voice-stout of
Step
With fists as well as
Hands
How they battered down
Doors
And ironed
Starched white
Shirts
How they lead
Armies

Literary Elements
Imagery
Extended metaphor
Free verse
Respectful and Understanding mood
About Alice
Youngest of 8 kids
When she was four, while her parents were working in the fields, her first grade teacher let her start in class while her mother was at work
She wrote "Women" for her mother, who was very important in her life.
She also writes short stories, essays, and novels.
Most commonly known for writing the novel "The Color Purple"



Headragged generals
Across Mined
Fields
Booby-trapped
Ditches
To discover books
Desks
A place for us
How they knew what we
Must know
Without knowing a page
Of it
Themselves.
Imagery
"Ironed starched white shirts"
This shows imagery because it shows an intense description of the shirts.
Free Verse
This poem has no rhyme scheme. Also, there is not a pattern that the poem follows.
Mood
The mood of this poem is respectful and understanding. The poem talks about the jobs of a woman and the daily struggles they go through, and as a reader you understand and respect that.
Extended Metaphor
This poem is one, long metaphor. It compares war to the daily struggles of a woman. It also mentions that they don't even know what they are doing themselves, so that could possibly mean that sometimes they lose hope of what they are trying to do.
meaning
Questions
What do you think the meaning of lines 22-26, "How they knew what we must know without knowing a page of it themselves" is?
What do you think the "Mined fields and booby-trapped ditches" symbolize?
The meaning of this poem could be viewed in many different ways.
It could be trying to give an idea of the daily struggles of a woman. It could be trying to show that being a woman is hard, and they need to be considered.
Questions
It could be referring to the fight for women's rights. It may be trying to show that the women fought for their freedoms of equality, even if they didn't know what would be the outcome.
It may be talking about how mothers devote themselves to the family and children, without knowing the sacrifices they are making in order to be devoted only to their families.
questions
Why do they say "With fist's as well as hands"? What does that symbolize?
Why does Walker mention books and desks at the end of the poem? What does this have to do with the meaning?
Why would Walker compare women to generals in a war? Is this a good comparison?
Do the analogies to war help Walker to better communicate the meaning of the poem?
This could also show the importance of children's education through a mother's point of view. The poem says that mothers do whatever they can for their children to get a necessary education, even if they have never gotten an education themselves.
Questions
Why do you think the author chose to write about this topic?
Do you think this poem conveys a significant message to the readers?
Full transcript