Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

What Spec Writers Need to Know about BIM

No description
by

Brok Howard

on 27 September 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of What Spec Writers Need to Know about BIM

The Model Element is graphically represented within the Model as a generic system, object or assembly with approximate quantities, size, shape, location, and orientation. Non-graphic information may also be attached to the Model Element.
Example: Light Fixture, generic/approximate size/shape/location.
LOD 200
The Model Element may be graphically represented in the Model with a symbol or other generic representation, but does not satisfy the requirements for LOD 200. Information related to the Model Element (i.e. cost per square foot, tonnage of HVAC, etc.) can be derived from other Model Elements.
Example: Cost/SF attached to floor slabs
LOD 100
Roger
This story is about Roger
1970
Architect Spec Writer Extraordinar
Graduate ready to take the design world by storm
1980
Licensed Architect, adjusting to technology.
1990
Roger is online!
2000
Not ready to retire, so...
Promoted to Spec Writer
Get's his own laptop so he can work from home, great.
2010
BIM
One day, Roger looks up from his cubical to discover...
Wait, let's take a moment to see how BIM snuck up on Roger
A few years earlier.
So, we now know that drafting using a computer was in the works as early as 1954 with Ivan Sutherland's SketchPad.
More videos on YouTube - search "SketchPad"
Starting in 1980 Autodesk releases AutoCAD
1998 Autodesk introduced Architectural Desktop
A more 3D architectural software.
First lines of code of Revit begin 1998
Revit release 2000
2 years later Autodesk buys Revit
Why is Revit such a big deal?
Check out Revit Technology's website (pre Autodesk)
http://web.archive.org/web/20000510111053/http://revit.com/cornerstone/index.html
They were the first (arguably) software built for architects...
"Parametric Building Modeler syn. REVIT.
Revit is the most revolutionary product available to architects on the market today. Only Revit is a true parametric building modeler that allows architects to create designs in ways never before possible. Revit contains intelligent building components, views, and annotations. All are both parametric and are associated bi-directionally through a high performance change propagation engine. Revit gives you the tool that makes more projects happen than ever before! "
Clip from old website
Wait, now you are talking gibberish.
What is parametric?
For a full history of parametric check out Daniel Davis' blog
http://www.danieldavis.com/a-history-of-parametric/
The short of it.
Change.
You change one thing, it changes another.
We also just introduced "object oriented"
What does that mean?
Objects know what they are and how to interact.
For example.
A door, knows it's a door -
Further, the door needs a wall to exist.
We have nearly caught Roger back up, but there are few other things that have happened.
Along with the Architects; Engineers, Contractors and Owners have been reading the same blogs and going to the same conferences learning all this stuff.
Everybody is now an "expert"
And now, everything is going to be in the model....
Right?
Wrong
Are you starting to feel like Roger?
?
Let's break it down.
We moved from drafting to drafting on computer.
We then started to model, drafting in 3D.
Then the software got smart and the 3D objects had intelligence.
But how intelligent is intelligent?
The more data, the better...right?
The more reliable data...when you need it is key
This gives Roger an idea.
We need to specify what information we need and when we need it.
To learn more about Revit History check this link out
http://forums.augi.com/showthread.php?20803-Revit-Timeline-(W-I-P-)
Well, in fact - just last month the collaboration of many minds got together to do just that.
In 2011 the BIMForum initiated the development of this LOD Specification and formed a working group comprising contributors from both the design and construction sides of the major disciplines.
http://bimforum.org/lod/
To dive deep into this document click on the link from bimforum.org
http://bimforum.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/2013-LOD-Specification.pdf
A little history first...
In 2008, the AIA developed its first set of Level of Development definitions in AIA Document E202 - 2008 Building Information Modeling Protocol.
Due to the rapidly evolving nature of the use of BIM, they updated and reconfigured Digital Practice documents,
AIA E203-2013, Building Information Modeling and Digital Data Exhibit
AIA G201-2013, Project Digital Data Protocol Form
AIA G202-2013, Project Building Information Modeling Documents.
These AIA updates included revised LOD definitions
LOD - Levels of Development
The LOD framework addresses several issues that arise when a BIM is used as a communication or collaboration tool, i.e. when someone other than the author extracts information from it:
Clarify how conceptual to precise BIM objects are along the design path.
Need more than simple appearance to tell the difference.
State the specified reliability
Creates dependency on design work plans so model users know when information will be available in order to plan their work
Level of Development vs Level of Detail
Level of Detail is essentially how much detail is included in the model element. Level of Development is the degree to which the element's geometry and attached information has been thought through - the degree to which project team members may rely on the information when using the model. In essence, Level of Detail can be thought of as input to the element, while Level of Development is reliable output.
The Model Element is graphically represented within the Model as a specific system, object or assembly in terms of quantity, size, shape, location, and orientation. Non-graphic information may also be attached to the Model Element.
Example: Design specified 2x4 troffer, specific size/shape/location
LOD 300
The Model Element is graphically represented within the Model as specific system, object or assembly in terms of quantity, size, shape, orientation, and interfaces with other building systems. Non-graphic information may also be attached to the Model Element.
Example: Actual model, Lightolier DPA2G12LS232, specific size/shape/location
LOD 350
The Model Element is graphically represented within the Model as specific system, object or assembly in terms of size, shape, location, quantity, and orientation with detailing, fabrication, assembly, and installation information. Non-graphic information may also be attached to the Model Element.
Example: As 350, plus special mounting details, as in a decorative soffit.
LOD 400
The Model Element is a field verified representation in terms of size, shape, location, quantity, and orientation. Non-graphic information may also be attached to the Model Elements.

Since this level is intended for facility management it might be less detailed than other levels. It could be documented with a database and a photo.
LOD 500
What LOD does not mean...
There is no strict correspondence between LODs and design phases
There is no such thing as an "LOD ____ Model.
You might have several categories at different LODs at any given design phase
SD
So, when do you specify LODs?
Who
have
Who will be modeling the content?

Who will be managing the deliverables?

Who will be coordinating project specifications?

Who is setting model use expectations?
Architectural Technician
Project Architect
Project Spec Writer
Project Manager
TEAM
It is a true team effort setting LOD expectations
Without setting LODs you will have issues.

If the LOD is low and those using the model are expecting something higher, you will hear complaints of not delivering value.

If the LOD is too high, you are exposing more risk than necessary.
Bring the team together and set the project expectations...together.
AIA E202
http://www.aia.org/groups/aia/documents/pdf/aiab083007.pdf
Authorized Uses
LOD
MEA
CSI UniFormat
http://fire.nist.gov/bfrlpubs/build99/PDF/b99080.pdf
http://bim.psu.edu/Uses/
So, this is BIM
Are we changing
our process?
Let's go back to Roger's idea...
"We need to specify what information we need and when we need it."
If the future of the industry is moving from paper delivery to a model delivery who will be setting LOD requirements in those models?
We will always need someone to specify...who do you want doing this at your company?
YOUR EXPERIENCE HAS VALUE
HOW DO YOU PLAN TO TRANSFER YOUR KNOWLEDGE?
Take the BIM Gurus into the field
Show them LOD in the real world
Include yourself into the conversation, you understand BIM and the value of clear, concise, correct data.
You now understand LOD - what should be specified when?
Isn't that your job?
he was ready for the conversation
Drink the BIM Kool-aide
#Spec4BIM
#CONSTRUCT
@brokhoward
Full transcript