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COMM101

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ersan dur

on 24 September 2013

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Transcript of COMM101

Information Literacy @
SKL for COMM 101 Students
SUNA KIRAÇ LIBRARY
June 2013
What is Information Literacy?
Information Literacy is the set of skills needed to
find,

retrieve
,
analyze
, and
use
information. (ACRL)
Types of Information Sources?
Books / Reference Resources

Scholarly Journals

Magazines

Professional / Trade Journals

Newspapers

Internet sites

Argumentative
In the introduction, there should be some kind of thesis statement
If a multi-author volume, each chapter will have an intro with a thesis statement

Dialogic
Written in dialogue with other specialists in their field
You can easily tell, as there will be substantial works cited
Scholarly Books

Sometimes called a monograph, is an in-depth work with a unifying topic

Covers material in depth
Good source for background information
Publisher mostly university presses ( Cambridge University Press, Oxford Un.)
Bibliographies / Works Cited are included
Periodicals/Journals
Periodicals are publications that are published in a regular, open-ended series.

Journals are a type of periodical. Each issue of a journal contains a number of articles.

There are three major types of journals:
Scholarly Journals
Popular (magazines)
Professional / Trade
Bibliographies / Works Cited are included

Footnotes / Endnotes / Internal citations are used

Original research is reported

The assumed audience is experts or specialists in the field

Familiarity with specialized vocabulary and concepts is assumed

Pictures are usually not included unless they are essential to the content being discussed (such as in art journals)

Scholarly journals are funded through subscriptions, not through advertisements
SCHOLARLY JOURNALS
Argumentative & Dialogic
Writing (Genre of Writing)
POPULAR MAGAZINES
Easy to understand language
No specific format
Professional Journalists
Commercial Publishers
General Audience
Color Photos
Glossy Paper
Brief non-technical articles
Credentials or authors often not identified
Commercial Advertisement

Usually informative writing, Sometimes argumentative Rarely Dialogic Writing (usually no citations)
PROFESSIONAL/TRADE JOURNALS
Specific group with an interest in a particular trade/industry.
Provide general news, information, and statistics about a specific industry.
Industry specific advertising.
Professional technical, business, and staff writers.
Writers not always identified.
Rarely cites-bibliographies.
Professional publishers.
Glossy paper, color photos.

Main Purpose is to: Support industry, public relations,and professionals.
Scholarly
Article
Trade
Journal
Types of Information Sources
Newspapers are a type of periodical. Many newspapers are published daily and are intended for a local, regional or national audience. 
Newspapers
“informative writing”

Newspapers

extremely current information and are useful for time-sensitive information

provide effective current event awareness 

provide local information for the geographic areas

Newspapers can provide a context when examining historic or social

Newspapers often contain opinion articles and editorials, providing a window into the way people perceive and interpret events
Internet Sites
WHO IS THIS WRITTEN FOR?

What audience is the author writing this for?
Is this written for teenagers, legislators, young children, technicians, fathers, etc.?
Does the Web page contain jargon meant for a particular group such as librarians, computer programmers, doctors, etc.?
Evaluating Web Sites
WHO IS THE AUTHOR?

information about this person - their profession, education, titles, etc.?
an authority on the subject? OR is this a fifth grader writing a "web" report?
does the author list their name?

If you don't know who the author is
it's best not to use the material.
IS THIS SCHOLARLY MATERIAL?

Is the document supported with cited references?
Does the Web page contain any evidence to substantiate the author's expertise with the subject?
Does the author display knowledge of the field the article is addressing?
Are there numerous spelling/grammar errors?
Evaluating Web Sites
Is there any evidence of bias?
Is the Web page sponsored by a corporation that wants to sell you something?
Who is the author and are they trying to sway your opinion?
Is the Web page owner an organization looking to present their point of view on an issue?
Evaluating Web Sites
IS THIS OUT OF DATE?
(CURRENCY)

When evaluating Internet resources, it is important to look at the
currency of the information and the web page. 

Keep these questions in mind when you are looking at a page:
Is the document dated?
When was the page written?
When was the page last updated?
When was the page mounted?
Is the content of the work current or up-to-date?
Are there links to older or newer information?
Are the links up-to-date?
(cc) image by nuonsolarteam on Flickr
SUNA KIRAÇ
LIBRARY
Reserve Desk
Course reserves

TOEFL materials

Team study rooms

Audiobooks
Information Desk
Reference Librarian
Kamil Yesiltas
Çigdem Yildirim
Sina Mater
Periodicals/Journals
Articles
Scholarly Books
Information Literacy
IL is the set of
skills need to..
Newspapers
Evaluating Web Sites
Retrieve
Find
Analyze
and use Information..
Scholarly Books, Genre of Writing
Who is the author? No credentials (Prof. Dr. ect..)
No bibliographies & work cited
PopularJournal

PIN number permits you to:

Renew your books online,

Checking your hold request/s,

Access electronic reserve materials,

Access databases Off-Campus,

Use the “Self-Check” machine to check-out/in books.
SKL
Thank you..
SKL 24/7 Open Library
Year
Authors
Article Title
Journal Title
Number of Issue
Page Number
Evaluating Citation
What is Plagiarism
How can we avoid plagiarism?
In academic writing, if you copy or paraphrase another person's words, or adopt their ideas or data, without giving credit by citing the source, you are plagiarizing - whether you had intended to cheat or not. And universities do not take plagiarism lightly.
1
.Cite every piece of information that is not a) the result of your own research, or b) common knowledge.

2
.Use quotation marks every time you use the author's words

3
.At the beginning of the first sentence in which you quote, paraphrase, or summarize, make it clear that what comes next is someone else's idea:

-According to Smith...
-Jones says...
-In his 1987 study, Robinson proved...

4
.At the end of the last sentence containing quoted, paraphrased, or summarized material, insert a parenthetical citation to show where the material came from:

The St. Martin's Handbook defines plagiarism as "the use of someone else's words or ideas as [the writer's] own without crediting the other person" (Lunsford and Connors 602).
Full transcript