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American Journey Chapter 7

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by

Sheri Burke

on 13 December 2012

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Transcript of American Journey Chapter 7

IF YOU WANT TO SEE AN EXAMPLE ON HOW TO USE THIS TEMPLATE, PLEASE CHECK: https://prezi.com/n-8ibkiw881r/number-systems/ Most states divided the government functions between the governor and the legislature. They went even further to establish two-house, or bicameral, legislatures to divide power even further. First the states figured out their governments... Section 1
The Articles of Confederation THE IMPACT TODAY
CREATED TO MEET THE NEEDS OF A CHANGING NATION, THE CONSITITUION HAS BEEN THE FUNDAMENTAL LAW OF THE UNITED STATES FOR MORE THAN 200 YEARS. iT HAS SERVED AS A MODEL FOR MANY CONSTITUTIONS ALL OVER THE WORLD. WHY IT MATTERS
When the American colonies broke their political ties with Great Britain, they faced the task of forming independent governments at both the state and national levels. In 1788, the Constitution became the official plan of the American Government AMERICAN JOURNEY
CHAPTER 7
A MORE PERFECT UNION MAIN IDEA
THE LEADERS OF THE NEW UNITED STATES WORKED TO DEFINE THE POWERS OF GOVERNMENT THIRTEEN INDEPENDENT STATES
Problems, Problems, Problems
Britain had not left! In fact they IGNORED the Treaty of Paris, and kept troops at frontier posts in American territory. you see they believed that the American government was weak and ineffective. http://www.glencoe.com/video_library/index_with_mods.php?PROGRAM=9780078777158&VIDEO=3050&CHAPTER=7&MODE=2 13 Independent States
Now what? Their experience with British rule made Americans very cautious. They did not want to give too much power to a single ruler. So what type of government? There are so many to choose from. In an attempt to prevent abuses of power in the states and keep the power in the hands of people state legislators were popularly elected, and elections were frequent. In most states, only white males who were at least 21 could vote. These citizens also had to own a certain amount of property or pay a certain amount of taxes. Some states allowed free African Americans to vote. The states further restricted the powers of governors, by making the legislatures the most powerful branch of government. Who can vote in today's elections?
How are things different?
Is it better or worse now? Establishing separate state governments was easy compared to forming a central government. They agreed the country should be a republic. Remember a republic is a government in which citizens rule through elected representatives. But, it was difficult for everyone to agree on the organization and powers of their new republic. The idea was that if the central government was weak then all the states would run like small independent countries, like the colonies had run. The states would act independently on almost all issues, working together with the central government only to wage war and handle relations with other nations. In 1776, the Second Continental Congress appointed a committee to draw up a plan for a new government. Delegates realized they needed the central government to coordinate the war effort against Britain. The congress adopted the committee's plan, the Articles of Confederation, in November of 1777. The Articles of Confederation were America's first constitution, and provided for a new central government under which the state gave up little of their power.
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