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Evidence Based Response

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by

Anne Ridgway

on 19 August 2014

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Transcript of Evidence Based Response

What is this type of writing all about?
Is this another ESSAY? AHAHA!

Evidence Based Response
Argumentative/opinion writing must advance a specific claim or claim(s) and provide strong and logical support, based solidly in text, for claims.
How Can I Write an Argumentative EBR?
Example of an EBR for Information

Research one of the locations and time periods from the informational texts provided (i.e. Spinelli’s 1950s Northeastern United States of America). Provide a detailed account of what daily life would have been like for a child your age from that local and time. Students should include examples from the text.
How Can I Write an Informational EBR?
Informative/Explanatory writing should focus on why literary and rhetorical choices are made by the author, and how those choices are intended to affect or impact the reader based solidly in text evidence .
What is an Informational EBR?
An Evidence Based Response should not be boring.
Utilize style and fluency!
-Did I produce a variety of sentences as far as simple, compound, complex, and cd-cx?
-Do my sentences begin in different ways?
-Do my sentences contain transitions when necessary?
-Does the writing have a nice easy flow where information is clear?
-Does the writing contain some literary devices such as personification, simile, metaphor, alliteration, consonance, etc…?
-Do my sentences contain excellent vocabulary that makes the reading enjoyable and relevant?
LAST...but not LEAST
Utilizing Style
Example of an EBR for Argument

Using evidence from three of the provided informational texts, explain the idea of “ever-changing adolescent identities” as they have been presented in the literature. Analyze how the societal expectations vary between the three chosen texts and why/how do you believe the social expectations changed? Students must support all claims with evidence from each of the three texts chosen.
How Can I Write an Argumentative EBR?
An evidence based response consists of a short concise piece of writing that explores a claim based on textual evidence.
The teacher gives you a prompt with a question or questions that allows you to consider a claim that has to be backed up from a text or texts.
This writing usually requires that you relate the document(s) to a historical period or theme or other information that shows your knowledge of major time periods, literature, and/or issues.
What is an EBR?
STEP ONE. Read the question carefully
Read the question more than once
Circle the tasks demanded of you
Also circle the terms that are unique to the question
Ask yourself what is it that you have to prove?
Pay special attention to economic, political, and social issues that need to be included
How Do You Write an EBR?
How Do You Write an EBR?
Step TWO: Read the document(s) very carefully.

Note similarities and differences between the document authors and topic.
What is the tension between the documents?
Is there bias?
Look for the point of view of the author of each document.
Look for the tone of each document (is there sarcasm? disdain? admiration?).
Look for change over time in the documents.
Look very carefully at the date of each document.
Look for possible solutions in the documents.
How Do You Write an EBR?
Step Three: Outside Information

Feel free to use outside information that you know in your commentary to back up your evidence.
Think of literature, articles, pictures, etc.. of anything else that may relate to this document.
Use this as inspiration when response to the EBR making sure that it relates to the topic.
How Do You Write an EBR?
Step Four: Claim
Make sure that your claim relates to the question(s) asked by your teacher.
How Do You Write an EBR?
Step Five: Write the Response
Your essay CAN look like the following outline!
No this is not a five paragraph essay!
Closer Look?
How Do You Write an EBR?
Step Six: After the Response is Written!
Your essay should be an analysis of the document(s) and the content.

You are demonstrating analysis if you are doing the following:
a. The essay contains a claim.
b. The document(s) are used as evidence to support your claim.
c. Frequent reference is made to the terms of the question.
d. Be certain that your answer is always focused directly on the question. Do not drift away from the question at hand.
Happppy writing!
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