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HEALTH COURSE: EATING DISORDERS

9th grade Health Course
by

A. Kotsev

on 9 October 2015

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Transcript of HEALTH COURSE: EATING DISORDERS

ANOREXIA NERVOSA
An unrealistic fear of weight gain
Self-starvation
Conspicuous distortion of body image
Obsession with becoming increasingly thinner
Limiting food intake to the point where health is compromised
MAY BE FATAL – highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder!!
Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia
&

Binge Eating Disorder
WHAT ARE SOME ANOREXIC BEHAVIORS YOU VIEWED?
WHAT DO YOU ALREADY KNOW ABOUT IT?
Facts & Characteristics
EATING DISORDERS
What are some physical symptoms of Anorexia that you noticed from the videos we watched?
Psychological Symptoms
WHAT HAPPENS TO BODY & MIND?
Depression & anxiety
Distorted Body Image
Obsessive Behavior
Substance abuse
Suicide
WITH FOOD?
WITH EXERCISE?
WITH THINKING PATTERNS?
Cut food into small pieces
Exercise excessively
Refuse to eat around other people
Use diet pills and/or laxatives
AT WHAT AGE DO EATING DISORDERS TYPICALLY BEGIN?
ARE THE INDIVIDUALS WHO DEVELOP ANOREXIA PREDOMINANTLY MALE OR FEMALE?
ARE ANOREXICS MOSTLY HIGH ACHIEVING WHITE WOMEN?
CHARACTERISTICS
BULIMIA NERVOSA
PERIODS OF BINGING & PURGING
NO CONTROL
laxatives
excessive exercise
Effects on the body & mind
What are the major differences between Anorexia & Bulimia?
Isabelle Caro
Jeremy Gillitzer
Individuals with the disease often have:

a distorted image of their bodies
changes in brain chemistry
psychiatric symptoms such as depression and/or anxiety
obsessive-compulsive disorder
alcohol or other substance abuse
can appear with average body weight
eat very little
excess control
under weight
periods of binging and purging
loss of control
can appear with normal body weight or overweight
Anorexia
Bulimia
cognitive behavioral therapy
psychotherapy
family therapy
supervision by a nutritionist
buddy system
self help
Treatment for Eating Disorders
HOW CAN WE PREVENT EATING DISORDERS?
Raise awareness
Overcome denial
Develop healthy coping skills
Deal with emotions & issues
Talk with friends & professionals
BINGE EATING DISORDER
eat abnormally large amounts of food
are out of control during the binges
do not purge
are often overweight or obese
affects almost as many males as females, who:
Who develops eating disorders?
Risk factors
DOES THE MEDIA PLAY A ROLE IN
THE DEVELOPMENT OF EATING DISORDERS? IN WHAT WAYS?

Social Factors include

Cultural attitudes or ideas about beauty and health
Media messages-seeing images of flawless thin people make it difficult to feel good about our bodies
Overprotective or disordered families (characterized by rigidity, conflict and inconsistency)
Side affect of practicing certain sports
Biological Factors include:

Genes & Hormones
Neurotransmitters (pleasure and appetite control center)
Psychological Factors include individuals who:

Tend to be perfectionists
Have unrealistic expectations and attitudes ('black and white'; 'all or nothing', and 'wrong or right' types of thinking)
Have anxiety disorder as child
Are constantly worried about weight and shape
Have a low self worth, or self-esteem
Have eating problems during infancy or childhood
Make frequent trips to the bathroom after meals
Have an obsession with calories and fat content of foods
Wear baggy clothes to hide body
shape and/or weight loss
Become socially isolated
People with Anorexia may:
HELPFUL RESOURCES:
http://teenshealth.org/teen/food_fitness/problems/eat_disorder.html#cat20135

http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/anorexia-nervosa.cfm

http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/bulimia-nervosa.cfm

http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/binge-eating-disorder.cfm
If you think you (or someone you know) may have a problem with an eating disorder, please contact a specialist, or the school psychologist.
HEALTHY DIET RECOMMENDATIONS:
choose good carbohydrates - whole grains (the less processed the better)

choose foods containing healthy fats. plant oils, nuts, and fish are the best choices. limit consumption of saturated fats, and avoid foods with trans fats

pay attention to the protein package: good choices include fish, poultry, nuts, and beans. try to avoid red meat

drink a lot of water

increase consumption of fruits and vegetables, and legumes, whole grains and nuts

eat a healthy breakfast every day

limit the intake of free sugars
Strict diets don't work for maintaining optimal body weight in the long run - adopting a healthy everyday diet does. The recommendations of the World Health Organization and other health associations are quite simple:
What happens in your brain?
Regulation of appetite
Centers of appetite - subcortical structures (paleocortex)
Neuromediators - ballance between serotonine and adrenergic receptors in the brain.
Feeling of fullness (enough food) - physiology

With prolonged time of dieting the body adjusts to lower food intake and feels full with less food.
Normal periods of growing and physiological weight gain.
Childhood
Puberty
Adolescence
Remember! Before diagnosing an eating disorder certain deseases should be ruled out.
Risk of other diseases:
Diabetes type 2
Heart diseases
Hypertension
Infertility
Depression
Full transcript