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The Night the Moon Fell Reading Street U4W4

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Cheryl Jacobs

on 23 February 2015

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Transcript of The Night the Moon Fell Reading Street U4W4

The Night the Moon Fell
a Mayan myth retold by Pat Mora
Unit 4 Week 4
Genre: Myth
A myth is a made up story that tries to
explain something that happens in
nature. A myth often has a theme or
big idea that may be a moral, or lesson,
shared by the author with readers.
Question of the Week:

Why are some changes difficult?
This week as we read
The Night the Moon Fell
, we
will think about the events in nature this story
tries to explain.

Syllable Patterns
CCSS L 2.2
Demonstrate command of the conventions
of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.

CCSS RF 2.3c
Decode regularly spelled two-syllable
words with long vowels.
This week we will divide words into
syllables by looking at different
vowel and consonant patterns.
basket
This word has two consonants in the
middle with a vowel on each side. We
divide it between the two consonants
and read the first syllable with a short
vowel.


bas
/
ket


tiger
This word has one consonant in the
middle with a vowel on each side. We
divide it after the first vowel and we
read that vowel with its long sound.


ti
/
ger

playground
In this word two vowels stand for one sound
in the first syllable, and two vowels stand for
one sound in the second syllable. Vowel
pairs that spell sounds stay together in their
own syllables.


play
/
ground

picnic

pic
/
nic
paper

pa
/
per
robot

ro
/
bot
magnet

mag
/
net
oatmeal
This word is a compound word.
You divide the word between the
two smaller words.


oat
/
meal

soybean

soy
/
bean
pencil

pen
/
cil

window

win
/
dow
peanut

pea
/
nut
blanket

blan
/
ket
daydream

day
/
dream
chapter

chap
/
ter
sailboat

sail
/
boat
frozen

fro
/
zen
railroad

rail
/
road
Spelling Words
CCSS L 2.2
Demonstrate command of the conventions of
standard English capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling when writing.

CCSS RF 2.3c
Decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with
long vowels.


downstairs football cowboy
houseboat railroad rainbow
boyhood oatmeal soybean
roadway outplay daydream

none hour

Vocabulary Words
CCSS RF 2.3f
Recognize and read grade-appropriate
irregularly spelled words.

balance
footing; even placement of weight that lets
someone stand upright

canyons
deep valleys with steep sides
coral
an underwater stony substance
made by marine life
rattle
make sharp knocking sounds as a
result of being shaken
slivers
small, thin pieces of something that
have been split off
sway
move back and forth or
side to side
whisper
make a soft sound
Amazing Words
CCSS L 2.6
Use words and phrases acquired through
conversations, reading and being read to, and
responding to texts.
adjust
get used to something new
landmark
an object, such as a tree or building, that
can help people find their way
unexpected
happens without warning or notice
quiver
to shake all over
tease
make fun of another person
in an unkind way
foreign
someone or something from outside
your own country
accent
the particular way people speak
English in other countries
Good day mate!
forlorn
lonely or sad
Plot and Theme
CCSS RL 2.1
Ask and answer questions such as who,
what, where, when, why, or how to
demonstrate understanding of key
details in a text.
The
plot
is what happens in the beginning,
middle, and end of a story. A story's
theme

is the "big idea" that the author wants the
reader to learn from the story. This can be
a moral lesson. Good readers pay attention
to the
plot
to help them deepen their
understanding of the text.
Visualizing
CCSS RL 2.1
Ask and answer such questions as who, what,
where, when, why, and how to demonstrate
understanding of key details in a text.

CCSS RL 2.7
Use information gained from the illustrations
and words in a print or digital text to
demonstrate understanding of its characters,
setting, or plot.
When we
visualize
we form pictures
in our minds about what happens in
a story or article. Good readers
picture how something looks, sounds,
feels, tastes, or smells when they
read. Picturing these details can help
you monitor and adjust as you read.

Make a picture, make a picture,
Make a picture in your mind.
When you're reading it should be
Like a movie in your mind.
This is called visualizing.
It helps you comprehend.
You will know the story then and
be a better reader. OH!
Make a picture, make a picture,
Make a picture in your mind.
When you're reading it should be
Like a movie in your mind.

Multiple Meaning Words
CCSS L 2.4
Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown
and multiple-meaning words and phrases
based on grade 2 reading and content,
choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.

CCSS L 2.4a
Use sentence-level context as a clue to the
meaning of a word or phrase.

CCSS RF 2.4c
Use context to confirm or self-correct word
recognition and understanding, rereading
as necessary.
Some words have more than one meaning.
Readers must use context clues to help
them figure out which meaning of the

multiple-meaning word
is being used.
bank
slip
skate
rattle
waves
fall
fly
note
light
Adverbs That Tell
When and Where

CCSS L 2.1e
Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose
between them depending on what is to
modified.
An
adverb
is a word that tells more about
a verb.
Adverbs
tell
when
,
where
, or
how

something happens.
Adverbs
can also
tell the order in which things happen.


Adverbs
That Tell
When


now later always
soon daily next
often first today
tomorrow last


Adverbs
That Tell
Where


inside there around
here outside up
down somewhere
everywhere
What is the
adverb
?
Does it tell
when
or
where
?

I saw the moon yesterday.
Astronauts walk there.
The moon fell yesterday.
It fell down to the sea.
Next the fish helped the moon.
Now they are friends.
Full transcript