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How do we hear?

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by

Kyle Sneed

on 30 July 2014

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Transcript of How do we hear?

How do we hear?
How does sound make it to our ear?
First, in order for us to hear a sound, the sound has to travel from the source to our ear. Sound travels in waves called

Sound

Waves
.
Sound

Waves

are the
vibrations
that travel through the air to reach our ears.
Here is what a
Sound

Wave
looks like..
What happens when the
s
ound wave
reaches our ear?
The
sound

wave
goes into our
ear through the opening called
the
ear canal
.
Once inside, the
sound

wave
enters the
middle ear
and
reaches the
eardrum
.
The Eardrum
The
sound wave
passes through the ear canal to the
eardrum
.
The Outer Ear
The first part of the
middle ear
is the
eardrum
. The
Eardrum's
job is to absorb the
sound wave
and then transferring it as
vibrations
to the heart of the
middle ear
.
The Middle Ear
The Inner Ear
The
eardrum
sends the
vibrations
to a series of three tiny attached bones.
The
sound vibrations
are
absorbed from the
eardrum
into the first bone, the
hammer
.


The
hammer
sends them to the
anvil
, which transfers them to the
final bone, the
stirrup
.
Each bone of the
middle ear

serves as an amplifier of the
sound vibrations
. They amplify
the sound as the carry it along to
the
inner ear
.
The
stirrup
sends the newly amplified
vibrations
into the
cochlea
.
The
cochlea
is the fluid filled,
coiled bony tube. This is where the
"hearing" happens.
To learn how the
cochlea
"hears" we will
have to take a look inside..
The Cochlea
The
Cochlea
has two main working parts:
Fluid
;
Hair Cells
.
The
Fluid
and
Hair Cells
are what allows the
Cochlea
to hear.
What does the
Fluid
do?
The
Fluid
is the medium for transferring the

sound vibrations
into Pressure Waves that then travel in the cochlea.
When the
sound vibrations
reach the
Cochlear

Fluids
they create changes,
(
+
)
increases and
(
-
)
decreases, in pressure. These pressure changes spread out and travel through the cochlea in the form of
Pres
sure
waves.
(
-
)
(
+
)
(
-
)
(
+
)
(
-
)
What do the
Hair Cells
do?
The
Hair

Cells
detect these pressure waves.
In some ways a Hair Cell acts like a tree: When a small
wind
blows a
tree
only a certain part of the tree bends and sways, the top and the branches. When a strong
wind
blows all of the
tree
bends and sways, the top, branches, and trunk.

So, when its a
low
sound that we hear only the
hairs
at the end of the
cochlea
move, when its a
high
sound the
hairs
at the beginning move.
The Cochlear Nerve
The cochlear nerve takes all the signals from the ear hairs to the brain.
The nerve travels all the way to the Auditory Cortex in the brain.
The Auditory Cortex
The
Auditory

Cortex
is the last step. Its where all
the information carried by the cochlear nerve is sent. Once
it arrives is processed into the sound that we hear.
And that...is How We Hear!
If the nerve somehow gets damaged, hearing loss can occur. This hearing loss means that the signal from the ear aren't reaching the brain.
Full transcript