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Poetry

poetry terms and examples
by

Kathleen Mulrine

on 19 September 2016

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Transcript of Poetry

Your guide to
Poetry
A poem's central or main idea that gives insight about life or human nature
Theme
Descriptive language that allows a reader to see, hear, feel, smell, and taste the scenes described in the work.
Imagery
A figure of speech that compares two unlike
things without using "like" or "as"
Metaphor
Simile
Sound Devices
Alliteration
Repetition
Rhyme Scheme
Rhythm
Onomatopoeia
the art of rhythmical composition, written or spoken, for exciting pleasure by beautiful, imaginative, or elevated thoughts.
Poetry
Language that is not intended to be understoodin the actual or real sense. Figurative language always makes use of a comparison between different things. By appealing to the imagination, figurative language provides new ways of looking at the world.
Figurative Language
A figure of speech comparing two unlike things using "like" or "as"
A figure of speech
comparing two
unlike things
The pattern of a poem that uses end rhyme
Repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words; gives emphasis to words
When a poet uses the same words or phrases again and again. The recurrence of sounds, words, phrases, lines, or stanzas
The pattern created by the arrangement of stressed and unstressed syllables. It gives poetry a musical quality that helps convey meaning.
The use of a word or phrase that actually imitates or suggests the sound of what it describes
Personification
An animal, object, or idea is given human form or characteristics
Form
A poem's appearance
Stanza
A group of lines forming a unit in a poem; the paragraphs of a poem
Free Verse
Poetry that has no fixed pattern of meter, rhyme, line length, or stanza arrangement
Narrative Poetry
A poem that tells a story
Mood
The atmosphere created by poem. It also relates to how the reader emotionally responds like sadness for a tragedy.
Example:
The Soul selects her own Society—
Then—shuts the Door—
To her divine Majority—
Present no more—

By Emily Bronte
Example
The winter evening settles down
With smell of steaks in passageways.
Six o'clock.
The burnt-out ends of smoky days.
And now a gusty shower wrapsThe grimy scraps
Of withered leaves about your feet
And newspapers from vacant lots;
The showers beat
On broken blinds and chimney-pots,
And at the corner of the street
A lonely cab-horse steams and stamps.
And then the lighting of the lamps.

T. S. Eliot
Example
"Tranquility"

Time slides
a gentle ocean
waves upon waves,
washing the shore,
loving the shore.
Example
Shrek: Ogres are like onions.
Donkey: They stink?
Shrek: Yes. No!
Donkey: They make you cry?
Shrek: No!
Donkey: You leave them out in the sun, they get all brown, start sprouting little white hairs.
Shrek: No! Layers! Onions have layers!

(Shrek, 2001)
Example
"Onomatopoeia every time I see ya
My senses tell me hubba
And I just can't disagree.
I get a feeling in my heart that I can't describe. . . .
It's sort of whack, whir, wheeze, whine
Sputter, splat, squirt, scrape
Clink, clank, clunk, clatter
Crash, bang, beep, buzz
Ring, rip, roar, retchTwang, toot, tinkle, thud
Pop, plop, plunk, pow
Snort, snuck, sniff, smack
Screech, splash, squish, squeak
Jingle, rattle, squeal, boing
Honk, hoot, hack, belch."

Todd Rundgren, "Onomatopoeia")
Example
"April Rain Song"  
 Let the rain kiss you
Let the rain beat upon your head with silver liquid drops
Let the rain sing you a lullaby
The rain makes still pools on the sidewalk
The rain makes running pools in the gutter
The rain plays a little sleep song on our roof at night
And I love the rain.

Langston Hughes
Example
tiger, tiger burning bright - a
in the forest of the night - a
what immortal hand or eye - b
could frame thy fearful symmetry - b

rhyme scheme: a-a-b-b
Example
"The Highwayman" by Alfred Noyes

THE wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees,     The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,    
The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor,     And the highwayman came riding—                      
Riding—riding—    
The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.
Symbol
When one thing stands for something else or means more than what it actually is
Example
“One Perfect Rose” by Dorothy Parker, 1926

A single flow'r he sent me, since we met.
All tenderly his messenger he chose;
Deep-hearted, pure, with scented dew still wet —
One perfect rose.
I knew the language of the floweret;
“My fragile leaves,” it said, “his heart enclose.”
Love long has taken for his amulet
One perfect rose.
Why is it no one ever sent me yet
One perfect limousine, do you suppose?
Ah no, it's always just my luck to get
One perfect rose.
Language intended to be understood as it is
Literal
Symbol
When a person, a place, object, or action stands for something else or means more than what it actually is.
Stanza
A group of lines forming a unit in a poem. Stanzas are the paragraphs of a poem
Example
“One Perfect Rose” by Dorothy Parker, 1926

A single flow'r he sent me, since we met.
All tenderly his messenger he chose;
Deep-hearted, pure, with scented dew still wet —
One perfect rose.
I knew the language of the floweret;
“My fragile leaves,” it said, “his heart enclose.”
Love long has taken for his amulet
One perfect rose.
Why is it no one ever sent me yet
One perfect limousine, do you suppose?
Ah no, it's always just my luck to get
One perfect rose.
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