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Copy of Chapter 9 Writing Across the Curriculum

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Loretta Moten

on 20 February 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Chapter 9 Writing Across the Curriculum

Chapter 9
Writing Across the Curriculum
Organizing Principle
Write to Read, Read to Write
Reading and Writing as Composing Processes
Reading and Writing as Exploration, Motivation and Clarification
Writing to Learn (WTL)
Microthemes
POVGs (Point of View Guide)
Unsent Letters
Biopoems
Admit Slips and Exit Slips
Chapter 9
Writing Across the Curriculum
Pages 280-290
By Loretta Moten

Write to Read, Read to Write
The reading-writing
connection
draws upon students'
prior knowledge
and
cognitive
processes
.
(Moss and Lapp, 2012)
Reading and writing: help us to understand:
what we
already
know;
what we
don't think
we know that we actually
do
know;
what we don't know until we engage in the process of
meaning making




Reading and Writing as Composing Processes
Reading and writing are both acts of
composing
because
readers
and
writers
are involved in an ongoing dynamic

process of constructing
meaning.
The writer works to make a
text
sensible and the
reader
works to make sense from the text.
Both
reading
and
writing
involve purpose, commitment, schema activation,
planning
, working with
ideas
, revision and
rethinking
and monitoring.
Several broad conclusions have been made between reading and writing:
Good
readers are often good writers and vice versa; students who write well tend to
read
more than those who don't write well; wide reading
improves
writing; and students who are good readers and writers are more likely to
engage
in reading and writing on their own.
When reading and writing are taught together,
problem solving
, thinking and learning are more
powerful
than if they were engaged in
separately
.
Reading and Writing as Exploration, Motivation, and Clarification
Writing may be used as a
motivationa
l tool to catapult students into reading, when teachers
integrate
, writing and reading; the writing assists the students in
thinking
about what they
will
read and
understanding
what they
have
read.
Writers engage in a process of
exploration
and
clarification
as they go about the task of of
making meaning
.
Students who experience the
integration
of
writing
and
reading
are likely to
learn
more content
, to understand
it better, and to
remember
it longer
.
The more writers tend to

work with
ideas
they put on
paper
or a
screen
, the more they will be able to
revise, rethink
and
clarify
what they want to say about a subject.
Writing to Learn (WTL)
WTL instructional activities are
short
and informal writing tasks and the writings produced are often
unfinished
and tentative. WTL activities are used before reading to help students tap into
prior knowledge
and relate it to what they will be learning about. WTL activities are also used
after
reading to help students
summarize
and
extend
their
thoughts
about a subject.

A
variety
of instructional activities may be used for
WTL
, including microthemes, point of view guides (POVGs), unsent letters, biopoems, and admit/exit slips.



Quiz
True or False
1. Reading and writing have nothing to do with each other and each one should be taught independent of the other.

2. Microthemes may be referred to as "mini-essays".

3. WTL activities can only be used for language arts classes.

4. POVGs and unsent letter activities encourage students to role-play.

5. Biopoems are very narrow in their scope of reflection of material.
Organizing Principle
Pages 280-290
Academic writing can be an
intimidating
process, but it is an
indispensable tool
for thinking and learning in content classrooms.
Writing
activates learning by helping students to
explore
, clarify, and
think
deeply about ideas and concepts they encounter in reading.
When reading and writing are taught together,
content learning
occurs in ways not possible when students
read
without writing and
write
without reading.
Microthemes can be assigned for
various
purposes, such as
analyzing
and synthesizing information and ideas encountered in reading, writing a
summary
or taking a stand on an important issue. They are like mini-essays and are often done on an index card and used as "
study cards
" for the unit tests.
POVGs are in
interview
format; they encourage speculation,
inferential thinking
, and elaboration thru
role-play
; engage students by having them actively contribute their own experiences to the role; requires
first-person
writing by the student as they respond to a situation; usually results in more informal,
playful language.
Unsent Letters are a
non-threatening
way to have students
demonstrate
their knowledge by having them role-play and
write letters
in response to material they are studying; requiring the student to engage in
interpretive
and
evaluative
thinking.
Biopoems help students
organize,
review and summarize what they have learned in a concise and
creative
manner; require students to reflect on
large
amounts of material within a
poetic
form; follows a
pattern
that helps writers to
synthesize
what they have learned about people, places or events under study.
Admit slips are
brief
comments written by students on index cards at the beginning of class; they are used to have students
react
to what they are studying or to what's happening in class.
Exit slips
are like admit slips but they are used at the
end
of class as a way of summarizing and/or bring
closure
to what was learned.
Microthemes
Point of View Guides
POVGs

Unsent Letters
Biopoems
Admit & Exit Slips
Full transcript