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Science Communication

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by

Erik Stengler

on 29 October 2014

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Transcript of Science Communication

Science Communication in Context
Scientific community
Communicators
Social
Scientists
Scientists who´d rather not get involved
Active scientists who are good communicating and do so when they can.
Scientists who do full-time science communication
Journalists and the media
Drivers
Economic
Cultural
Social
Democratic
...
From PUS to PE
Public Understanding of Science
Science Literacy
Public Awareness of Science
Public Engagement (with Science)
Public Participation in Science

Audiences
Dialogue

Impact - Evaluation
Story tellers
For entertainment
To share a passion
...
PR & Marketing
History
Research Councils & Instirutions
Types of science communication
Audiovisual science communication
(Broadcasting Science)
Radio and TV
News
Reports
Interviews
Documentaries
Youtube snippets
Filmmaking

Presential science communication
(Hands-on Science Communication)
Shows
Demonstrations
Exhibitions
Guided walks
...
Written science communication
Books
Articles
Press releases
Blogs
...
(Public) Outreach
Knowledge Exchange
Informal Education
Knowledge Mobilisation
The Players
Journalists

Research in Media studies
Science communicators

Science communication scholars
Media studies
Focus on science reporting
Spin-off of political reporting
Has its own ideas and theories:
normative theories: how things should be -> Scientists and Sci-comm scholars
operational theories: how and why things are -> Journalism scholars
Friction, e.g
Plesner, 2013
Pragmatic & contemporary issues -> News media,
especially newspapers - very little specifically on radio
... continued in Gregory and Miller (1998)
Additional focus on "popular science broadcasting"
On practial matters & mostly on TV (most popular by far, 54% of people; PAS 2011),
e.g, Gregory and Miller (1998; p 104)
Brake and Weitkamp (2010; p 105)
Bowater and Yeoman (2013; p 232)

Wiseman (1996)

Again, recurring themes are the journalist-scientist friction, as in
Fayard (1988)
Scanlon, Whitelegg and Yates (1999)

.. and in the contextof broadcasting, the solution of storytelling,
e.g. Deehan (in Evered and O'Connor, 1987, p.88)
Olson (2009)
History
Beginnings of radio and cinema newsreels became new media science in the 1920s (Gregory and Miller 1998, p.29)

... continued in León (1999)
Full transcript