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The Republic of Texas

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Carley Behrend

on 31 October 2013

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Transcript of The Republic of Texas

Visual Presentation
http://misslandro.edu.glogster.com/the-republic-of-texas
The Republic of Texas
By: Carley Behrend, Kristen Carignan, Sofieh Hasanin, Julia Landro, &Nicole Vomberg
Time Line
Lesson Plan
Hands On Activity
Maps
References:
Method used: Glogster
http://popplet.com/app/#/1367502
Website Used: Popplet
Website Used: www.teacherspayteachers.com
Successes, Problems, and Organization of the Republic of Texas
Recognition By Other Nations
France, Belgium, and Netherlands were the only three European nations to recognize Texas as a sovereign nation.
United States: 1831
France: September 25,1839
Great Britain and Mexico never recognized independence.

First President
Relationship With The United States
Texas Rangers
Started in 1823 by Moses Morrison under the authority of Stephen F. Austin (under Mexican Law) to deal with Indian raids

Companies volunteered and disbanded as needed

"Ride like a Mexican, trail like an Indian, shoot like a Tennesseean, and fight like the devil."

Events Leading To The Annexation Of Texas to the United States (Issues with Mexico)
1844-James polk is elected President of the United States and advocates the annexation of Texas

The United States was feared England's connection with Texas and the idea of the British having such a strong influence so close to home.

A Congressional resolution to annex Texas was signed in the United States and sent to Texas. It was very generous.

On July 16, 1845, four months after receiving it, Texas Congress accepts U.S. offer of annexation.


Relations with Indians
Under Houston, in both his terms, there was peace and trade with the Indians

Lamar believed that“The white man and the red man cannot dwell in harmony together. Nature forbids it.”
What was his solution? “It is to push a rigorous war against them to their hiding places without mitigation or compassion.”


Mexican-American War (issues, events, outcome, MAP)
August 1846- Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna returns from exile to lead Mexico.
Santa Anna returns to Mexico to deal with a revolt, while the U.S. recruits more Americans to fight.
10/1847-Santa Anna resigns from presidency and is sentenced to exile in Jamaica.
2/2/1848-Negotiators sign Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
3/10/1848- Treaty was ratified by U.S. Senate
5/25/1848-Treaty was ratified by Mexican Senate
Texas Constitution
David Thomas is the “father of the Texas Constitution”

On 17 March 1836, the constitution was adopted.

Similarities to United States:
Three branches, checks and balances, slavery, citizenship (not for blacks or Indians – prohibited foreign slave trade), male suffrage, method of amendment

Important Historical Documents
Economic Struggles
Constant war with Mexico and the Indian tribes was very expensive.

The Republic was in debt from the moment it declared independence and remained in debt.

President Lamar issued the Texas Dollar or “redbacks” as currency – within 3 years they had no value

Meusebach-Comanche Treaty
Sam Houston was the first elected President of Texas
John O. Meusebach, Buffalo Hump (head chief) and Santa Anna agreed to a treaty where unarmed settlers were allowed in, Indians were allowed to interact with settlers, and the settlers paid the Indians $1,000 to survey the land for them.

This treaty alone opened up more than 3 million acres of land.
Content Objective

The student will describe the successes, problems, and organizations of the Republic of Texas such as the establishment of a constitution, economic struggles, relations with American Indians, and the Texas Rangers by writing their research in a premade foldable.



TEKS
4th Grade Social Studies
3) History. The student understands the importance of the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas, and the annexation of Texas to the United States. The student is expected to:
(D) describe the successes, problems, and organizations of the Republic of Texas such as the establishment of a constitution, economic struggles, relations with American Indians, and the Texas Rangers;
ELPS
Writing:
(G) narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Description of Activity
The students will complete a foldable (visual shown on hands on activity section) answering questions about The Republic of Texas after the teacher has read to the students the two books used for this unit. (Books to be shown on book section). This activity would take two days to complete since the teacher will be reading two separate books to the student.
Relations between Texas and the US were strong. Texas had become unstable and unfit to fully defend or sustain itself, prompting the US to consider annexation. Upon annexation, Mexico declared war on the US.

Adler, D. A., Adler, M. S., & Collins, M. (2012). A picture book of Sam Houston. New York: Holiday House.
Avalon Project - The Treaty of Annexation - Texas; April 12, 1844. (n.d.). Avalon Project - The Treaty of Annexation - Texas; April 12, 1844. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/texan05.asp
Battles of the War. (n.d.). PBS. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://www.pbs.org/kera/usmexicanwar/war/entrance_to_city_of_mexico.html Bird's Fort Treaty Ratification Proclamation, 1843. (n.d.). - Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from https://www.tsl.state.tx.us/treasures/indians/birds-01.html
Constitution of the Republic of Texas 1836. (n.d.). Constitution of the Republic of Texas 1836. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://www.tamu.edu/faculty/ccbn/dewitt/texascon.htm
HOUSTON, SAMUEL. (n.d.). KRENECK, THOMAS H.. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fho73
Historical Events by Year. (n.d.). Today in History, Birthdays & History Articles. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://www.historyorb.com/events-by-year.php
Mexican War: Chronology of Events and Battles. (n.d.). Mexican War: Chronology of Events and Battles. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://www.robinsonlibrary.com/america/unitedstates/1783/1846/chronology.htm
Republic of Texas. (n.d.). Wiki Media. Retrieved October 29, 2013, from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/26/Wpdms_republic_of_texas-2008-19-11.svg/300px-Wpdms_republic_of_texas-2008-19-11.svg.png
Republic of Texas Fold-Up. (n.d.). Teachers Pay Teachers. Retrieved October 30, 2013, from http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Republic-of-Texas-Fold-Up-686703
Books Used
Spradlin, M. P., & Munro, R. (2008). Texas Rangers: legendary lawmen. New York: Walker & Co..
Tehuacana Creek Treaty. (n.d.). Tehuacana Creek Treaty. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://www.indians.org/welker/liptrea1.htm
Texas 1836. (n.d.). Modular Building Associates. Retrieved October 29, 2013, from http://www.modularbuildingassociates.com/Texas1836map.jpg
Texas. (n.d.). Map Us. Retrieved October 29, 2013, from http://earlytexashistory.com/Tx1836/tx1836mapusmt.jpg
Texas Almanac - The Source For All Things Texan Since 1857. (n.d.). Revolution and the Republic of Texas. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://www.texasalmanac.com/topics/history/revolution-and-republic-texas
Texas Timeline (Key Events in early Texas). (n.d.). Texas Timeline (Key Events in early Texas). Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://www.lsjunction.com/events/events.htm
Texian Independence Convention at Washington 1836. (n.d.). Texian Independence Convention at Washington 1836. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://www.tamu.edu/faculty/ccbn/dewitt/consultations6.htm
The Treaties of Velasco. (n.d.). - Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from https://www.tsl.state.tx.us/treasures/republic/velasco-01.html
U.S. Mexican War. (n.d.). PBS. Retrieved October 27, 2013, from http://www.pbs.org/kera/usmexicanwar/timeline_flash.html
World Quote. (n.d.). James K. Polk Quotes, President of USA ~. Retrieved October 29, 2013, from http://worldquote.blogspot.com/2011/02/james-k-polk-quote.html
Texas Declaration of Independence was enacted at Washington-on-the-Brazos on March 2, 1836, effectively creating the Republic of Texas.
The Treaties of Velasco 1836: provided that hostilities would cease and that Santa Anna would withdraw his forces below the Rio Grande and not take up arms again against Texas.
Bird's Fort Treaty Ratification Proclamation, 1843 Sam Houston made Indian policy: to treat with any and all Indians on the Frontiers of Texas.
The Treaty of Annexation: The people of Texas having, at the time of adopting their constitution, expressed by an almost unanimous vote, their desire to be incorporated into the Union of the United States.
Tehuacana Creek Treaty October 9, 1844: Between the Republic of Texas and the Comanche, Keechi, Waco, Caddo, Anadarko, Ioni, Delaware, Shawnee, Cherokee, Lipan and Tawakoni tribes of Indians, concluded and signed at Tehuacana Creek: both parties are now willing to open the path of lasting peace, friendship and trade, and are desirous to establish certain solemn rules for the regulation of their mutual intercourse:
Treaty of Hidalgo 1848: an official end to the Mexican-American War & Mexico relinquished all claims to Texas and recognized the Rio Grande as the southern boundary with the United States.
The land between the Llano and Colorado rivers was given to settlers with the requirement that they settle and survey the land by fall of 1847, but the land was already Comanche hunting grounds.
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