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General Motors Strike

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parker oliver

on 24 March 2017

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Transcript of General Motors Strike

General Motors Strike
By:Parker Oliver
Workers Perspective on Current Strike
The workers went on strike because they wanted to win recognition of the United Auto Workers as the only bargaining agent for General Motors workers. They also wanted to stop the company from sending work to non-union plants. Other things they wanted was fair minimum wages, a grievance system, and procedures that would keep workers safe from injury in the assembly-line. On December 30th the workers locked themselves in the building and went on strike.
Business Owners Perspective on Current Strike
The business owners perspective was very stubborn and they did not want to change anything for the workers because they wanted to give the workers minimum wages, they also did not want to put in a grievance system because they didn't care about the workers complaints. Some things the business owners did to prevent the strike was turning off the heat of the GM building, forcing the strikers to sit in cold. They also tried to have the police cut off their food supply along with filing a court order saying the strike was illegal and trespassing.
Workers Perspective of the Homestead Strike
The Workers went on strike because they felt like they were being given too low of wages so they couldn't support their family, harsh unsafe and unhealthy working conditions, and they also felt like they were working too long of hours. Because of these reasons, on June 30th, the workers of the Carnegie Steel Company went on strike.
Business Owners Perspective of the Homestead Strike
Henry Frick, who is the chairman of the Carnegie Steel Company did not want to give the workers more money and shorter hours because he was a very ambitious greedy man. Frick wanted all the money too himself and wasn't parting with his decision. Because of this, when the workers went on strike, he turned to violence and had the Pinkerton Guards come in and stop the strike, which turned very violent.

Compare and Contrast Both Strikes
Homestead Strike
General Motors Strike
This strike was very violent and the workers ended up dying, and people were more drastic in striking and risked their lives.
This strike was not violent and no one died, there were also a 5% raise unlike the Homestead Strike.
They both were sit in strikes where they would just stay at the building until they got what they deserve.
Outcome of General Motors Strike
The outcome of this strike was that the plants could reopen. In mid-February, the automaker signed an agreement with the UAW. Among other things, the workers were given a 5 percent raise and permission to speak in the lunchroom. So overall they got what they pro tested for and it was worth it because there was so casualties.
Outcome of Homestead Strike
The strike ended on November 20, 1892. With the Amalgamated Association virtually destroyed, Carnegie Steel moved quickly to institute longer hours and lower wages. The Homestead strike inspired many workers, but it also underscored how difficult it was for any union to fight against the combined power of the corporation and the government. But they got what they were passionate for.
Works Cited
"Homestead Strike." History.com, 2009, www.history.com/topics/homestead-strike. Accessed 23 Mar. 2017.
"Sit-Down Strike Begins in Flint." History.com, A+E Networks, 2010, www.history.com/this-day-in-history/sit-down-strike-begins-in-flint.
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