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Conjunctions

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sylvie saad

on 26 February 2014

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Transcript of Conjunctions

Conjunctions
COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS


EX) for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so
Coordinating conjunctions join equals to one another:
words to words,
EX) Most children like cookies AND milk.
phrases to phrases,
EX) The gold is hidden at the beach OR by the lakeside.
clauses to clauses.
EX) What you say AND what you do are two different things.
Coordinating conjunctions go in between items joined, not at the beginning or end.
EX)
Incorrect
:
But
I don't like tea, I like coffee.
Correct
: I like coffee,
but
I don't like tea.



CORRELATIVE CONJUNCTIONS
either. . .or both. . . and
neither. . . nor not only. . . but also

Each correlative words should be places
immediatly

before
the words to be connected.
EX) I like
both
rabbits
and
parrots.

I like
neither
rabbits
nor
parrots.

I will
either
feed the rabbit
or
feed the parrot.



SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS


after
in order (that)
unless
although
insofar as
until
as
in that
when
as far as
lest

Conjunction Junction
What Are Conjunctions?

Conjunctions are used to join words or groups of words together.
Different kinds of conjunctions join different kinds of grammatical structures.

The following are the kinds of conjunctions:

A. COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS

B. CORRELATIVE CONJUNCTIONS

C. CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS

D. SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS


When a coordinating conjunction joins two words, phrases, or subordinate clauses, no comma should be placed before the conjunction.


EX)
Words
: Cookies and milk.

Phrases
: at the beach or by the lakeside.

Subordinate

clauses
: what you say and what you do.
A coordinating conjunction joining two independent clauses creates a compound sentence and requires a comma before the coordinating conjunction

EX)
Tom ate all the peanuts, so Phil ate the cookies.

I don't care for the beach, but I enjoy a good vacation in the mountains.


CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS
after all
in addition
next
also
incidentally
nonetheless
as a result
indeed
on the contrary
besides
in fact
on the other hand
consequently
in other words



finally
instead
still
for example
likewise
then
furthermore
meanwhile
therefore
hence
moreover
thus
however
nevertheless
otherwise
These conjunctions join independent clauses together.


EX)
The tire was flat; therefore, we called a service station.

It was a hot day; nevertheless, roofers worked on the project all day.


whenever
as soon as
no matter how
where
as if
now that
wherever
as though
once
whether
because
provided (that)

while
before
since
why
even if
so that
even though
supposing (that)
how
than
if
that
inasmuch as
though
in case (that)
till
These words are commonly used as subordinating conjunctions


Quiz
1. What are conjunctions?
2. Write a sentence using a coordinating conjunction.
3. True or False. Coordinating conjunctions go in between items joined, or at the beginning or end.
Combine the following sentences into one sentence using paired conjunctions: both ... and; not only ... but also; either ... or; neither ... nor.
4. We could fly. We could go by train.
5. It might rain tomorrow. It might snow tomorrow.




Answers:
1. Conjunctions are used to join words or groups of words together.
2. Most children like cookies AND milk.
3. FALSE. Coordinating conjunctions go in between items joined,
not
at the beginning or end.
4. Either we could fly or we could go by train.
5. It might both rain and snow tomorrow.
Subordinating conjunctions also join two clauses together, but in doing so, they make one clause dependent (or "subordinate") upon the other.

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