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American Government Unit 4: The Executive: Dream Job or Nightmare?

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Erik Love

on 3 October 2014

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Transcript of American Government Unit 4: The Executive: Dream Job or Nightmare?

Conflict Resolution
Individuals, Groups, and Institutions
Rule of Law
The Executive:
Dream Job or Nightmare?
FIRST: Read about these standards in your Textbook
Check out page: 131
FIRST: Read about these standards in your Textbook
Check out pages: 240-247
Impeachment Process: SSCG14
Various Roles of the Presidency: SSCG12, 20
FIRST: Read about these standards in your Textbook
Check out page: 250
Decisions of Clinton/Johnson SSCG14b
FIRST: Read about these standards in your Textbook
Check out pages: 240-241
Characteristics common to past presidents: SSCG13b
FIRST: Read about these standards in your Textbook
Check out pages: 249-259
Structures/Powers of Executive SSCG4a, 17a
FIRST: Read about these standards in your Textbook
Check out page: 241
Requirements for the President SSCG13a
SSCG14 The student will explain the impeachment process and its usage for elected officials.
a. Explain the impeachment process as defined in the U.S. Constitution.
b. Describe the impeachment proceedings of Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton.
SSCG12 The student will analyze the various roles played by the President of the United States; include Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, chief executive, chief agenda setter, representative of the nation, chief of state, foreign policy leader, and party leader.
SSCG20 The student will describe the tools used to carry out United States foreign policy (diplomacy; economic, military, and humanitarian aid; treaties; sanctions and military intervention).
SSCG13 The student will describe the qualifications for becoming President of the United States.
b. Describe unwritten qualifications common to past presidents.
SSCG13 The student will describe the qualifications for becoming President of the United States.
a. Explain the written qualifications for President of the United States.
SSCG14 The student will explain the impeachment process and its usage for elected officials.
b.Describe the impeachment proceedings of Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton.
SSCG4 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the organization and powers of the national government.
a. Describe the structure and powers of the legislative, executive, and judicial
branches.
SSCG17 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the organization and powers of state and local government described in the Georgia Constitution.
a. Examine the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.
The student will understand that in a democracy, rule of law influences the behavior of citizens, establishes procedures for making policies, and limits the power of government.
The student will understand that when there is conflict between or within societies, change is the result.
The student will understand that the actions of individuals, groups, and/or institutions affect society through intended and unintended consequences.
http://prezi.com/7anwvsrs3tpu/unit-5-executive-branch/
so you can prezi while you prezi...
On February 24, 1868, something extraordinary happened in the U.S. Congress. For the first time in history, the United States House of Representatives impeached a sitting president, Democrat Andrew Johnson. Now, Johnson faced trial before the U. S. Senate. If convicted, he would be removed from office.

Vice President Johnson had assumed office after John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln, on April 15, 1865. He was a Union man, but his roots were in the South. "This is a country for white men," he had reportedly declared, "and as long as I am president, it shall be a government for white men." Johnson had failed to win favor with the Radical Republicans. The radicals, who included men like Thaddeus Stevens and Benjamin Butler, wanted to guarantee the rights of the freedmen. One way they tried to do so was by passing the Reconstruction Acts, laws that provided suffrage to freed slaves and prevented former Southern rebels from regaining control of the state governments.

Believing the Acts to be wrong and unconstitutional, Johnson repeatedly blocked their enforcement. He repeatedly gave pardons to ex-Rebels. He hampered military commanders' efforts to block the rise of Southern leaders to power. In frequent speeches and interviews, Johnson publicly expressed his defiance of the Radical Republicans. They knew that their program for reconstruction of the South could not succeed with Andrew Johnson in office.

The final blow came after the passage of the Tenure of Office Act in 1867. This law made it impossible for the president to dismiss important government officials without the permission of the Senate. In a move than infuriated Congressmen, Johnson defied the act.

The president had long wanted to dismiss the Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton. Stanton was the only member of Johnson's cabinet who supported the Radical Republicans' program for reconstruction. On August 12, Johnson suspended Stanton. In his place, Johnson appointed the popular General Ulysses S. Grant Secretary of War. By doing so, Johnson hoped to challenge the constitutionality of the Tenure of Office Act.

When Congress reconvened, they overruled Stanton's suspension, and Grant resigned his position. The event heightened Grant's popularity and depressed Johnson's -- at least as far as Republicans were concerned. Ignoring Congress, Johnson formally dismissed Stanton on February 21, 1868. With the support of the Republicans, Stanton responded by locking himself in his office and refusing to leave.

Angered by Johnson's open defiance, the House of Representatives formally impeached him on February 24 by a vote of 126 to 47. They charged him with violation of the Tenure of Office Act and bringing into "disgrace, ridicule, hatred, contempt, and reproach the Congress of the United States." It was then up to the Senate to try Johnson.

Johnson's trial began on March 4th and continued for 11 grueling weeks. During that long period, the president's enemies had time to reconsider the Stanton dismissal. Many of them were impressed with Johnson's good b ehavior during the trial. Johnson also took action to save himself. He promised to enforce the Reconstruction Acts and to give no more speeches attacking Congress. He also appointed a man well liked by most Republicans, General John M. Schofield, as the new Secretary of War.

On May 16, 1868, President Johnson escaped removal from office by just one vote. For the remainder of his time in office, he continued to veto reconstruction bills, but Congress overrode his vetoes. The Radical Republicans' program for reconstruction continued. In 1868, the Republican candidate, General Ulysses S. Grant, won the presidency.
Johnson's Impeachment:
From: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/general-article/grant-impeachment/
Clinton's Impeachment:
From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impeachment_of_Bill_Clinton
This one is actually pretty complicated...following, you can read Wikipedia's summary of the impeachment. Click the link above to read about Clinton's impeachment in its entirety.

Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, was impeached by the House of Representatives on two charges, one of perjury and one of obstruction of justice, on December 19, 1998. Two other impeachment articles, a second perjury charge and a charge of abuse of power, failed in the House. He was acquitted of both charges by the Senate on February 12, 1999.
Independent Counsel Ken Starr alleged that Clinton had broken the law during his handling of the Lewinsky scandal and the Paula Jones lawsuit. Four charges were considered by the full House of Representatives; only two passed, and those on a nearly party-line vote. It was only the second time in history that the House had impeached the President of the United States, and only the third that the full House had considered such proceedings.
The trial in the United States Senate began right after the seating of the 106th Congress, in which the Republicans began with 55 senators. A two-thirds majority (67 senators) was required to remove Clinton from office. Fifty senators voted to remove Clinton on the obstruction of justice charge and 45 voted to remove him on the perjury charge; no Democrat voted guilty on either charge.
Foreign policy is a government's strategy in dealing with other nations.
DID YOU KNOW?
America over $30,000,000,000 PER YEAR away to other countries
GIVES
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/spc/multimedia/military-spending/
DID YOU KNOW?
America about 100 countries over $1,000,000 each year?
GIVES
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/07/09/the-u-s-gives-egypt-1-5-billion-a-year-in-aid-heres-what-it-does/
DID YOU KNOW?
America has Egypt over $70,000,000,000?!?!
GIVEN
some countries have received EVEN MORE $$$
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_governments_by_development_aid
But who gives the most?
http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_world_/2014/04/09/new_oecd_figures_the_surprising_country_that_gives_the_most_foreign_aid.html
How much do you think America gives?
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/11/07/the-budget-myth-that-just-wont-die-americans-still-think-28-percent-of-the-budget-goes-to-foreign-aid/
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