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Interesting

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by

Leonardo Zamorano

on 10 October 2017

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Transcript of Interesting

Interesting

Etymologies
Avocado
(noun): a pear-shaped fruit with a rough leathery skin, smooth oily edible flesh, and a large stone
The word for avocado comes from the Aztec word, "ahuacatl," which means testicle. Aside from the similar shape, avocados also act as aphrodisiacs, foods that stimulate sex drive.
Robot
BONUS
The modern English name is not etymologically related to the similar-sounding Spanish word abogado, meaning 'lawyer' (as in advocate), but comes through an English rendering of the Spanish aguacate as avogato.
Because the word avogato sounded like "advocate", several languages reinterpreted it to have that meaning. French uses avocat, which also means lawyer, and "advocate"-forms of the word appear in several Germanic languages, such as the (now obsolete) German Advogato-Birne, the old Danish advokat-pære (today it is called "avocado") and the Dutch advocaatpeer.
(noun): a machine capable of carrying out a complex series of actions automatically, especially one programmable by a computer
The word "robot" comes from the Czech word "robota," meaning "forced labor" — which sounds strangely like slavery.
A scene from Karel Čapek's 1920 play R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots), showing three robots.
The word robot was introduced to the public by the Czech interwar writer Karel Čapek in his play R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots), published in 1920.
The play begins in a factory that uses a chemical substitute for protoplasm to manufacture living, simplified people called robots. The play does not focus in detail on the technology behind the creation of these living creatures, but in their appearance they prefigure modern ideas of androids, creatures who can be mistaken for humans. These mass-produced workers are depicted as efficient but emotionless, incapable of original thinking and
indifferent to self-preservation.
Difference between billion and bilón
Billon (Am) is the equivalent of a thousand million.





1,000,000,000
Billón (Español) es un millon de millones.
1,000,000,000,000

Thank you
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