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Importance of the Declaration of Independence

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Trent Rasmussen

on 30 November 2015

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Transcript of Importance of the Declaration of Independence

Below, delegates of the Second Continental Congress present the Declaration of Independence for signing. This picture can now be found in the US Capitol Rotunda.
...that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights...
The Signing
In Your Own Words: Declaring Independence
Signer Spotlight: John Hancock
When a government violates
Natural Laws
of a group in its country, the violated group has the right to separate. As a human being, these people need to make known to the world the causes for separation.

The following truths are known by all: that all men are created equal; God has given them rights that can never be taken away which are the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Governments are put in
place to protect these rights and if they don't, citizens have the right to either change or end the current government. They have this right because government get their power from the approval of the people. If needed, they can then start a new government that protects their rights. The King of Great Britain has continually hurt us, taking away our liberties and
oppressing
us with his rule. We will not stand for this behavior.
John Hancock was a powerful figure before, during, and after the Revolutionary War. He was considered among the richest men in New England, President of the Continental Congress, and Governor of Massachusetts. When he signed the Declaration, Hancock signed in his flamboyant style, making his signature the most prominent. Legend has it he signed like that so "King George will be able to read that!"
$0.25
July 5th, 1776
Philadelphia Evening Post
Why not US?
Importance of the Declaration of Independence
What does the Declaration mean to me?
Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. These are all rights that most people around the world would agree should be protected. For Americans, the protection of these rights started in the Declaration of Independence. When American colonists felt these rights were being violated by King George III and the British Parliament, they wanted to stand up for what they believed their Creator had granted them; primarily this refers to the above three rights.

The Declaration of Independence set America apart and not only declared independence, but also promised serve higher ideals. July 4th, 1776 has been and always will be the most special date in American history. When America faces challenges, the superior ideals found in this document has, is, and will be the guiding light of our country's destiny.
The written word is an extraordinary way to communicate powerful messages. The words contained within the Declaration stir deep-seated emotions that produce pride, loyalty, and honor towards my country. I believe that "we are endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness."
Unalienable
means my government can't take these rights away. Ever. Although our government and our nation's history is far from perfect, the ideals set forth to guide America make it a special place. If the Declaration was never written, I'm afraid to think about the government that would've developed in America. However, I am sad that Thomas Jefferson let his condemnation of slavery be deleted during editing. If he didn't, maybe slavery would've ended then and there. But most of all, the Declaration of Independence inspires me to be a better citizen. It inspires me to strive to be greater. It inspires me to protect the ideals our Founding Fathers wanted our country to cherish forever.
SPECIAL: Declaration of Independence
Favorite Quote
Citations
http://goo.gl/hdc4W7
Full transcript