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Intro - Arts Marketing: Theory and Practice: Spring 2015

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Maggie Guggenheimer

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Transcript of Intro - Arts Marketing: Theory and Practice: Spring 2015

Arts Marketing: Theory and Practice
ARAD 5050
Introduction and
Class Logistics
Why we're here, where we're going, and what to expect along the way.

Let's start with introductions.
Contact info
Class Agenda
10:00-10:15 – 3 deep breaths, announcements & housekeeping
10:15- 11:15 – Class discussion (readings, case review, SWOTs, group work, etc.)
11:15-11:30 – Break / shares
11:3o-12:15 – Guest lecture
12:15-12:30 – Closing Q&A

Readings Overview
Course Reading Packet
Fundamentals of Arts Management
Museum Marketing & Strategy
Standing Room Only
The New Rules of Marketing & PR
The Tipping Point
To Sell Is Human
Invitation to the Party
Additional Bits
E-newsletters
Social media examples
Print marketing materials
Blog posts
Videos
Website examples
Research reports
Good content from the web
About you
Your name, major, and class year
Experiences you've had that might be considered marketing
Area(s) of the arts you know most about
Activities, groups, organizations, etc. with which you're involved and how
Related experiences (training, work, volunteer, intern)
Your social media, blog, other online presence
Why you're here -- what's your goal?
Joanne Scheff Bernstein
Assignments
Participation
5 Response Assignments
4 Case Studies
Group Project: Presentation and Marketing Plan
Participation Guidelines
Old Rules
Be highly engaged, participatory, and responsive during weekly class meetings. At least once per class, offer a thoughtful comment or question pertaining to readings, lectures, assignments, or “THINK” prompts.
Be active learners and teachers. Bring in your own content, examples, ideas, opinions, and experiences. Things change fast, and you are the experts on the web and new media. Make connections between this course and your life.
Be respectful, appreciative, and inquiring of our guest speakers. Recognize that their visit to our class is both a pro bono service they provide to you and a special opportunity for you to learn from industry experts.
Make the coursework fun and worthwhile. If your responses to group projects, papers, and cases don’t interest you, it’s unlikely that they will interest others.
Be bold. Think like an arts marketer. Engage us.
The Dynamics of Building and Retaining Performing Arts Audiences
Arts Marketing Insights
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Radiohead: Music at Your Own Price
The Tate's Digital Transformation
Wynton Marsalis & Jazz at Lincoln Center
Note on Marketing Strategy
HBS Cases
Maggie Guggenheimer

mog3b@virginia.edu
maggie.guggenheimer@gmail.com

434-882-5040

Fayerweather 215 or
VFH offices by appt.
Ol
What is Arts Marketing?
New Rules
vs.
PRICE
VALUE in money and time spent on product in the exchange

Determined by:
budget
what the market will bear
pricing strategy
ex: hard cover vs. soft cover book prices
PLACE
Venue and means of distribution

When, where, and how tickets are purchased
Where program or service occurs
PROMOTION
Communication to target markets:
Advertising
Press releases / press coverage
Guerrilla marketing
E-marketing
Video & Audio
Posters and print materials
In-person promotion
Ticket contests
PROCESS
&
PEOPLE
Smooth interaction of marketing mix
PRODUCT
Programs, services, or products offered to the public
The Marketing Mix
AKA "the 4 Ps"

Product, Price, Place, Promotion
Other Ps? - Process, People
Market Research
Marketing Strategy
The Marketing Plan
Branding
Visual Marketing
Websites
Social Media
Press Releases
Logos
Search Engine Marketing
Public Relations
Marketing Practice
Participatory Experiences
Access & Inclusion
Audience Development
Engagement Strategies
Community Building
The Arts Marketer
Key animator of the "arts administration crossroads"
Facilitates the EXCHANGE by helping create & communicate value
Responds to the needs of both artist and audience
The Artist
&
Artistic Creation
Seeks an audience, a venue, financial compensation, exposure, dialogue, connection, community change...
The Audience
&
The Community
Seeks experiences, education, connection, enlightenment, captivation, economic growth, entertainment...
THE MARKETING EXCHANGE
THE FOUR P's
TOOLS OF
COMMUNITY BUILDING

TOOLS OF
BUSINESS

SWOT Analysis
Analyze an organization's internal & external environment:
What are the first 5 words that come to mind when you hear "marketing"?
Internal: Strengths & Weaknesses
STRENGTHS
THREATS
WEAKNESSES
OPPORTUNITIES
Segmentation
* See Scott's "Buyer Personas" in Packet, pg. 117
Targeting
Target market selection should consider:

Org's strengths and weaknesses compared to competitors with regards to the segment
Org's goals and the fit of the segment with these goals
Resources necessary to successfully market to the segment
Need for / availability of collaborators to market successfully
Likely level of engagement, participation, and purchasing to be expected from the segment
Positioning
Attribute positioning
Based on a feature / attribute of the org
or program: “the oldest” or “largest” or “most exclusive;” "the next big thing"

Benefit positioning
Based on the benefits it offers
: “hands-on for children,” “for active, life-long learners,” a quiet space for meditation
Quality vs. Service vs. Economy buyers

User positioning
Based on who will use it:
“a children’s museum,” “LGBT night,” – but also by occasions: “after-work concerts,” "Nutcracker" at Christmas, rush-hour shows

Marketing Mix
√The marketing mix works out the tactical details of the positioning strategy.
Image Building
Education
Building Participation
broaden
deepen
diversify
Assessment
Planning
Arts marketing is more than selling and includes a full range of communications:
1: Points of Entry
2: Stepping Stones
Market segments are subgroups of your market that:
share similar characteristics
express similar needs/desires
respond to similar marketing strategies
TARGET MARKETS
Marketing Process Schematic
posted on Collab
Organization -> Media -> Audience

2 options:
buy expensive ads or
get media coverage
Traditional media: newspapers, magazines, radio, TV, direct mail
Hard to individualize message, which is needed for niche markets like the arts
Must "interrupt" audiences to get attention
Press releases seen only by media


But the web has changed the rules...
NEW RULES
Organization -> Audience

Communicate directly with audience
Individualized messages
Delivered at point of consumption
Direct-to-consumer news releases
Good marketers use the web to:
Tell compelling stories
Educate
Engage in conversation
Entertain
Long tail of marketing (Amazon, Netflix)
Enables buyers to search + browse
Must create useful CONTENT
Content drives action
Website content based on target markets
Branding org as thought leader
Search engine marketing
Target not only traditional media, but also: bloggers, online news sites, micro-publications, public speakers, consultants, social media, Google, RSS
Use audio and video, blogs, keywords
External: Opportunities & Threats
Ways to segment:
DEMOGRAPHIC (age, income, gender, occupation)
GEOGRAPHIC (nation, region, urban vs. rural)
LIFESTYLE or PSYCHOGRAPHIC (hedonistic vs value-oriented)
BEHAVIOR or RELATIONSHIP (occasion, user status, usage rate, benefits sought, loyalty)
Product Driven
(Artistic drivers)
vs.
Consumer Driven
(Audience drivers)
Segments should be:
Mutually exclusive - separable from each other
Exhaustive - every potential target belongs to some segment
Measurable - “love your data”
Substantial – large enough to matter and to spend resources on
Accessible & actionable – can you actually reach the segment?
Psychographic Segmentation
Grouped based on lifestyle, social class, or personality
Changes over time (same person different at age 25 than at 50); therefore dynamic compared to other segmentation
Examples: Passive Homebodies, Culture Patrons, Sports Enthusiasts, Socially Active, Childless Bohemians, etc.
Example: Philly's Cultural Sector Market Segments
"Young Traditionalists"
Not early adopters / often in 30s & 40s / married
"Solid Supporters"
Subscribers / secure / 50s & 60s / $50K+ income
"Young Trendies"
Not subscribers / risk / 20s & 30s / single / new
"Homebodies"
Quiet, secure / not new / 60s+ / plays, not art
"Confident Benefactors"
At ease / Profs. / 50s & 60s / high incomes / varied art

Positioning statement
How the organization wants to be perceived
by the target market.

What do you want your buyers to believe?

[Our organization] is
[single most important claim]
among all [competitors]
because
[single most important support].
Advertising
Sales Promo
Public Relations (PR)
Direct Marketing
Word of Mouth
How you communicate your positioning statement to the public
Unique Selling Proposition (USP)
Consider:
Content (See Scott readings)
Budget (See packet reading)
Goals (Marketing plan)
INFORMING EDUCATING PERSUADING
Customer becomes marketer
Most powerful marketing
Tipping Point (find opinion leaders)
How?

Direct
Honest
Engaging
Participatory
AUDIENCE AS:
customer
spectator
marketer
curator
Disintermediation
Long tail of content
Audience as curator (not spectator)
Encouraged by digital technology
Increases audience access
See 20UNDER40 reading,
Apply concept to Radiohead case...
Education
From "What's My Plan? A Guide to Developing Arts Marketing Plans" by Dr. Sharron Dickman, 2000
See: "Mozart in the Jungle"
Broaden
Deepen
Diversify
Landmark RAND Corporation study (2001):
A New Framework for Building Participation in the Arts
3 ways to build arts audiences
Increase audience size
Target population: inclined
Relevant factors: practical
Strategy: overcome practical barriers
Increase level of involvement
Target population: current participants
Relevant factors: experience
Strategy: make the arts experience as rewarding as possible
Bring new groups into the fold
Target population: disinclined
Relevant factors: perceptual
Strategy: overcome perceptual barriers; change attitudes toward the arts
BROADEN
DEEPEN
DIVERSIFY
3 minutes or less!
Collab Readings
RAND Study
Survey of Public Participation in the Arts
NPR Audience Segments
Wallace Studies in Arts Participation
Guides for press releases, media pitching, social media, etc.
Full transcript