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Organism relationships: The Great Lakes Region

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Unicorns Poop

on 23 November 2014

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Transcript of Organism relationships: The Great Lakes Region

Introduction
Have you ever seen the variety of different organisms in the Great Lakes Region? If you have, you must have been amazed on how each organism was- especially if they interacted with another. If you haven't experienced seeing the organisms interacting, I bet that your curiosity is killing you right now and that you really want to know. If that's the case, watch this presentation to see all the different relationships organisms have in the Great Lakes Region!
Predator/prey
What is a Predator and Prey? A predator is an organism that eats other organisms and and a prey is an organism getting eaten by another organism. Two organisms that follow this relationship in the Great Lakes Region is the Walleye Fish and the Crayfish. The Walleye Fish is the predator and the prey is Crayfish where the Walleye Fish eats the Crayfish to get energy. This is an example of a Predator/Prey relationship.
Scavengers
What is a Scavenger? A scavenger is an organism that eats the remains of another organism when it dies. A scavenger in the Great Lakes Region is a Chinese Mitten Crab. When a fish like the White Sucker dies and falls to the ground, the Crab scavenges the remains of the fish to gain energy.This is an example of a scavenger relationship.
Producer/Consumer
Parasite/host
What is a Parasite and Host? A Parasite is an organism that lives in or on another organism so it can suck nutrients from it. A host is an organism that supports the parasite at its own expense. This relationship is followed by the Sea Lamprey and Lake Trout in the Great Lakes Region. The Sea
Lamprey has a suction-like mouth where it attaches itself to the Lake Trout to get nutrients. This is an example of a Parasite/Host relationship.
Organism relationships:The Great Lakes Region
By: Rhea Gainadi

What is a Producer and a Consumer?A producer is a type of organism that makes its own food and a consumer is an organism that eats a producer. This relationship is followed by Phytoplankton Algae and Ducks in the Great Lakes Region.
The duck is the consumer and the algae is the producer where the duck eats the algae so it can get energy. This is an example of a Producer/Consumer relationship.
Decomposers
Competitive Relationship
mUTUAL rELATIONSHIP
cONCLUSION/bIBLIOGRAPHY
Now that your curiosity has ended and you have learned the basic information about the many different relationships organisms have in the Great Lakes Region, use the sites below to learn even more about each relationship. Thank You!
"FOSSweb Student Module Detail." FOSSweb Student Module Detail. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2014.
What is a Decomposer? A decomposer is an organism that breaks down dead or decaying matter. A decomposer in the Great Lakes is Halobacteria. When a organism like a brine shrimp dies, the Halobacteria breaks down the remains of it so it doesn't rot. This is an example of a Decomposer relationship.
What is a Competitive Relationship?A competitive relationship is relationship where two organisms fight over something they both need like food.Two organisms that do this are the Walleye Fish and the Lake Trout. Since these two organisms eat the same thing-the Rainbow Smelt, they compete with each other to get the food. This is an example of a competitive relationship.
What is a Mutual Relationship? A mutual relationship is when two organisms help each other survive. Two organisms in the Great Lakes Region that do this are Hydra and Algae. They benefit each other when the algae gets nutrients from the hydra and the products of photosynthesis from the algae help the hydra grow better. This is an example of a Mutual Relationship.
"Invasive Species." EPA. Environmental Protection Agency, n.d. Web. 23 Nov. 2014.
State of the Great Lakes 2005. Ottawa: Environment Canada, 2005. Web.
"About Our Great Lakes: Ecology." About Our Great Lakes -Ecology- NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL). N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Nov. 2014.
"Feast and Famine in the Great Lakes - National Wildlife Federation." Feast and Famine in the Great Lakes - National Wildlife Federation. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Nov. 2014
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