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Eastern Woodland Indians

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by

Janine Smith

on 8 November 2015

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Transcript of Eastern Woodland Indians

Women farmed, built shelters, took care of the children, and made clothes.
Men hunted, fished, made weapons/tools, and protected the village.
The area had a lot of natural resources such as wood, fertile soil, rocks, water, animals, & plants
Natives used animal hides for clothing & moccasins
The Natives build canoes out of tree limps, bark, and tree sap.
The Natives used tree bark & wood to build longhouses
The Natives hunted, farmed, gathered, and fished for food.
Tribes
Native Americans of the Eastern Woodlands
Iroquois
Cherokee
Creek
Erie
Shawnee
Geography
The Eastern Woodlands Region is the land east of the Mississippi River and its river valley.
The area is rich in fertile soil, forests, rivers, lakes, and fields
Some of the states include NY, VA, NC, SC, GA, FL, MS, AL, IL, & KY.
Natural Resources
Government
A group of representatives made the decisions for the tribe - Great Council
Natives
Today

Today some natives still live on reservations. The Iroquois live in New York where they still use the Great Council
Members
Beliefs &
Customs

Natives felt a deep connection to nature - thanked nature for all her gifts
Wampum - belts made of polished seashells that were highly valued
Wampum belts were used to record events and memories. The use of patterns and symbols were a method of storytelling.




Often the color of wampum held meaning, for example, white beads indicated peace, and purple or violet meant war or death.
The white beads were made from whelk shells and the purple were made from quahog shells.
Wampum was a typical item used or carried by American Indians. Wampum consisted of beads of two principal colors, white and purple, that had a cylindrical shape. These beads were usually strung or woven into patterns on a belt.
Wampum Beads
Full transcript