Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Narrative

No description
by

Kaylee White

on 1 July 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Narrative

Introducing Narrative Structure Orientation Complication (Beginning) (Problem) Series of Events Resolution (End) Who? What? Where? When? Why? This is where the author sets the scene.
Characters are introduced
Place and time period are esstablished
Clues are given to set up for the coming complication A problem -
Something happens in order to trigger the rest of the story.
This trigger may affect setting, characters or time. A set of events triggered by the complication.
The body of the narrative.
Lead toward the resultion. Coda The problem is solved and the story ends. There may be a moral or message at the end of the story.
Note: Not all narratives have a coda. Consider the structure of the story
of Little Red Riding Hood 1. Orientation: Little Red Riding sets out for her grandma's house.

2. Complication: Little Red meets the wolf.

3. Series of Events:
The wolf leaves Little Red and races to her Grandma's house.
The wolf eats Grandma and puts on her clothes.
Little Red arrives and the wolf tricks her.

4. Conclusion: The Woodcutter arrives and saves the day.

5. Coda: Children should not talk to strangers.

Activity Each student is given a random everyday object.
Examples include:
A pen
A pencil
A photograph
A flower
A bottle of hand sanitizer
A clock
An elastic band Students then use these objects to write a creative narrative, using the narrative structure (Orientation, Complication,Series of events, Resolution & Coda). For a challenge, put students in groups of two or three, and ask them to write a collaborative narrative.
The must choose characters and events to link their objects. (Steven Frigg, n.d. http://wwwfp.education.tas.gov.au/english/narrative.htm) Students will need to pay particular attention to planning and drafting. Each group should then present the story to the class.
Perhaps through a PowerPoint Story Book.
Full transcript