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#Murica

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James Hallberg

on 26 September 2013

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Transcript of #Murica

#Murica
Public School
Slave Trade
First Great Awakening
Nationalism
Conclusion
Land Ownership
Bibliography
Public Schooling
Slave Trade
First Great Awakening
Land Ownership
Nationalism
Suffrage
Emphasis on Education
Institution of Slavery
The Constitution and Slavery
Impact of Slavery
A Summary of the Term
Effects on Culture
Nationalism: (n) The ideological premise that one's devotion and loyalty to one's nation or nation-state surpasses other individual and group interests.
Although the basic idea has been around since before the dawn of man, with all varieties of species demonstrating territorial traits, it was not until the late 18th century that the term became nationally recognized as a driving force in politics and national development



In one's search for the impacts of nationalist impact upon history, one need look no further than the French and American revolutions, the first two powerful manifestations of nationalism in recorded history.
American nationalism originated from the (at the time) modern political views of men such as Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson
-Spiritual revival in American colonies in the eighteenth century

-Cause: Religion became boring among the people because it was all the same so a few decades later the First Great Awakening occurred.
Separation of Church and State
The separation of Church and State in regards to an American culture has always been in regards to Christianity, and the moral and constitutional controversy has been raging over the years.
Historically, the Church had always been closely intertwined with the affairs of the State. However, the decision of the American nation was to separate church and state, primarily for the same reasons they came: to be able to protect their religious freedom.
Development of Egalitarianism
Effects:
1. Primarily prepared America for independence because it taught people that they could stand up for what they believed in and they didn't have to do whatever the church said, therefore everyone realized that the church shouldn't have all the power, creating the idea of self-governance.
2. Even though the colonists broke off into different religions, they shared a common belief of freedom from Britain, starting ideas of revolution.
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Encyclopedia Britannica
http://www.democracyweb.org/consent/principles.php
Encyclopedia Britannica
Slavevoyages.org
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart1.html
"Great-Awakening.com." Great-Awakening.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Sept. 2013.
The term "egalitarianism" refers to the political and social philosophy regarding equality for all members of society
This philosophy is the basis of the creation of American government.
Ironically, this is the same basic philosophy behind Communism, long regarded the polar opposite of Democracy
The irony involved in a constitution designed to provide freedom to all in a nation built largely on slave labor seemed lost on a majority of colonial US
It was not until the emancipation proclamation on January 1st, 1863, well after the establishment of America, that slavery was officially abolished
As an initially highly agricultural nation, slavery was absolutely essential to the building of our nation, as morally repulsive we find this today
Slavery led to thousands of deaths in the Atlantic, the transatlantic slave trade being famed for it's brutality and mortality rate
The practice and nature of slavery has lead to long standing social and economic divides, despite our nations many attempts at racial equality.
The slavery of a particular ethnic group is a practice as old as man, with all great civilizations, much as we like to forget it, built on slave labor.
In America, plantations became the heart of the economy, and free labor was the most economical way to farm. As was the case, the slave trade was immensely popular in the land of freedom
Religious Pluralism
Earning capacity
Averagely illegal to not attend school under 18
In some states it is illegal to not have a diploma or GED
25% of state taxes is towards education
Federal Funding- $856 million
State funding- $7.74 billion
More people all getting higher education and the competition is greater to have more education.
http://www.directlinesoftware.com/landacq.htm
http://www.users.uswest.net/~willmurray/HomePages/landownershipintheunitedstates.htm
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/616563/United-States/77691/The-growth-of-provincial-power?anchor=ref612368
Effect on American Development
Along with the drive for religious freedom, the quest for the right to own land was one of the most influential forces into the colonization of the New World
See "Frontier Thesis"
Timeline
1647- Mass. colony makes all towns with at least 50 families have an elementary school
1779- Thomas Jefferson proposes free education
1820- First public high school/ public school system
1820-1860 Cities grow, number of farmers decreases. Want educated workers for industry.
1883-1983 Civil war ends and public education is brought to the south. The schools are now controlled by rich and big businessmen instead of being controlled locally
1918- All children all required to go to Elementary school

http://www.arc.org/content/view/100/217/

http://www.cbpp.org/cms/?fa=view&id=2783

http://www.arc.org/content/view/100/217/

http://people.howstuffworks.com/public-schools1.htm
Public Education
Power of public education is to the states
Federal government provides money and rules against discrimination and testing
50 million kids in public 7 million in private
After the Amer. Rev. Thomas Jefferson said the US needed an education system, suggested taxes be used for funding.
His idea was ignored until 1850s
Horace Mann of Massachusetts and Henry Barnard of Connecticut
Suffrage- the right to vote in an election
15th amendment gave voting rights to African American males passed in 1870
1920 the 19th Amendment gave women the vote

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/suffrage

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/15th-amendment-adopted

https://www.aclu.org/timeline-history-voting-rights-act

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/suffrage/history.htm

http://www.history.com/topics/the-fight-for-womens-suffrage
Suffrage
How It Started
1848 Seneca Falls Convention first organized demand for the vote
The 15th amendment made some women angry because it granted African Americans voting but not women
Some women believed the 15th would lead to their own right to vote
Women with these beliefs created two separate organizations
In 1890 the two groups united and became National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA).
How They Won
The belief by the white middle class that women's vote would "ensure immediate and durable white supremacy, honestly attained."
"Maternal Commonwealth" - women are different from men and their vote would make the US more moral and pure
Violent protesters- Suffragettes ( went too far but got publicity)
Set fires
Broke windows
Bombs
Non-Voilent protesters- Suffragists ( didn't get much done but didn't harm others)
Hunger strikes while imprisoned
Meetings/ debates
Flyers
I CAN'T HEAR YOU OVER MY FREEDOM YOU KNOW WHY? CUZ ITS MERICA
WE RIDE BALD EA
GLES INTO TH
E
SUNSET
RED WHITE AND
FRE
EDOM
CAN I GET A BIG
MAC
WITH A SIDE OF FREEDOM
" ARE YOU FREE TOMORROW" "OF COURSE I AM ITS MERICA"
* PHONE RINGS* " YOU GONNA GET THAT?" " NO, LET FREEDOM RING."
Cause
Consent of the Governed
Consent of the Governed is a concept the founding fathers determined to be an "unalienable right", a terminology famous throughout America
The term is used to describe a political system within which the people have the power, as opposed to a single entity of authority
Land Ownership and the American Identity
The ability to own land was, and is, a crucial part of what defines an American identity. Land ownership and the abundance of "free" land was one of the primary causes of the loosening constraints of authority, which lead to the unique position America was put into, permitting it to begin to form a democratic government.
Frontier Thesis
Fredrick Jackson Turner in 1893 composed a theory stating that American Democracy was a direct result of the abundance of free land.
The theory, known today as the "Frontier Thesis", has been challenged and modified many times over a number of years, however, the primary concept was largely preserved.
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