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Journal week 3

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by

Nicky Silverwood

on 23 June 2013

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Transcript of Journal week 3

Interpretation of Lobster Telephone by Salvador Dali
This piece’s style is 20th century surrealism; A combination of items that don’t normally go together
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The materials used are the steel of the phone and the lobster looks like it could be plastic or ceramic but it tells me that it is plaster which I guess is similar. The subject is pretty obvious the telephone and the lobster. The method I would guess would just be the lobster is glued to the phone.
I looked at several websites and several pieces and this one just kept catching my eye. It’s so odd, like you’d never expect a telephone and a lobster to go together. The lobster is clearly fake I think maybe I could be a little more realistic since obviously the phone is real with the cord and all it seems to clash a little. The coloring on the lobster is kind of dull and could be more saturated. The shape and size seems to be right though. The phone is very nice. Looks nearly brand new. I’ve always likes these type of phones.
Tyanne Silverwood
Dali, S (1936) Lobster Telephone (Steel, plaster, rubber, resin, and paper. 178 x 330 x 178 mm) Retrieved from http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/dali-lobster-telephone-t03257
Dali seen telephones and lobsters as sexual objects and frequently used them in other pieces he did. He had close relations to seafood and related them to sex. He covered the nude woman’s “areas” with seafood in some of his work
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