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MoPTA Tasks Overview

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Mandy Benedict-Chambers

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Transcript of MoPTA Tasks Overview

Preparing you to successfully complete the MoPTA
Presenters
Special thanks to...
Missouri State University Faculty:
Diane Buatte
Candace Fairbairn


Missouri State University
Fall 2015 Student Teachers in the
Early Childhood Education &
Elementary Education Programs

Emalee Higdon, Ashley Golay, Shelby Builta
Lorin Dinwiddie, Melissa McConnell, Megan Starzyk
Agenda
What is the rationale behind the MoPTA?

Overview of the 4 MOPTA Tasks

How to successfully complete Task 4

How to develop a strategic plan to complete all four tasks

Tips for writing about your teaching

Dr. Mandy Benedict-Chambers (ELE)
Dr. Hae Min Yu (ECE)
What is the rationale behind the MoPTA?
The Missouri Pre-Service Teacher Assessment (MoPTA) is required for certification by the state of Missouri for
candidates seeking teaching certification
.

Taken during your student teaching experience, MoPTA assesses your
instructional capability
prior to receiving a license.
The MoPTA is designed to:

develop more
effective teachers
in the classroom
identify your
strengths
and
areas for improvement
of practice
contribute to your development plan for
professional growth

The MoPTA measures how well a teacher candidate has met the appropriate
Missouri Standards for the Preparation of Educators (MoSPE),
listed in the candidate column, as established by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE).

What are the Missouri Teacher Standards?
The teacher standards are articulated across
nine general areas of professional practice
:

Standard #1 – Content Knowledge, Including Varied Perspectives, Aligned with Appropriate Instruction
Standard #2 – Student Learning, Growth, and Development
Standard #3 – Curriculum Implementation
Standard #4 - Critical Thinking for Students
Standard #5 – Positive Classroom Environment
Standard #6 – Effective Communication
Standard #7 – Student Assessment and Data Analysis
Standard #8 – Professionalism
Standard #9 – Professional Collaboration with students, colleagues, families, and community members

Remember, the work you do during the MoPTA represents what good teachers do
every day! =)

Collecting

data
to figure out what students know & other important contextual factors about your class and community
Planning strategies & learning activities
for a specific lesson and purpose
Analyzing student work
to understand what students learned from your instruction
Reflecting
on your instruction and student learning
The tasks serve two purposes:

(1) they provide a way for pre-service teachers to
demonstrate their readiness
for classroom teaching

(2) they help pre-service teachers engage in the
authentic work
of teaching (planning, analyzing & reflecting) during the student-teaching experience.
Overview of the 4 MoPTA Tasks
Task 1
Task 2
Task 3
Task 4-NV
Effective teachers put substantial effort into launching a new school year--this includes communicating a teacher’s expectations for classroom behavior and establishing a productive environment in which all students can learn.

MoPTA Task 1 mirrors this important work by encouraging teacher candidates, who lack experience with a school-year kick-off, to
get to know the students
in their assigned classroom and help create
a positive climate for learning
.

Task 1 ensures that teacher candidates understand that knowing their students and establishing an effective classroom environment
impacts student learning
.

Knowledge of Students and the Learning Environment
Assessment and Data Collection
to Measure and Inform Student Learning
(Reading/Writing)
Task 2 asks candidates to reflect on:
(a) what their analysis of assessment evidence
reveals about their students’ learning
(b) their own success with using assessment
and data analysis to measure students'
learning
(c) what they learned about assessment and
data analysis that they can apply to their
future assessment analysis efforts
Designing Instruction for Student Learning (Math)
Task 3 asks candidates to reflect on:
(a) what their analysis of evidence from
differentiated instruction reveals about
their students’ learning
(b) their own success with using differentiation
to help students achieve a learning goal
(c) what they learned about differentiation
that they can apply to the differentiation of
future learning activities.
Planning, Implementing, Analyzing and Adjusting Instruction to Promote Student Learning
Task 4 asks candidates to reflect on:
(a) the extent to which their students reached the
learning goal(s) for the sequence of lessons;
(b) revisions they would make if they were to teach
the sequence of lessons in the future;
(c) the steps they took to have each Focus Student
understand his or her progress toward the learning
goal(s) and how they might revise those steps.
Examples
Theme/Concept/Unit topic:

Student Teacher (kindergarten): Letter Identification

Student Teacher (1st grade): Pumpkins

Student Teacher (1st grade): Science: Push and Pull Forces

Student Teacher (3rd grade): Science: Water Cycle and Solids, Liquids, and Gases


Developing a strategic plan to complete all four tasks
a. One idea is to
plan several lessons
in a unit that share a theme/concept to use to address Tasks 2, 3, and 4


b.
Create a MoPTA binder
, where you create 5 sections:
Handbook, glossary, examples and other materials, and
A section for each task: Task 1, Task 2, Task 3 and Task 4. Print the prompts and rubrics for each task from the MoPTA website, so they are easy to access
The
schedule
for the four MoPTA Tasks
Note: *Fall 2016* not yet posted
Deadlines take effect at
11:59 p.m. ET
(10:59 p.m. CT) on the date indicated.
http://mega.ets.org/test-takers/mopta/register/dates-deadlines
Task 1 is due at the
beginning of the semester
Task 2 and 3 are due on the
same day
Tips for Writing about Your Teaching
Look at the good and bad
MoPTA examples


[Library of examples: http://mega.ets.org/test-takers/mopta/build-submit-tasks/library-examples/]
Review the MoPTA
glossary
of terms


[http://mega.ets.org/s/pdf/mopta-glossary.pdf]

The glossary provides a clear definition of the terms and expectations
Make sure to use Instructional Strategies
and Learning Activities correctly
Instructional Strategies
refer to the methods, techniques, structures, and systems that a teacher uses to support student learning. Emphasize
what you will do as a teacher
.

Learning Activities
refer to the teacher-guided instructional tasks or assignments for students. These are activities the students do. When describing the learning activity, make sure to emphasize
what the students will do
… (rather than what the teacher will do).

Three kinds of writing:
Descriptive, Analytic, and Reflective
Remember to select
evidence
that represents your teaching practice and to explain your
rationale
about what you will do to support students' learning and why you did it
Description
A
retelling
of what happened in a classroom situation or event. This kind of writing is meant to set the scene for raters. Your description should be logically ordered and provide enough detail to allow raters to have a basic sense of your classroom situation so that they can understand what you are conveying in your analysis.
Analysis
Analysis deals with reasons, motives, and
interpretation
and is supported in the concrete
evidence
provided by the materials you submit. Analytic writing shows the thought processes that you used
to arrive at the conclusions
you made about a teaching situation or event. An analysis demonstrates the significance of the evidence you submit. In some cases, it will include the achievement results that came as a result of the lesson you taught. Or it could be a discussion of the results from a survey that solicited feedback from various sources.
Reflection
A thought process that occurs
after
a teaching situation. This is the kind of thinking that allows you to think deeply about what occurred—and what did not occur—during the teaching event and
to make decisions about how you would approach similar situations
in the future. You could decide to do something the same way, in a different way, or not at all. Although reflective thought may occur in many places, the reflection questions are where you must show
how you will use
what you learned from your teaching experiences to inform and improve.
If you are asked to
analyze
the success of a particular lesson or some specific instructional strategy, do not explain what happened in the analysis or reflection sections. This is
description.

Simply stating a conclusion (e.g., “The lesson was a success!”) or saying that you observed the fulfillment of your learning goals
without giving evidence
or examples to support the statement is NOT analysis. Explain
WHY you interpreted
the results of a lesson the way you did. You need to explain your interpretation of the evidence (analysis) as well as your understanding of what should come next (reflection).
Possible pitfalls
Some other tips
Respond to each prompt on a Word document before copying and pasting the text into the online text boxes

Create an outline of your response to each prompt
before
you type the paragraph; use bullets to capture your initial ideas

Restate the prompt to make sure that you are explicitly answering it and state your claim. Then, provide evidence (quotes or student work) to support your answer/claim. Finally, explain your reasoning and rationale by connecting your claim to your evidence.

Sentence frames to use:
I think this because… The [student work] made me think… The [student work] indicated that... The [student work] suggests... It is important to do... because...
Some other tips (Cont'd)
Make time for the tasks, and work on the task every day so it doesn't sneak up on you. For example, several student teachers tried to answer at least seven prompts a day.

Read the guided prompts
before
you complete your artifacts.

Label EVERYTHING; label artifacts
without
spaces to save time later.  When saving the artifacts online, you are unable to use spaces.

Discuss ideas with a colleague to help refine your thinking.
Remember, you have been prepared to successfully complete the MoPTA!
The work you do during the MoPTA is simply what good teachers
do
every day!

Collecting data
to figure out what your students know & other important contextual factors
Planning strategies & learning activities
for a specific lesson and purpose
Analyzing student work
to understand what students learned from your instruction
Reflecting
on your instruction and student learning
List of Instructional Strategies
Overview
Timeline for Task 2
Select & Give Pre-Test
Create or use an existing assessment (pre-test) to collect baseline data about student understanding
1. INQUIRY INSTRUCTION
*Problem Solving *Reflective Discussion
*Case Studies *Writing to Inform
*Concept Mapping *Venn Diagrams
*5E Instructional Model: Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate

2. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
*Field Trips *Focused Imaging
*Narratives *Field Observations
*Conducting Experiments *Role-Playing
*Games *Model Building
*Simulations *Surveys

3. INDEPENDENT STUDY
*Computer Assisted Instruction *Learning Contracts
*Journaling *Homework
*Reports *Research Projects
*Learning Activity Packages *Assigned Questions
*Learning Centers


4. INTERACTIVE INSTRUCTION
*Debates *Laboratory Groups
*Discussion *Cooperative Learning
*Panels *Problem-Solving
*Brainstorming *Reciprocal Teaching
*Peer/Partner Learning *Interviewing *Conferencing

5. INSTRUCTIONAL SKILLS
*Explaining *Questioning (Asking probing questions)
*Demonstrating *Wait Time

6. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS
*Author's Chair *Writing Conferences *Webbing
*Book Talks *Web Quests *Study Groups
*Brainstorming *Read Alouds *Writers' Workshop
*Categorizing *Readers' Theater *Grouping
*Reports *Science Fairs *Think-Alouds
*Running Records *K-W-L Charts *Storytellling
*Scaffolding *Literature Circles *Story Mapping
*Interdisciplinary Approach *Mind Mapping
(http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/DE/pd/instr/index.htm)

Overview
Timeline for Task 3
Overview
Timeline for Task 4
Example
Student Teacher (1st grade classroom):
Conducted a cold read of the Dolch Sight Word lists to collect data to establish a baseline for the pre-test
Developed a scoring guide (pre-test) to determine the developmental Dolch Sight Word list for each student: Pre-primer, Primer, First, Second, or Third.

Student Teacher (1st grade classroom):
Used a writing assessment as a pretest to create baseline data. Baseline data included two bar graphs with the number of students who scored at each level on the rubric created to assess the skill, e.g., "Topic/Main Idea."

Student Teacher (3rd grade classroom):
Used an anchor chart to assess students' understanding of the differences between fiction and nonfiction before lesson; created a rubric to score students' understanding of the different characteristics
Use the baseline data analysis to plan a
lesson

Develop lesson objectives (learning goals)

Use Data to Plan Lesson
After teaching the lesson, give the
post-test
to assess student learning
Teach Lesson & Give Post-Test
Example
Student Teacher (1st grade classroom):
Planned a lesson to enable the analysis, support, and mastery of Dolch sight word miscues

Student Teacher (1st grade classroom):
Students wrote a detailed paragraph about what they want to be when they grow up.

Student Teacher (3rd grade classroom):
Taught a lesson on the differences between fiction & nonfiction texts

Note
: For task 2, you do NOT have to submit a lesson plan. The focus of this task is an ASSESSMENT.
Example
Student Teacher (1st grade classroom):
Based on the lesson, designed an assessment (post-test) that was comprised of three sections
Read-aloud: The student looks at a list of typed words and is prompted to read them aloud to the teacher
Multiple choice: The teacher prompts the student to choose the card of the word (out of 5 cards) that she reads aloud
Spelling words using manipulatives: Students spell the word with manipulatives (magnetic letters) that the teacher reads to them
Assessed each student on individual sight words using the three-part format and calculated percentages for each of the three parts, as well as overall percentages, and filled out the scoring guide

Student Teacher (1st grade classroom):
Used the Focus Students' graded final copies to create a table to show the improvement of the 2 Focus Students from the baseline data to the end of the lesson

Student Teacher (3rd grade classroom):
Created the same anchor chart to assess what students learned about the differences between fiction and nonfiction texts; used the same rubric to score students' understanding of the characteristics

Reflect & Respond
Record the post-test data in a
graphic representation
(i.e. spreadsheet, pie chart, table)
,
and

compare with your baseline data to determine student growth

Analyze the assessment data and student learning for the
Whole Class


Analyze the assessment data and student learning for the
Two Focus Students
Select an overarching theme/concept/
unit topic/big understanding
Pick a theme/concept/unit topic/big understanding for teaching 3 sequential lessons
Identify 3 assignments/assessments for the 3 lessons
Identify Two Focus Students
Analyze baseline data for the whole class, which could be based on a prior assessment
Use data to plan the sequence of lessons, describe needs for 2 Focus Students
Analyze Baseline Data
Examples
Student Teacher (Kindergarten): Letter Identification
Based on the results from the letter identification assessment at the beginning of the year, planned the read-aloud, and had the students identify letters from their names, differentiating the amount of supports and the numbers of letters that students should identify from their names.

Student Teacher (1st grade): Pumpkins
Based on the results from the previous retelling activity, planned the read-aloud, and had the students retell the story, differentiating materials such as matching the picture cards in order and writing sentences after placing picture cards in order

Student Teacher (1st grade): Push and Pull Forces
Standards-based grading; students earned a "1" since no science had yet been graded for the year

Student Teacher (3rd grade): States of Matter and Water Cycle
Students completed a pre-test on States of Matter & Water Cycle
1st lesson, Assessment, Analyze
Results for Focus Students
Teach first lesson and give students first assessment/assignment
Analyze data and determine how results will impact instruction for the 2 Focus Students
Submit assessment, rubric, 2 Focus Students' work samples
with
your feedback
Examples
Student Teacher: Letter identification (Kindergarten)
Read the book
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
, and had the students identify letters from their name, placing the letters in order going up the coconut tree.

Student Teacher: Pumpkins (1st grade)
Read the book
How Many Seeds In a Pumpkin?
and had the students do a retell activity.

Student Teacher: Push and Pull Forces (1st grade)
Students explored a variety of push vs. pull objects; students drew pictures and labeled them as push and pull.

Student Teacher: Matter & Water Cycle (3rd grade)
Completed a foldable on the states of matter

Teach 2nd lesson and give class 2nd assessment/assignment
Analyze data and determine how results will impact instruction for the 2 Focus Students
Submit assesment, rubric, 2 Focus Students' work samples
with
your feedback
3rd lesson, Assessment, Analyze
Results for Focus Students
Teach 3rd lesson and give students 3rd assessment/assignment
Analyze data and determine how results will impact instruction for the 2 Focus Students
Submit assesment, rubric, 2 Focus Students' work samples
with
your feedback
Examples
Student Teacher: Letter identification (Kindergarten)
Students walked around the room and wrote these letters. Students identified and wrote the letters that they missed on the beginning-of-the-year assessment. Focus Student One who was above grade level was asked to create a word that began with the letter tapped around the room and then wrote the word.

Student Teacher: Pumpkins (1st grade)
2nd lesson/assessment: Math
The read-aloud book involved a lot of estimation, measurement, and skip-counting points, so a lesson was taught about measurement with non-standard tools. She brought in 4 pumpkins and the students worked in groups to make observations and to collect data about the pumpkins. The students were given different tools for measuring, including unifix cubes, papers, strings.

Student Teacher: Push & Pull Forces (1st grade)
Students went outside to the playground and indicated which playground equipment created which motion (back & forth, start, stop, and falling) and identified the force

Student Teacher: Matter & Water Cycle (3rd grade)
Students created a foldable on the water cycle
Examples
Student Teacher: Letter identification (Kindergarten)
3rd lesson/assessment: Math
Students were required to not only identify what letters were in the text box but how many of those letters were. They were required to count the times they saw that letter, write the number, and then create a bar graph to show the amount. Based on the results from the beginning of year's assessment, different texts were provided.

Student Teacher: Pumpkins (1st grade)
3rd lesson/assessment: Math
Each student made an estimation of how many seeds their pumpkin had. Then, the students participated in a skip-counting activity, separating the seeds into groups of 10. Then, they compared their estimations to the actual amounts of seeds and discussed why those pumpkins might have had "more or less" seeds according to what we learned from the book. Based on their skip-counting ability, group were assigned differently and more/less supports were provided.

Student Teacher: Push and Pull Forces (1st grade)
Students wrote predictions to investigate the question, "Does the weight of an object affect how far it will travel?" Students tested and rolled ping pong balls and metal balls down a ramp.

Student Teacher: Matter & Water Cycle (3rd grade)
Students created a 3D diorama of the water cycle
After 3 lessons & Assessments
Analyze instruction for the whole class and indicate revision based on student work
Indicate revision to better support the learning of Two Focus Students

Task 4 Tips
Remember, Task 4 represents what good teachers do
every day!
Collecting data
to figure out what your students know
Planning strategies & learning activites
for a specific lesson and purpose
Analyzing student work
& using the results to direct your instruction
Reflecting
on your instruction and student learning

Discuss the MoPTA with your CT. Ask for advice and share your plans with your teacher; let them know what is involved with the lessons. Try to use the curriculum's pre-made rubrics and assessments

Schedule your sequence of lessons to allow for the 3 assessments

Your assessments can be formative or summative; for example, you could use an exit ticket, a journal entry, a quiz, a foldable, a handout, or a test

After each lesson, adjust your instruction based on how your students did and provide written feedback to your Focus Students

Take notes during/after your conversations with your Focus Students; these notes can serve as evidence of their learning progress
The materials and guidelines presented here are excerpted from the
MoPTA website,
and reorganized for our educational purposes:
http://mega.ets.org/test-takers/mopta/build-submit-tasks/requirements/
Plan Lesson
Select a
learning theory/method
to guide your lesson
Select
instructional strategies
and
learning activities
to support student learning
Identify
technology
to enhance your instruction
Differentiate Lesson for Two Focus Students
Teach & Analyze Lesson
Whole Class & Focus Students
Describe the learning strengths and challenges of each
Focus Student
Identify the
evidence
(work samples) you will collect to show the Focus Students' learning progress
Describe how you will
differentiate
your instructional strategies, learning activities and use of technology to support the Focus Students' learning
Analyze how the
strategies, learning activities, and technology
supported class's learning. Use one student work sample (not from Focus Students) to support analysis
How did you foster
teacher-to-student
and
student-to-student
interactions?
Analyze the
feedback
you provided.
Analyze how your differentiation of the lesson helped the
Two Focus Students
(use work samples)
2nd lesson, Assessment, Analyze
Results for Focus Students
Example
Student Teacher (1st grade):
Finding unknown numbers with speed and accuracy. Example (7+?=15). Strategies - audiovisual, demonstration, discussion. Learning activities - computer activity, worksheet, math addition game, journal page. Technology - SmartBoard and desktop computers

Student Teacher (5th grade):
Math mini-lesson. Strategies- questioning, direct instruction, modeling. Learning activities - think pair share, problem solving on white boards. Technology - Smart Notebook presentation that went along with the lesson - students had opportunities to interact and manipulate numbers using the Smart Board.

Example
Student Teacher (1st grade):
Centers helped me to differentiate the lesson. I divided the students based on ability level. Higher groups had more challenging problems at teacher table, harder computer activities, and more challenging problems in the partner game. The lower level students had more guidance/manipulatives at teacher table, more basic problems on the computer, and more basic skill problems in the partner game.

Student Teacher (5th grade):
My CT had separate workbooks that came with the math curriculum for re-teach, on-level practice, and enrichment worksheets. Students were placed in groups and received different math sheets depending on their level to complete during independent practice.
Example
Student Teacher (1st grade):
Used work samples from students' independent seat work, where they had to complete equations of 15 unknown numbers.


Student Teacher (5th grade):
Used work samples from students' independent practice.
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