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Life in Acadia vs Life in New France

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by

Caroline Tang

on 31 January 2014

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Transcript of Life in Acadia vs Life in New France

Life in Acadia vs. Life in New France
By: Caroline
General Area
Life in New France
Life in Acadia
Struggles
General Area
Lifestyle
Struggles
Lifestyle
Cold winters
Short growing season
Forced out of area by British in 1710
-> land was returned in 1763
One of the main foods in New France was bread.
However, they also ate a variety of vegetables and meat.
Cold Winters
Having enough food for the whole family
Possible attack by the Iroquois
One of the favorite dishes was meat pie,
though Acadians ate a variety of dairy
products, meat, fruit, and root vegetables.
Clothing was the same as in France.
People built their own houses out of squared logs, with the help of friends. Mud and straw was used to fill in cracks and keep wind and weather out.
The Acadians were mostly farmers, and
each member of the family had jobs
that varied depending on the season.
People in New France wore similar outfits
to those in France, but copied some Native
clothing to survive the cold winters.
Most people in New France were farmers
as well. Men did the hunting and
farming, while women did chores
around the house.
Houses in New France had a stone foundation, and were made of squared logs. They usually had 2-3 rooms, shared between the members of the family, which could sometimes have over 15 children.
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