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"Hands on experience" - vet work...

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Laura Edginton

on 17 May 2010

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Transcript of "Hands on experience" - vet work...

"Hands on experience"
Vet work... Lambing... What else am I
planning to do? Why? What was I aiming
to achieve... The gear... Photos... What they eat... What I had to do...
As they only have one lamb the first time
(they are only 12 months old),
the lambs can't get to big,
as if they do, they will not be born easily...
Ewe lambs
(first time mothers)
and singles: : When the ewe lamb is waiting to have her
lamb, (pregnant), she must not eat the same food that the rest of the sheep eat, (until the last few days to a week before the lamb is born), as the lamb would grow to be bigger than the twin lambs or triplet lambs. Eating food with less protein init will stop the lambs getting "ridiculously big".
From the few months before the ewe lamb is expecting her lamb,
she can only eat hay, (to stop the lamb getting too big), as it gives her all the nutrients she needs, without letting the lamb inside her get to big.

A few days to a week before she has her lamb, she can eat the same food as the rest of the sheep. Ewe's with
twins/triplets: As the ewe is going to have multiple
lambs, there will be less space for the lambs to grow. This can often lead to lambs that are very small. The ewe's will have "sheep feed"
which is high in protein and vitamins for
breakfast and dinner, with hay for lunch. The diet of the ewe's would need to include extra protein to help the lambs to grow, so that they are strong enough to survive, and avoid predators.
Whilst I was at the farm, I did many things
including: *Feeding and watering the sheep
*Helping to feed the chickens (once)
*Riding the quad-bike (often with sheep in a trailer)
*Bedding down the lambing pens
*Delivering lambs
*Catching sheep (and the odd lamb)
*Spray painting the sheep (numbering)
*Walking (or running) the sheepdog Rose
*Moving the sheep to different feilds
*Going in the tractor to take large numbers of sheep to the feild
*Bottle feeding lambs who's mothers did not produce enough milk
*And sadly one who no longer had a mother...
*[and eating chocolate and drinking lemonade in the breaks]

When I am older I want to be a vet.
I have wanted to be one for as long as I can remember.
In doing this I have had what the trade call
"hands on experience",
which meant that I was thrown in at the deep end, delivering lambs within the first half an hour of arriving at the farm.
All the work I did was completely
voulentary and I enjoyed every
minuite.
During the first 3 of six years of vet school,
(if you count college as being two years instead of four
- 2 years over-lap into uni,)
you have practically no classroom work,
all hands on, in doing lambing and the other work I
am planning to do in the up-coming months
I will have got a taste for what may
lie ahead.


*An old-ish top
*Wellies
*Thick fluffy socks
*A jumper/fleece (if it was cold)
*Jeans - skinny of course!
And my least favourite but most useful part
*waterproof trousers. Working on a farm may not be the most glamarous thing to do so I had to wear: Soon I am going to go calf-ing
(like lambing but with baby cows)
And in the next few months i will be helping
at a horse stables, which I have done
before and would love to do again.
I have also started horse riding
which, if not the main priorty of the
lessons, it will hwlp me to be
more confident with large
animals.




Thanks for watching!
Full transcript