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Batman and Robin Have an Altercation

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by

Xiao Mei

on 11 May 2015

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Transcript of Batman and Robin Have an Altercation

Summary
Sanderson and his father
Applebee's
Crash
Psychological Approach
Sanderson and his father
Psychological Approach
Have clear routine
Formalist Approach
“In his [Pop’s] young years – before meeting Dory Levin, who civilized him – he was a roughneck in the Texas oil fields, and sometimes he reverts to that man […]”

Formalist Approach
“No, pop, huh-huh. Reggie died, He…’ Sanderson trails off, waiting to see if Pop will finish. Pop doesn’t.’ He had a car accident.’”

Batman and Robin Have an Altercation
Sanderson: Stable and passive
His father: Alzheimer
Used to be close
Psychological Approach
ALZHEIMER
“There’s an old joke about Alzheimer’s: The good news is that you meet new people every day.”

Seem content about it
“Sanderson sees his father twice a week”

“On most Sundays, Sanderson takes him out to lunch”

“Although they have been having Sunday lunch at the same one for more than three years now, Pops almost always says the same thing: “This isn’t so bad. We ought to come here again.””


Psychological Approach
Father can't take care of himself
“Sanderson accompanies him to the men’s room, and his father allows him to unzip his fly [...]”

Psychological Approach
Sanderson's inner anger
“That kid is in his fifties now, probably going silver at the temples. Sanderson hopes this grown version has prostate cancer and it hurts, he hopes the guy had a kid who died of SIDS, hopes he got mumps and went both blind and sterile, but he’s probably just fine. Why not? He was sixteen. All water over the dam. Youthful indiscretion. The records would be sealed. And Reggie? Also sealed.”


Psychological Approach
Brother's death causes anger
Seems stable on the surface but
a small thing and things
blow up
“He pushes the button that lowers his window, sticks out his arm, and wags his middle finger at the truck.”

Does not want to be the good guy anymore
Psychological Approach
Progression through action
“In addition to providing a good smoke screen for feelings of vulnerability, becoming angry also creates a feeling of righteousness, power and moral superiority that is not present when someone is merely in pain.”


Routine - Rage - Power
Formalist Approach
“We even went out of that way for Halloween one year, do you remember? I talked you into it. The Caped Crusader and the Boy Wonder.”


Formalist Approach
“Lately, all sorts of things turned up in Pop’s room: cases; silverware (actually sturdy plastic-ware) from the dining hall,[…]”


Formalist Approach
“Pop sails on with his hands tucked deep in his pockets.”



by Stephen King
Biographical Approach
Stephen King
Mythological Approach
Sanderson



Took care of his father until he entered a Special Care Unit;
Visits his father twice a week
takes him out when he can.

Archetype
Puts other first;
Loyal;
Warm and welcoming
‘‘Sanderson sees his father twice a week. On Wednesday evening, […] he drives three miles to Crackerjack Manor and sees Pop […]. On most Sundays, Sanderson takes him out to lunch.’’


Mythological Approach
The Father
Sick and dependant;
Living his final time in a hospital/Retirement home;
Can’t take care of himself;
Protected his son.


Archetype
Still wants to take care of his children;
Dependant, sick/weak;
One of his or her relatives takes care of him or her.
‘‘Sanderson longer has to change the old man’s bed when he pisses in it or get up in the middle of the night when Pop goes wandering around the house, calling for his wife, […] who has been dead for fifteen years.’’



The Old Person
The Caregiver/ The Helper
Mythological Approach
In the story
Halloween of 1959: the father and the son dressed up as Batman and Sanderson as Robin;
Sanderson’s best Halloween.


Batman and Robin
Mythological Approach
In the story
‘‘the Batman costume was pretty lame. Gray pajamas, the bat emblem drawn on the front with Magic Marker. The cape was cut out of and old bedsheet. The Batman utility belt was an old leather tool belt in which his father had stuck an assortment of screwdrivers and chisels from the toolbox in the garage. The mask was a mothy old balaclava that Pop rolled up to the nose so his mouth showed.’’

Batman and Robin
Mythological Approach
Batman and Robin
In the latest comics, Robin is Bruce/Batman’s son;
They both take care of each other;
Can’t stand injustice;
Batman saves Robin.

Sanderson and his father
Obviously blood related;
Take care of each other;
Can’t stand injustice of Reggie dying and the drunk guy surviving;
The father saves Sanderson
‘‘Dougie and I used to pay Batman and Robin, […] the Caped Crusader and the Boy Wonder.’’

Good vs Evil
Successful American writer
Carrie
The Shining
Shawshank Redemption
Biographical Approach
Stephen King
Successful American writer
Carrie
The Shining
Shawshank Redemption
Biographical Approach
Stephen King
Father abandoned him
Older brother
Biographical Approach
Stephen King
Maine
Contemporary horror
Past addictions
Sanderson
Father develops Alzheimer - abandon
Deceased older brother
Deceased mother
Deceased mother
Biographical Approach
Stephen King
Car accident 1999
Serious physical injuries
Sanderson
Car accident
Physically injured
Epiphany
Changed his lifestyle
"Who are you?" Pop asks in the car. "I'm Dougie," Sanderson says. "Your son." "I remember Dougie," Pop says, "but he died" "No, Pop, huh-uh. Reggie died"
"In his young years- before meeting Dory
Levin, who civilized him- he was a roughneck in the Texas oil fields."
"Dory Sanderson has been dead for fifteen years [...]."
“The horror writer isn’t afraid of much these days, except one thing: acquiring a condition like Alzheimer’s disease and losing his faculties. “That’s the boogeyman in the closet now,” he says. “I’m afraid of losing my mind.” (CS Monitor)
Biographical Approach
Stephen King vs Alzheimer
"At first Sanderson can't understand what has
happened, but then he gets it."
Full transcript