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Research Methods Lesson 1

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by

Jason Frost

on 8 December 2015

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Transcript of Research Methods Lesson 1

Audience & Market Research

Segmenting audiences into different categories makes it easier for media producers to identify and target groups of people with the same needs and wants.

These are called Demographic groupings, so that different sections and sub-sections of the audience can be catered for.

Demographics relates to the way people can be grouped together and described based on different factors such as age, gender and social class
Defining Audiences
•Age
•Gender
•Culture and Ethnicity
Income and social class (socio-economic class)
Defining Audiences
Common Classifications include:
Age:
All the different sectors of the media industry use age as a way of ensuring content matches the target audience’s interests and expectation

Gender:
Gender (Whether a person is male or female) is also a significant category for audience segmentation as many media products are targeted at a specific gender group. This is perhaps most clearly seen within the magazine market.

Socio-Economic Status
The potential audience can also be segmented according to annual salary or type of job and social class.Establishing a persons disposable income is important, particularly for advertisers. Its no good advertising a top of the range sports car to households that have a low disposable income.
Socio-Economic Status Table
This is a method advertisers use to determine socio-economic status
Research Methods Report Guidance
Market Research
Audience Research
Knowing your target market and their preferences is vital for creating a product to match their needs.

If you have an audience, and you don’t do audience research, is equivalent to walking with your eyes shut.
A target audience profile (TAP) is a written and very detailed appraisal of your customers' characteristics, attitudes, and behaviors.

TAP information typically falls into two categories: demographics and psychographics.
Creating an audience profile
In pairs consider why this information is important to the producers of the NME.
How might this inform the content of the magazine?
Create a list of possible ways you might use this audience research.
Exercise
You have 10 mins to come up with a plan for the magazines next issue. You will the feedback your ideas to the group
Exercise

In teams of 4
Create a profile of a typical Burnley College media student.
Age?
Gender?
Which school?
Media at school?
Future aspiration?
Do you read local newspaper?
Why Burnley College?

Feedback answers from the group.
How might the media team use this information?
10 mins
STEREOTYPING?
Good instincts and intuition certainly play important roles in business. But gut feelings about your customers’ needs and preferences aren’t enough. If you want to minimize risk and improve your chances of success, you need sound and objective data. That’s where market research comes in.


Success depends on a lot of things, but when you have information about a particular market segment, a geographic area, or customer preferences, you'll be better prepared to make the decisions that can make or break your business.


If a media organisation is planning the launch of a new product then they will also require information on how existing products compare with each other, how successful they are and what their target audience thinks about these products.

Investigating and comparing existing media products within the competitive market is another key purpose of media research.
Competitor Analysis
Competitor analysis is the practice of researching similar products that are on the market and what effect they have on the intended audience as this can help media producers decide various things depending on what their product is.

For example a producer of a particular genre of television programme may look at existing programmes and see how it is advertised, what affect the advertising has on the intended audience, when it is scheduled to air, how this affects the audience, what the current contents of the programme are, what the general consensus on the programme is and by gaining this type of information a media producer would be able to learn from both the good and bad points and create their programme around these products.

This type of information is available through secondary sources such as BARB and RAJAR. Primary research aimed at the target audience could also provide responses and feedback regarding competitors.
Why is this important?
Student example
Advertising Placement
To judge whether it would be appropriate to place an advert for a media product in a certain place a media producer would look at similar products and where the advertising is placed for them.
By doing this he would be able to judge whether his potential advert is suitable for a certain slot in terms of attracting the right type of audience and gaining awareness.

Define Audience and Market Research
Discuss how the methods companies use
Types of Market Research
Market research methods fall into two basic categories: primary and secondary. Your research might involve one or both, depending on your company’s needs.



Primary research involves......
collecting original data about the preferences, buying habits, opinions, and attitudes of current or prospective customers.

This data can be gathered in focus groups, surveys, and field tests.
Secondary research is based on existing data from
reference books, magazines and newspapers, industry publications, chambers of commerce, government agencies, or trade associations.

It yields information about industry sales trends and growth rates, demographic profiles, and regional business statistics.
Market research is the process of collecting and analyzing information about the customers you want to reach, called your target market.

This information provides you with the business intelligence you need to make informed decisions.


Market research can help you create a business plan, launch a new product or service, fine tune your existing products and services, expand into new markets, develop an advertising campaign, set prices, and/or select a business location.

When it comes to advertising shows on television having information regarding your target audiences viewing habits is essential as the cost of advertising on TV is so expensive knowing how to get the most views by the target audience is essential. An example would be a trailer for a programme on Channel 4 aimed at late teenagers.
The producers would need to know what the most popular shows for this audience are on the channel itself and on other potential outlets such as the other channels within the channel 4 family.
With some focused research from BARB it would be clear to see that The Inbetweeners is by far the most popular programme on E4 and that it is targeted directly at the late teen demographic. Advertising around this programme then would create the maximum number of views by the target audience therefore any costs will have been worthwhile.


When it comes to advertising shows on television having information regarding your target audiences viewing habits is essential as the cost of advertising on TV is so expensive, so knowing how to get the most views by the target audience is essential. An example would be a trailer for a programme on Channel 4 aimed at late teenagers.

The producers would need to know what the most popular shows for this audience are on the channel itself and on other potential outlets such as the other channels within the channel 4 family.

With some focused research from BARB it would be clear to see that The Inbetweeners is by far the most popular programme on E4 and that it is targeted directly at the late teen demographic.
Advertising around this programme then would create the maximum number of views by the target audience therefore any costs will have been worthwhile.

Why research an audience?
Full transcript