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"In a London Drawingroom" by George Eliot

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by

Isabella Ritz

on 3 October 2012

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Transcript of "In a London Drawingroom" by George Eliot

by George Eliot In a London
Drawingroom AP English: Places The sky is cloudy, yellowed by the smoke.
For view there are the houses opposite
Cutting the sky with one long line of wall
Like solid fog: far as the eye can stretch
Monotony of surface & of form
Without a break to hang a guess upon.
No bird can make a shadow as it flies,
For all is shadow, as in ways o'erhung
By thickest canvass, where the golden rays
Are clothed in hemp. No figure lingering
Pauses to feed the hunger of the eye
Or rest a little on the lap of life.
All hurry on & look upon the ground,
Or glance unmarking at the passers by
The wheels are hurrying too, cabs, carriages
All closed, in multiplied identity.
The world seems one huge prison-house & court
Where men are punished at the slightest cost,
With lowest rate of colour, warmth & joy. Theme Through the process of urbanization, individuals are lead to isolation due to the busy lives that urbanites carry; the common repetitious architecture in the setting of city also makes the surroundings uninviting and dull, leaving no space for the appreciation of nature. Textual Evidence Process of urbanization leads to isolation: "All hurry on & look upon the ground,
Or glance unmarking at the passengers by" Textual Evidence Common repetitious architecture in the city makes surroundings uninviting and dull: "far as the eye can stretch/Monotony of surface & of form/Without a break to hang a guess upon." Tone & Shifts Tone: Pessimistic/Gloomy No shifts; same tone throughout poem Relevance of Structure or Form Iambic Pentameter Monotonous Flow Biographical Information Real Name: Mary Anne Evans Born on November 22, 1819, in Warwickshire, England Educated until the age of 16 (traditional Christian education); began to question Christian beliefs; became friends with progressive free-thinkers including Ralph Waldo Emerson; introduced to more liberal theologies Moved to London in 1850 and became the assistant editor of "The Westminster Review" Influences Lived in Geneva after her father's death; natural environment inspired her greatly Rural society (her own experiences); believed there was interest and importance in the mundane details of the country life Religion London Analysis The sky is cloudy, yellowed by the smoke.
For view there are the houses opposite
Cutting the sky with one long line of wall
Like solid fog: far as the eye can stretch
Monotony of surface & of form
Without a break to hang a guess upon. Visual imagery: what is seen through the window Simile: comparing the houses to "solid fog" No bird can make a shadow as it flies,
For all is shadow as in ways o'erhung
By thickest canvass, where the golden rays
Are clothed in hemp. No figure lingering
Pauses to feed the hunger of the eye
Or rest a little on the lap of life. Visual imagery Metaphor: "thickest canvass" refers to clouds Metaphor: "lap of life" metaphor for enjoyment of life's comfort (mommy's lap) Personification: hunger of the eye (curiosity is not fulfilled) The world seems one huge prison-house & court
Where men are punished at the slightest cost,
With lowest rate of colour, warmth and joy. Simile: world compared to "prison-house & court" All hurry on & look upon the ground,
Or glance unmarking at the passers by
The wheels are hurrying too, cabs, carriages
All closed, in multiplied identity. Visual imagery Personification: "wheels are hurrying" Pessimistic over society's situation during her lifetime; no forgiveness, compassion or joy Questions? Thank you for your attention! Metaphor: houses are "cutting the sky with one long line of wall" Personification: sun is dressed in hemp Metaphor: we can't physically hang our interest
as there is not a place to do so Multiplied identity: referring to cabs
and carriages (metaphor) Economic metaphors: cost & rate
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