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Invisible Knapsack of Privilege

Queer privilege presentation
by

Patricia Vázquez

on 1 October 2013

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Transcript of Invisible Knapsack of Privilege

What privileges do YOU have that you are oblivious to?
Privilege- an invisible package of unearned assets that one can count on but which one is oblivious to.
In 1988, American feminist and
anti-racist activist
Peggy McIntosh
wrote the famous
essay titled "White
Privilege: Unpacking
the Invisible
Knapsack".

It brought awareness
to the privileges that
white males are ascribed,
things that women and
people of non-Caucasian
races have to work to achieve,
and don't always receive .
The essay is written in first person from a minority point of view, expressing desire for equality. They wish to one day take part in the small things that are a given to most, and to be granted privileged as the majority is.
Having been made aware of male/caucasian privilege,
and as a heterosexual ally, it is my duty (and ironically, privilege) to share what lies in the invisible knapsack of heterosexual privilege.
I am not identified by my sexual orientation.
Nobody will try to make me believe that my sexual orientation is just a "phase"
I can look forward to finding a person with whom I share a life long love and have the option of having that bond legally recognized in marriage.
I can walk down the street holding hands with my boy/girlfriend or spouse with a reasonable absence of fear of retaliation.
I don't have to fear violence or verbal
abuse because of
my sexual orientation
I can watch a TV show or watch a
movie, and see a relationship like mine.
My sexual orientation will
never be associated with a closet.
I can go to a school dance or function with my boy/girlfriend or spouse without special permission or fear of rejection due to his/her gender identity.
People do not question my parenting
ability due to my sexual orientation.
Nobody tries to convince
me that my
sexual orientation
is a choice that
I can stop making.
The Invisible Knapsack of Heterosexual Privilege
“At some point in our lifetime, gay marriage won't be an issue, and everyone who stood against this civil right will look as outdated as George Wallace standing on the school steps keeping James Hood from entering the University of Alabama because he was black.”
- George Clooney
“It takes no compromise to give people their rights...it takes no money to respect the individual. It takes no political deal to give people freedom. It takes no survey to remove repression.” -Harvey Milk
10 privileges in no particular order that heterosexuals have, which homosexuals
often do not, written in first person from a heterosexual point-of-view
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
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8.
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10.
Works Cited

McIntosh, Peggy. "White Privilege." White Privilege. N.p., 1998. Web. 20 June 2012.
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