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Copy of The Civil Disobedience

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Sara Leonetti

on 17 September 2015

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Transcript of Copy of The Civil Disobedience

Civil Disobedience
Influenced by the writer Ralph Waldo Emerson
Introduced Thoreau to the ideas of transcendentalism
Individualism:
http://www.intrepidreport.com/archives/3651
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
Biography
Father pencil maker
Maternal grandfather, Asa Dunbar
Led Harvard´s "Butter Rebellion" (1776)
The first student protest
Studied at Harvard University
People was astonished the tranquility of how he faced death
Died at the age of 44
Interesting Facts:
Legend - He refused to pay his $5 for his Harvard diploma.
He was an abolitionist.
Thoreau is pronounced like the word "thorough"
One of the first Americans that supported Darwin´s theory of evolution
He was a vegetarian.
He influenced Gandhi and MLK, Jr.

Individuals are greater than any institution.
Basic truths are arrived at through intuition.
The inner soul leads to truth.
Nature is significant.
Nature leads to self-knowledge.
Nature is good in comparison with society.
The mind is all we need.
The Over-soul is present.
Be an individual.
Each person should live for himself and follow his own interests and goals.
Individual priorities over world concerns.
Maintain their integrity by staying true to their values and concerns.
Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862)
Sleepy Hollow Cemetery
Concord, Massachusetts.
Civil disobedience is the active, professed refusal to obey certain laws, demands, and commands of a government, or of an occupying international power. It is commonly, though not always, defined as being nonviolent resistance. It is one form of civil resistance.
Martin Luther King:
I became convinced that noncooperation with evil is as much a moral obligation as is cooperation with good. No other person has been more eloquent and passionate in getting this idea across than Henry David Thoreau. As a result of his writings and personal witness, we are the heirs of a legacy of creative protest. The teachings of Thoreau came alive in our civil rights movement; indeed, they are more alive than ever before. Whether expressed in a sit-in at lunch counters, a freedom ride into Mississippi, a peaceful protest in Albany, Georgia, a bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, these are outgrowths of Thoreau's insistence that evil must be resisted and that no moral man can patiently adjust to injustice.

*Martin Luther King*
Leader in African-American Civil Rights Movement
"I became convinced that noncooperation with evil is as much a moral obligation as is cooperation with good. No other person has been more eloquent and passionate in getting this idea across than Henry David Thoreau. The teachings of Thoreau came alive in our civil rights movement. Thoreau's insistence that evil must be resisted and that no moral man can patiently adjust to injustice."
MLK, Jr. was assassinated April 4, 1968, at 39
The most powerful weapons are truth noninjury, courage and soul force.
October 1908 while Gandhi was in South Africa
Refused to pay the tax of twenty-five pounds imposed on all Indians by the South African Govt. This led to the arrest of Gandhi.
Gandhi found Thoreau's essay on "Civil Disobedience" while he himself was undergoing a jail term.
In 1931, Gandhi told American reporter Webb Miller, “Why of course I read Thoreau . . . I read Walden first in Johannesburg in South Africa in 1906,” said Gandhi, “and his ideas influenced me greatly.”
In October 1908, Gandhi was in South Africa
He refused to pay the tax of twenty-five pounds imposed on all Indians by the South African Govt. This led to his arrest.
Gandhi found Thoreau's essay on "Civil Disobedience" while he himself was undergoing a jail term.
In 1931, Gandhi told American reporter Webb Miller, “Why of course I read Thoreau . . . I read Walden first in Johannesburg in South Africa in 1906,” said Gandhi, “and his ideas influenced me greatly.”
Gandhi was assassinated January 30, 1948, at 78.
For Thoreau, King and Gandhi, nonviolent resistance was a state of mind as well as a method of activism. They transformed their rightful outrage from reflexive anger into reflective passion for justice and love of humanity.
Logical
Appeals
That government is best which governs not at all.
Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it.
I cannot for an instant recognize that political organization as my government which is the slave's government also.
Is a democracy, such as we know it, the last improvement possible in government? Is it not possible to take a step further towards recognizing and organizing the rights of man? There will never be a really free and enlightened State until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and treats him accordingly.
I find that the respectable man, so called, has immediately drifted from his position, and despairs of his country, when his country has more reasons to despair of him.
Its very Constitution is the evil.
If you are cheated out of a single dollar by your neighbor, you do not rest satisfied with knowing you are cheated, or with saying that you are cheated, or even with petitioning him to pay you your due; but you take effectual steps at once to obtain the full amount, and see to it that you are never cheated again. Men, generally, under such a government as this, think that they ought to wait until they have persuaded the majority to alter them. They think that, if they should resist, the remedy would be worse than the evil. But it is the fault of the government itself that the remedy is worse than the evil.
The mass of men serve the state thus, not as men mainly, but as machines, with their bodies.
There is but little virtue in the action of masses of men. When the majority shall at length vote for the abolition of slavery, it will be because they are indifferent to slavery, or because there is but little slavery left to be abolished by their vote. They will then be the only slaves. Only his vote can hasten the abolition of slavery who asserts his own freedom by his vote.
Now, what are they? Men at all? or small movable forts and magazines, at the service of some unscrupulous man in power?
Ethical
Appeals
"Show me the tribute-money," said he--and one took a penny out of his pocket--if you use money which has the image of Caesar on it, and which he has made current and valuable, that is, if you are men of the State, and gladly enjoy the advantages of Caesar's government, then pay him back some of his own when he demands it. "Render therefore to Caesar that which is Caesar's and to God those things which are God's"--leaving them no wiser than before as to which was which; for they did not wish to know.
Emotional
Appeals
I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward. It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right.
A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance, nor wish it to prevail through the power of the majority.
The rich man--not to make any invidious comparison--is always sold to the institution which makes him rich.
Truth is always in harmony with herself, and is not concerned chiefly to reveal the justice that may consist with wrong-doing.
They who assert the purest right, and consequently are most dangerous to a corrupt State
What do you
THINK?

Thus the state never intentionally confronts a man's sense, intellectual or moral, but only his body, his senses.
Henry David Thoreau
I can explain Civil Disobedience and identify three types of appeals in art and reading.

Agenda:
Remember Henry David Thoreau?
What is Civil Disobedience?
Who was influenced by Thoreau?
How has Civil Disobedience impacted the world?
Quickwrite
Define three types of appeals p. 209
Create chart #2 p. 223
Read "Resistance to Civil Government" p. 211-216
Identify each type of appeal
Quickwrite:

Sometimes a government enforces a law that is intended to protect or benefit people but actually infringes on their rights, such as the right to free speech. Reflect for a few minutes on the policies or laws already existing or proposed in your school or community (curfews, dress codes, smoking regulations). Freewrite for a few minutes on what you think are the strongest arguments for and against one of these policies or laws. How does this impact your sense of justice?
Logos: Consists of facts, examples, and well-reasoned arguments.
Ethos: Arguments based on widely accepted values or moral standards
Pathos: Consist of language and anecdotes that arouse strong feelings
Turn to p. 223 and create the chart
as show in #2 on a whole sheet
of paper in your journal;
dividing the sections equally.
Read
"from

R
E
S
i
S
T
A
N
C
E

to

Civil Government" p. 212-216
As a class after reading,
fill out appeal chart for Thoreau, including at least one quote for each type--the questions give you clues!
Define JUSTICE in your own words.
Take notes "on" Gandhi as you watch the film.
Rate each statement, 1-8;
1 being the one
you believe the most.
Do not repeat numbers.
Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.
~Martin Luther King, Jr.
In matters of truth and justice, there is no difference between large and small problems, for issues concerning the treatment of people are all the same.
~Albert Einstein
I have always found that mercy bears richer fruits that strict justice.
~Abraham Lincoln
Banksy:
UK-based
Graffiti artist
Political Activist
Film-director

Satirical Street-Art
Subversive Epigrams
Dark Humor
Political/Social Comm.
Gallery Walk:

Take a walk around the room, looking at the 13 different paintings (2 min.).
Take a mini of the three paintings you can identify with each of the types of appeals
Paste the mini in your journal
Next to it, explain A. What the artist is trying to say, B. Which type of appeal and WHY, C. How does it apply to Civil Disobedience?
Repeat x 2
Read "from On Nonviolent Resistance" p. 220 and identify appeals in chart with a partner.
Copy "on" MLK, Jr. one line that stands out to you.
Read "from Birmingham City Jail" p. 221-222 and identify appeals on your own. Answer #5 p. 223-224
There is a higher court that courts of justice and that is the court of conscience. It supersedes all other courts.
~Mahatma Gandhi
At his best, man is the noblest of animals; separated from law and justice he is the worst.
~Aristotle
Justice cannot be for one side alone, but must be for both.
~Eleanor Roosevelt
Justice means minding one's own business and not meddling with other men's concerns.
~Plato
Justice is sweet and musical; but injustice is harsh and discordant.
~Henry David Thoreau
Under each, explain how you chose your #1 and #8.
Which reading do you think best applies to the quote you chose? Be specific!
Pair and Share: Tell a real-life story that impacted your sense of justice.
In your journal, write down the whole story as if you are telling it to a friend.
Review your Introduction
Grading Rubric
Justice Body Paragraph
Revised draft due Monday!
Review your definition of justice and your Quickwrite;
After your Quickwrite title
Types of Appeals

On a scrap piece of paper, answer:
Who is Emerson?
What is Transcendentalism?
use your journal/put in box!
Full transcript