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Cohesion Links

TEAL 4770 Strategy
by

Annaliese Gardner

on 2 June 2011

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Transcript of Cohesion Links

Cohesion Links: Understanding the glue that holds paragraphs together What are cohesion links? Cohesion links are the important parts of written and spoken paragraphs that connect sentences so that they form a cohesive whole.

They are often in the form of pronouns that refer back to something that was mentioned previously. Cohesion-links lessons make these links more visible and understandable to ELL's. Steps in teaching a cohesion-link lesson 1. Use a sample paragraph

Prepare a paragraph at the student's reading level that contains pronouns, conjunctions, substitutions, or ellipses.
Write the paragraph so you can uncover one sentence at a time. 2. Reading one sentence at a time

Uncover one sentence at a time and have students read aloud with you.
Make connections visible to the students. 3. Reading the rest of the paragraph
one sentence at a time

Make connections between pronouns and nouns, sequence words, conjunctions, and multiple ways of referring to the same thing. 4. Practicing in pairs

Give each pair a paragraph.
Encourage them to draw arrows and make
visible connections by circling words that describe the same things and labeling conjunctions. 5. Reviewing the connections

Have students display their paragraph.
Discuss their conclusions and discuss connections in the paragraphs that help build meaning. 6. Continue to review over time

Ask "To what word in the first sentence does the word he in this sentence refer? 7. Assessing student growth and understanding

Ask students to demonstrate their understanding of cohesion links by giving them paragraphs to mark.
They can be dated and included in students portfolios. Sure Mr. Stinton was great. He knew everyone’s birthday and made cards and
cookies for them. He high-fived you when you got an A on a test, and he offered
encouragement when you didn’t do as well as you’d wanted. Emma knew Mr. Stinton
deserved a surprise party, but she wished just one person would have remembered it
was her birthday too. Emma hung the streamers, not really paying attention to where she was placing them.
She was too disappointed to focus.
After all, it was her birthday too and no one in her class had even said happy birthday.
They were all busy planning the surprise party for Mr. Stinton, the custodian. Emma hung the streamers, not really paying attention to where she was placing them.
She was too disappointed to focus.
After all, it was her birthday too and no one in her class had even said happy birthday.
They were all busy planning the surprise party for Mr. Stinton, the custodian. Emma hung the streamers, not really paying attention to where she was placing them.
She was too disappointed to focus.
After all, it was her birthday too and no one in her class had even said happy birthday.
They were all busy planning the surprise party for Mr. Stinton, the custodian. Elementary Example
Ms. Collom's kindergarten class dictate's story about their trip to the pumpkin patch.
They dictate "We went to the pumpkin patch." She stops and asks "Who went to the pumpkin patch?" They respond "We did!"
She discusses who is we to help students identify who pronouns are referring to. Secondary Example
Ms. Barnes displays paragraph on board and reads aloud.
Asks "Is there anything wrong with the paragraph?" Students say "small, round man is repeated too many times."
Students replace "small, round man" with pronouns.
Make paragraph more interesting by inserting more words.
They discuss importance of using words to help readers envision the paragraph, and how pronouns make the paragraph sound more natural.
Readers need to know who pronouns are referring to.
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