Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Borrowing from the geeks. What can healthcare facility design learn from IT?

No description
by

Jan Golembiewski

on 16 April 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Borrowing from the geeks. What can healthcare facility design learn from IT?

Prof.
Jan A Golembiewski
BfA, BArch, MArch, PhD
jg@maaparchitects.com
Borrowing from the geeks.
What can healthcare facility design learn from IT?
Unmet
Local Health District
healthcare needs
Projected
needs
State
Government
policy

Federal Government
Policy

Ministry of Health
Ministry of Human Services
National
Mental Health
Commission
Ministry of Industry and Science
Ministry of Indigenous affairs
Architectural
Agenda
Local
Agendas

Hospital
Executive

Departmental
Heads
Nursing Unit
Managers
Unions
Community
groups
The Executive
Working Group

Professional
Project
Manager
Budget
imperatives

Industrial interests
Tender
Process
Contractural
Arrangements

Transport
Community
services

NSW Mental
Health Commission
Hospital
CEO

Existing expansion
Strategy

SIMPLICITY
Team-
Motivation
Solutions-
driven
maximising the work
NOT DONE
Customer-
oriented
Flexibility
Not documentation
driven
Naturalistic
people-centric
process design
Not fixated on initial objectives

Not contract but
The Toyota
Management System
Strategic military systems
"No plan survives contact with the enemy"
General von Moltke
"A good plan...executed now is better than a perfect plan executed next week"
General Patton
Kanban
eXtreme Programming
Six Sigma
DSDM
Test Driven Development
SCRUM
A good project manager takes the brief and digests it before appointing the team...
Gerontology
Burns
Maternity
Minor
accidents
Mental
Health IPU
Academic/
research
Offices
Admin
Parking
Plant
Storage
Pediatrics
IT
Play areas
Connections
to other
hospital
Education
Bed-
cleaning
Generic
IPU's
Staff
change
Emergency
Ambulatory
Facilities
M'ment
Circulation
Intensive
Care
I.T.
V=4, T=3
P= 1.35
V=3, T=3
P=1
V=3, T=4
P= 0.75
V=4, T=3
P= 1.35

V=4, T=4, P=1
V=3, T=3,
P=1
V=2, T=2,
P=1
V=1, T=3
P=0.35
V=4, T=2
P=2
V=3, T=1
P=3
V=1, T=1
P=1
V=3, T=4
P= 0.75
V=3, T=2
P= 1.5

V=4, T=2,
P=2
V=3, T=3
P=1
V=2, T=1
P=2
V=4
T=3, P=1.35

V=1, T=1,
P=1
V=5, T=4
V=5, T=5

V=5, T=2

V=5, T=4
V=5, T=3
V=5, T=1
The Walking Skeleton: The framework of critical elements





The 'Product Backlog'
A well-run, generic project management starts th a slow onboarding into the project, and finishes with the value - as best imagined at the outset.

The SCRUM pattern is slightly lazy in the outset as higher time-cost priorities may be essential for the "walking skeleton." Thereafter, Priorities are set by value/time - that naturally falls away at the end of the project because all the important work has been done. The overall value is higher because clients are encouraged to re-prioritise parts as the whole comes together in order to make a really high quality outcome.
'Banked' Value
Project Time-line
The Sprint
Backlog
10. min Daily
Scrum Review
'Banked'
Value
5 days/ 10 days?
Sprint
Backlog
Intensive
Care
V=5, T=4

Plant
Connections
to other
hospital
Parking
Education
IT
Emergency
Ambulatory
Facilities
M'ment
Circulation
V=5, T=1
V=5, T=3
V=5, T=3
V=5, T=4
V=5, T=5
V=3, T=1
P=3

V=4, T=2,
P=2

V=4, T=2,
P=2
Bed-
cleaning
V=2, T=1
P=2
Allign stories within the project
Track progress
Chart value complete
Identify delays
Sprint
Review
Meeting
Sprint
Planning
Meeting
simplicity
generosity adaptability
easy way-finding
multiple-usage
good connectivity
simple form & style
access to service infrastructure
over-engineered structure
leaving unoccupied space
natural light
shallow floor-plates
Spatial/architectural flexibility
Traditional
Scrum
Planned ahead -
Iterative
Geared to deliver a plan -
Geared to deliver what's best
Geared to resist innovation -
Geared to encourage innovation
Greater cost risk -
Low cost risk
Costs human capital -
Invests in human capital
Contractual -
Transparent
Value managed retrospectively -
Continual value management
Established -
Radical
Supported by standard contracts

-
No accepted contracts
Design/construction is phased -
Scrum can be used continually

We are constantly designing Lean healthcare facilities and want partners on the same page. So we're planning
a Scrum course for Healthcare Design Specialists.
If you're Interested, email me: Prof. Jan Golembiewski

jg@maaparchitects.com
The art of maximising the amount of work NOT DONE...
2
3
4
5
2
6
7
8, 12
9
10, 13, 22
11
16
17
18,20
19
19
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
14
Full transcript