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MacEwan Athletic Performance Symposium

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Kyle Dunlop

on 2 March 2015

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Transcript of MacEwan Athletic Performance Symposium

Build a Foundation before the House
MacEwan Performance Symposium 2012
1912
2008, 2009
Kyle Dunlop
BA Kine, CSEP-CEP, C.S.C.S
Fitness & Lifestyle Programmer III
Centre for Sport and Wellness
dunlopk4@macewan.ca
Mens 100m WR Progression
10.6 sec.
1921
10.4 sec.
1956
1936
1968
1960
1988
1983
1930
1991
1999
1996
1994
1991
Second Club
A
0.6 second
difference over
48 years
Usa
in B
olt
The Foundation
Mind over Matter
POWER
Prevention
STRENGTH
What makes you Tick?
Fuel Up!
Your heart is like every other muscle... it must be trained
10.2 sec.
10.3 sec.
10.0 sec.
10.1 sec.
9.92 sec.
9.95 sec.
9.93 sec.
9.86 sec.
9.90 sec.
9.85 sec.
9.84 sec.
9.79 sec.
9.58 sec.
2002
2005, 2007
9.74 sec.
9.78 sec.
A
0.21 second
difference over
39 years
A
0.16 second
difference over
2 years
Periodization
Physiological
Sociological
Psychological
Frequency
Volume
Rest Periods
Evaluation of the sport
Assessment of the athlete
Physical Testing
Core & Assistance
Sport specific
Needs Analysis
Exercise Selection
Muscular Endurance
Program Design
Determine the
unique characteristics
of the sport

Movements -
Body and limb patterns

Physiological analysis -
Strength, power, ME

Injury Analysis - Common sites for joint and muscle injury
training status
Type of program (sprints, plyometrics etc.)
Exercise technique experience
Level of intensity from previous programs
testing and evaluation
Testing involves looking at:
Strength
Agility
Body composition
Flexibility
Muscular Endurance
VO2
training goal
What are we trying to achieve? Strength, power, hypertrophy, or muscular endurance. Primarily focus on one training outcome per season.
Core Exercises
Multijoint exercises involving major muscle groups. More important for performance development
Assistance Exercises
Single-joint exercises. Least important for performance development
The primary adaptation at the beginning of a training program should emphasize muscular endurance.
Train the movement. Not the muscle
The number of training sessions in a given time period (typically over a week)
Beginner: 2-3
Intermediate: 3-4
Advanced: 4-7
Relates to the total amount of weight lifted in a training session
Volume = reps * sets * load
= 10 * 4 * 100 lbs.
= 4000 lbs.
But First... What is strength?
Hypertrophy
The Keys to Strength Development...
Strength is defined as the maximal force or torque a muscle or muscle group can exert against a resistence
There are 7 key Concepts to Strength Development:
Motor Unit recruitment
Motor Unit Synchronization
Motor Unit rate coding
Stretch Shortening Cycle
Neuromuscular Inhibition
Muscle Fiber Type
Hypertrophy
Motor Unit Recruitment
Force Production
Type 1 fiber
Type 2B
Type 2A
The Size Principle of Recruitment
Muscle Fiber Type
Strength and power athletes have high percentages (53 - 60%) of Type II muscle Fibers
Conversely, having a high percentage of Type I muscle fibers is advantageous to endurance exercise performance
A GREATER muscle cross-sectional area contributes to muscle hypertrophy seen in response to resistance training
What is Power?
Force = m x a
Power differs from Strength in that it involves an acceleration component. The rate of force development by a muscle against a resistance
RFD = change F/ change T
Power = F x D/T
Equations
SAID Principle
The Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demand
The more similar the training activity is to the actual sport movement, the greater the likelihood that there will be a positive transfer to the sport
Force-Velocity Relationship
The key to training power is keeping the load low and explosively moving the resistance over a short period of time
Building Power
Bioenergetics
The main energy system involved when developing power is the ATP-Phosphocreatine system
The ATP-PC system is the dominant energy source in bouts of exercise 10 seconds or less
The best example of the ATP-PC system in athletics is the 100 meter sprint
Work:Rest Ratio
A
W:R ratio depends on the primary energy system being used
. When developing power a work to rest interval should be
1:12 - 1:20
In Season
Focus on maintenance

Workouts should be short in duration, and high intensity

Stress Quality over Quantity
Tip
Athletic Injuries
Technique
Overtraining
Back Performance
Athlete's must be able to adapt to constantly varying training loads and stressors associated with training and competition.
Never sacrifice technique
Movements can be broken down in to
SIX
fundamental patterns:
Squat/lift, lunge, twist, push/pull, gait, maintaining balance
Minimize spine power - Maximize hip power
Injury is high when there is spine bending combined with high bending torque

The "power" in a protected athlete comes from the hips, not the back
Abdominal Bracing
Activation of all three layers of the abdominal wall binds them together for a stiffness greater than the sum of the parts
Groove motion patterns, motor patterns and corrective exercises
Perfect the
"hip hinge"
Back Pain
Shin Splints
Hamstring and Groin Injuries
Shoulder Impingements
Hydration
Cramping and Heat illness
Concussions
Flexibility
Stress, Arousal and Anxiety....
Motivation
There are 2 types of athletes:

Intrinsically motivated: Mastery of skill, self efficacy (confidence to meet challenge), Continual Improvement

Extrinsically motivated: Money, awards, praise
Motor Learning
Tips To Improve Focus:
Simulation in practice
Positive images
Pre-competition routines
Over-learn skills
Competition plans
Consider "what if?"
Obstacles to optimal focus:
Past events
Future events
Noise
Fatigue
Inadequate motivation
Visual Distractors
DON'T THINK...
Groove motions and motor patterns

Develop closed skills and move to Open skill mastery

Novice Athlete vs. Elite Athlete
Inverted U Theory
The ideal diet for an athlete depends on many factors:
age, body size, sex, genetics, and environmental training conditoins, as well as on duration, frequency and intensity of training
(55 kg)
(70 kg)
Whitney E and Rolfes SR. Fitness: Physical Activity, Nutrients, and Body Adaptations. In Understanding Nutrition. Eleventh Edition, Thomson Wadsworth Belmont, CA 2008 pg 188 .
Recommended Protein Intake for Adults
Paul GL, JACN, 2009; 28,4,464S-472S
Amino Acid Levels
Fick Equation: VO2 = Q * (a-v O2 difference)
HR x Stroke Volume
Types of Aerobic Training:
Fartlek
Long Slow Distance
HIIT
Work:Rest Ratio
A
W:R ratio depends on the primary energy system being used
. When developing an aerobic training regimen a work to rest interval should be
1:1 - 1:0
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