Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

08.01 Half-Life and Radioactive Decay

No description
by

Matthew Swetland

on 3 April 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of 08.01 Half-Life and Radioactive Decay

Data and Observations:
Half-Life
Half-Life Graph
Question #2
What is the half-life of your substance?

About 100.
Question #3
If the half-life model decayed perfectly, how many atoms would be remaining (not decayed) after 12 seconds?

120 atoms.
Question #4
If you increased the initial amount of atoms (candies) to 300, would the overall shape of the graph be altered? Explain your answer.

Yes. The reason that I say yes is because it would take longer for a half-life. The reason is because the perfect half-life would be 150 atoms instead of 100 atoms.
Question #6
The above percentage calculation will help you compare the decay modeled in this experiment to the half-life decay of a radioactive element. Did this activity perfectly model the concept of half-life? If not, was it close?
\
I would say that this experiment did give a really good representation of half-life. The reason is because as the radioactive atoms decreased, the decayed atoms would increase.
Question #1
After how many time intervals (shakes) did one-half of your atoms (candies) decay?

It was about the third time interval.
Question #5
Go back to your data table and for each three-second interval divide the number of atoms (candies) decayed by the number previously remaining and multiply by 100. Show your work.

58/142 = 0.4084 x 100 = 40.84
74/126 = 0.5873 x 100 = 58.73
122/78 = 1.564 x 100 = 156.4
152/48 = 3.166 x 100 = 316.6
177/23 = 7.695 x 100 = 769.5
184/16 = 11.5 x 100 = 1,150
190/10 = 19 x 100 = 1,900
195/5 = 39 x 100 = 3,900
199/1 = 199 x 100 = 19,900
08.01 Half-Life and Radioactive Decay
Time Radioactive atoms Atoms Decayed
(Seconds) Remaining

0 200 0
3 142 58
6 126 74
9 78 122
12 48 152
15 23 177
18 16 184
21 10 190
24 5 195
27 1 199
30 0 200
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
I did not get all of the data on this graph. But the decaying atoms keeps going higher and higher until it is to 200 (all).
Question #7
Compare how well this activity modeled the half-life of a radioactive element. Did the activity model half-life better over the first 12 seconds (four decays) or during the last 12 seconds of the experiment? If you see any difference in the effectiveness of this half-life model overtime, what do you think is the reason for it?

I would say that the first 12 seconds was the best. The reason that I would say this is because more had decayed at this point in time. I think that the reason for this is because more of the ones that are closer to each other die quicker and when they spread out, less and less die.
Matthew Swetland
April 3rd, 2014
Chemistry 1, 08.01
Full transcript