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Science Fiction Film

A genre of film that is characterized by scientific...fiction.
by

Jake Shapiro

on 11 December 2012

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Transcript of Science Fiction Film

Science Fiction in Film by Jake Shapiro Space Future Technology Alternate Reality Action One element that science fiction
film showcases is innovative design
in technology.
Many science fiction films deal
with futuristic worlds in which techn-
ology has been advanced many
fold, and this tech is shown as a pop-
ular visual aid. The Film District 9 features
a plethora of alien weapons,
vehicles, and other technology
that does not (yet) exist in our
world. The "Exo-suit"
used by Wikus in
District 9. The Mothership from District 9
hovers above Johannesburg,
South Africa. One of the alien weapons
used in District 9. These
weapons require alien DNA to
work, creating problems for
the humans. Wikus van de Merwe inside the Exo-suit. Concept art for the Mothership Example 1:
DISTRICT 9 Many science fiction films have
action-oriented plots and story-
lines. The genre itself has allowed
for many of the most innovative
and highly praised action sequences
in film history. Famous Sci-Fi action sequences:
Inception's "Hallways"
The Matrix's "Lobby scene"
Minority Report's "Highway/warehouse" scenes
Back to the Future's "Hoverboard" scene
Star Wars' "Lightsaber duels and Starship fights" Example 2:
Minority
Report The film Minority Report features an inventive blend of stylized realism and science fiction when dealing with technology. The futuristic UI used by John
Anderton in Minority Report. The 2054 Lexus concept car used in Minority Report. John Anderton is attacked by spider-like robots who seek to scan his retinas for identification. Many science fiction films dare to explore the reaches of the universe, portraying humans as they take to the stars. Example 1:
Star Wars Example 2:
Serenity/Firefly Example 3:
Star Trek Star Wars is known for its
many battles, travels, and
setting events happen in
space, with giant ships,
planets, and weapons. In the TV show Firefly (later made into the movie Serenity) a group of under-the-radar criminals live together on a space vessel, trying to survive in a hostile universe. In the classic franchise Star Trek,
Star Fleet crews on exploration and military ships, such as the Enterprise and Voyager, explore the outer reaches of space for a fictional federation. Star Wars, a "space opera," takes
the audience to a wide variety of
planets, such as... GEONOSIS KAMINO Mustafar A huge amount of science fiction
material takes place in future versions of our world that are put together by huge teams of artists and visionaries in the film industry. Example 1:
Blade Runner Blade Runner is a classic
film known for its retro-
fitted interpretation of a
future world. High above the city streets, flying cars called
"Spinners" weave in between towering sky-
scrapers and past huge flourescent advertise-
ments. Blade Runner's future Los Angeles
is peppered with huge building-scale
advertisements that Ridley Scott, the
director, thought would be relevent
to a future world. Harrison Ford leaps across the tops
of automated Taxi Cabs in persuit of
a fugitive "replicant," or android. Note the design of the city, lighting, and costumes of extras in the foreground. A "Voight-Kampff Scale" is a fictional
detection test given to alleged replicants
in Blade Runner. The test includes questions
of a sexual nature as well as moral inquiries. A spinner takes off in Blade Runner Clive Owen's character runs
from a radical terrorist group
in order to protect the first
baby in eighteen years. Alex, a minor character in Children of Men, plays a Rubik's Cube-like game using an interactive glove device. He is portrayed as a passive, almost zombified youth figure. Example 2:
Children of
Men Children of Men
shows a more
realistic, near
future. Example 1:
Tron: Legacy Example 2:
Inception Example 3:
The MAtrix Tron: Legacy, a sequel to
the cult classic, Tron,
features a video-game-like
world called "the Grid"
where the characters must
compete in games to survive. The film Inception revolves around the concept of shared, controlled dreaming, creating an alternate, "dream-reality." In the classic sci-fi film, The Matrix, characters "plug-in" to a program called the Matrix, a world created by machines. A "recognizer" lands in the Grid. A "program" is pitted against a young "user," Flynn in a deadly game called Disk Wars. Saito realizes that he is dreaming
and takes action. The light bike champion takes his victory walk. One of the machines used to sedate and dream in Inception. The prophetic leader, Morpheus, ushers Neo into the reality of the Matrix. Neo awakens to see the human fields of the real world. The coded design of the Matrix. Morpheus offers Neo a chance to take either the red pill, waking up to the real world, or the blue bill, staying plugged into the Matrix. Arthur observes his sleeping "dream-team" in Inception. The ever-confusing concept of Inception. A popular sub-genre of Science
Fiction is that of "Alternate Reality"
in which characters operate within
realms parallel to the existing real
world.
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