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From roots to results

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Bogdan Isac

on 9 July 2015

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Transcript of From roots to results

Human Rights and
Psychologists
Outline
• The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: from freedom for the few to freedom for all
Eleanor Roosevelt
"We the people of the United Nations determined to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small, and to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom."
(Speech, 28 September 1948, Paris)
Magna Charta (1215)
:
freedom of the church and the barons from the king.

Droit de l’Homme et du citoyen (1789)
:
freedom for the citizens from nobility and the clergy.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948)
:
from freedom for the few to freedom for all.


Eleanor Roosevelt
:

‘UDHR: the International Magna Charta of all men
everywhere’.

Action points for associations
‘Human rights are of crucial importance to everyone in the world,
psychologists included’ (EFPA GA, 2013).

Respect for the Dignity of Persons and Peoples is a leading principle
in our ethical codes (Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists (2008).

In the Model Code to be presented this weekend to EFPA GA, are two articles:
- Respect for individual rights and dignity (3.1.)
- The psychologist is aware of the professional and scientific
responsibilities they have toward their clients, research participants, and
toward the organization and society in which they live and work. (3.3.)


Evidently, psychologists need to add to the realization of Human
Rights, to human dignity and human freedom.

Freedom fits the humanistic tradition of psychology: self-realisation and autonomy


Freedom is the goal of morality.
(Kant, 1724–1804)
• Every national association of psychologists needs a human rights group.

• And policy for education of psychologists in human rights.

• In national human rights institutes the profession of psychology should be represented.

Education of Psychologists in Human Rights

Psychology as a science and as a profession has accumulated a great deal of knowledge and expertise on the psychological mechanisms through which violations of Human Rights come about institutionally and in everyday life. There is also substantial research in psychology that has relevance for public policy.’ (Policy paper of the TF Human Rights, 2015)
Human rights education is effective, also in higher education; through seminars knowledge of human rights and appreciation of their importance was shown to increase (Sommer & Stellmacher, 2009).
Actions include:
o Raising awareness of human rights
o Articulating human rights in codes of ethics
o Promoting human rights and motivating for taking responsibilities
o Prevention of human rights violations, e.g. speaking out in public or to the responsible authorities in case of e.g. bullying on the workplace
o Bringing human rights violations to court
o Alleviation of violations, trauma treatment

From Roots to Results
Human Rights, a societal responsibility for psychologists:
implications for professional education.


Polli Hagenaars ,
EFPA Task Force Human Rights

‘Morality and humanity are the basis of our existence’
(David Grossman, 2015)

• Human Rights and Psychologists:
- normative frame for action
- contribution to human rights
- social-science perspective on human rights

• Focus on actions
• Education of psychologists in Human Rights

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.’
(article 1, UDHR)


‘We are one people’ (President Roosevelt) .
Freedom for children.

The Geneva Declaration (LON, 1924)
,
a historic document, recognised and affirmed for the first time the existence of rights specific to children and the responsibility of adults towards children.


Declaration of the Rights of the Child (1959)
,
a logical follow-up to the UDHR.


The International Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989).

The Geneva Declaration
(1924)
A social science perspective on
Human Rights

The concept of freedom has an even broader approach in the Human Development and Capability Approach of the Nobel price winning economist and philosopher Amartya Sen.
Human rights are
:
• Recognized freedoms, entitlements of a person to the development and realization of his or her capabilities’.
• Strong ethical pronouncements as to what should be DONE for the development and realization of people’s capabilities’.
(Sen, 2009, ‘societal ethics’ (p. 361))

Martha Nussbaum listed 10 ‘capabilities’
as basic for everyone’s life in a civilized society.
To Sen and Nussbaum the concept of freedom means really
inclusiveness, also for groups and individuals in disadvantaged
and minority positions.
Amartya Sen:

‘Human rights are strong ethical pronouncements.’
Martha Nussbaum:

‘Moral responsibility goes together with political solidarity.’
1. The Human Rights declaration forms a normative frame for psychologists and their associations.

2. Psychologists and their associations can contribute to human rights.

Human rights and psychology is a bi-directional traffic:
‘Human Rights as a normative frame can be a great inspiration for psychologists and their associations.’

(Policy paper of the TF Human Rights, 2015)
Actions are the responsibility of individual psychologists and their associations, local, national and international.

Such actions are to be directed at human rights of individuals, groups and the society at large.
Psychologists’ contributions to
human rights
We cannot take the entire burden, but we have to help carry it.
Ideals:
• Education in human rights has to be part of the curriculum of education programs in psychology.
• Education in human rights has to be part of CPD (continuous professional development).
The EFPA Task Force has submitted to the EIUC in Venice a proposal for an expert meeting on human rights education for psychologists.

The meeting will address the essentials (knowledge, attitude and skills) for education.

Outcomes will include suggestions for curricula and a winter school for students and professionals.

Giorgio de Finis, Museo dell’ Altro e dell’Altrove di Metropoliz, Roma
Reality:
• The good examples of Sommer & Stellmacher have no equivalence in the Netherlands. A couple of students looked for human rights items in the curricula of all the university psychology programs. And they found … nothing at all.
ECP2015, Milan July 10, 2015
Psychology matters in Human Rights -
Human Rights matter in Psychology
(Policy paper of the Task Force Human Rights, 2015)
Human rights are about freedoms
for ALL persons to realize their
‘capabilities’.

Psychologists have the responsibility
and the expertise to contribute.

‘Morality and humanity are the basis of our profession’

Symposium A

Polli Hagenaars, Human Rights, an implication for professional education for psychologists.
Artemis Giotsa, Human Rights in Europe (Greece).
Nora Sveaass, Psychologists, Human Rights and ethics - societal responsibilities of psychologists.
Kerstin Söderström, How can psychological knowledge and formal procedures contribute to strengthen Children’s Rights?
Ulrich Wagner, discussant
Symposium A

Polli Hagenaars, Human Rights, an implication for professional education for psychologists.
Artemis Giotsa, Human Rights in Europe (Greece).
Nora Sveaass, Psychologists, Human Rights and ethics - societal responsibilities of psychologists.
Kerstin Söderström, How can psychological knowledge and formal procedures contribute to strengthen Children’s Rights?
Ulrich Wagner, discussant
Symposium B

Ioannis N. Dimitrakopoulos, The contribution of psychologists in promoting Human Rights in the European Union through their work.
Janel Gauthier, The evolution of documents asserting Human Rights: Implications for
Human Rights promotion and education.
Peter Kinderman, Embedding Human Rights into the professional duties of psychologists.
Ava Thompson, Children’s Rights and psychology education and training: Advancing children’s well-being in the global community.
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