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Science Unit Plan: K-6

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Rebecca Snay

on 30 April 2013

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Transcript of Science Unit Plan: K-6

Change and constancy



By Rebecca Wainacht Big idea of Unit NGSS 5-PS1 Matter and Its Interactions
The amount (weight) of matter is conserved when it changes form, even in transitions in which it seems to vanish. (5-PS1-2)

Objective: Students will measure the weight of the powdered drink mix and the water before and after dissolving, using accurate calculations.

Connection to Big Idea: Does the amount of matter change when it changes form?

Literature:
Dicker, K. (2011). Properties of matter. New York: Windmill Books. Fifth Grade NGSS Forces and Interaction
Pushes and pulls can have different strengths and directions. (KPS2-1),(K-PS2-2)
Pushing or pulling on an object can change the speed or direction of its motion and can start or stop it. (K-PS2-1),(K-PS2-2)

Objective: Through exploring different forces on a ball, student will determine one way in which they can change the speed of a ball and explain the change in speed (faster, slower, stopped).

Connection to Big Idea: How does the push or pull change the direction or speed of the object in motion?

Literature:
•Twist, C. (2006). Force & motion. New York: Bearport Pub..
•Mason, A., & Davila, C. (2005). Move it!: motion, forces and you. Toronto: Kids Can Press. Kindergarten NGSS Waves
PS4.A: Wave Properties: Sound can make matter vibrate, and vibrating matter can make sound. (1-PS4-1)

Objective: Through exploring different objects (tuning fork, guitar string and drum with paperclips on it), students will identify one way to show that vibrating matter can make sound and identify the type of matter that is vibrating.

Connection to Big Idea: How does the sound change the matter? How does the matter change the sound?

Literature:
•Twist, C. (2006). Light & sound. New York: Bearport Pub. Co..
•Murray, J. (2007). Sound and hearing. Edina, MN: ABDO Pub.. First Grade NGSS PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter
Different properties are suited to different purposes. (2-PS1-2),(2-PS1-3)
A great variety of objects can be built up from a small set of pieces. (2-PS1-3)

Objective: With one set of blocks, students will construct an object and then disassemble the object and construct a new object with the same pieces.

Connection to Big Idea: How can you change the object into something else for a different purpose? Second Grade NGSS 3-LS3 Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
The environment affects the traits that an organism develops. (3-LS3-2)

Objective: Students will keep an observation log of two plants, one watered regularly with sunlight and one watered less frequently with the same amount of sunlight, describing how each plant develops.

Connection to Big Idea: How does the environment change the way in which the organism develops?

Literature:
•Bergman, L. (2007). Talking with a habitat scientist. Nashua, NH: Delta Education. Third Grade NGSS 4-ESS1 Earth’s Place in the Universe
The History of Planet Earth Local, regional, and global patterns of rock formations reveal changes over time due to earth forces, such as earthquakes.

Objective: Students will observe a rock and identify two ways in which the formation of the rock suggests changes in landscape overtime.

Connection to Big Idea: How does earth change over time?



Literature:
Hooper, M., & Coady, C. (1996). The pebble in my pocket: a history of our Earth. New York, N.Y.: Viking.
Christian, P., & Lember, B. H. (2000). If you find a rock. San Diego: Harcourt. Fourth Grade NGSS MS-ESS3 Earth and Human Activity
Humans depend on Earth’s land, ocean, atmosphere, and biosphere for many different resources. Minerals, fresh water, and biosphere resources are limited, and many are not renewable or replaceable over human lifetimes. These resources are distributed unevenly around the planet as a result of past geologic processes. (MS-ESS3-1)

Objective: Students will identify and define renewable and nonrenewable resources and explain the differences between them. (PLT, pg 69).

Connection to Big Idea: How does human activity change the sustainable yield of renewable resources?

Literature:
•Bowden, Rob. Waste, Recycling and Reuse: Our Impact on the Planet. Raintree Publishers. 2002.
•D’Alusisio, Faith and Peter Menzel. Hungry Planet: What the World Eats. Ten Speed Press. 2005. Sixth Grade Grade Level: 6
Lesson Length: 50 minutes

Content Standards:NGSS Sixth Grade: MS-ESS3 Earth and Human Activity

ESS3.A: Natural Resources
•Humans depend on Earth’s land, ocean, atmosphere, and biosphere for many different resources. Minerals, fresh water, and biosphere resources are limited, and many are not renewable or replaceable over human lifetimes. These resources are distributed unevenly around the planet as a result of past geologic processes. (MS-ESS3-1) Connection to Big Idea: How does human activity change the sustainable yield of renewable resources?

Objective: Students will identify and define renewable and nonrenewable resources and explain the differences between them. (Taken from Project Learning Tree, pg 69).

Vocabulary:
Nonrenewable resources: exist in finite or limited amounts
Renewable resources: can be replenished through natural and/or human processes

Assessment: Have each student write in his or her own words what renewable and nonrenewable resources are. Listen to the team’s discussions and note how they work together in listening to different opinions and reaching some consensus answers. Material/Resources:
Bowden, Rob. Waste, Recycling and Reuse: Our Impact on the Planet. Raintree Publishers. 2002.

D’Alusisio, Faith and Peter Menzel. Hungry Planet: What the World Eats. Ten Speed Press. 2005.

Part A: copies of the student page Initiation: Write the terms “renewable resources” and “nonrenewable resources” on the board. Have students write a definition or give a few examples for each. Divide the class in teams of four. Explain that teams will be working together to come up with a one or two sentence definition for each of the terms. Lesson Development: Give each team a copy of the student page. Have them cut out the clues and give one to each team member. Students should read their clue card and share the information with the rest of their team. Then, each team should use these bits of information to synthesize a definition for “renewable resources” and “nonrenewable resources.” Everyone on the team should understand each of the clues and agree with their team’s definition. Students should then discuss the questions on the student page, with one member designated to record their responses and one designated to report them.

http://www.plt.org/stuff/contentmgr/files/1/72b356573a05d6726acfc9602b4fab50/files/activity_14_student_pages.pdf

http://www.plt.org/stuff/contentmgr/files/1/72b356573a05d6726acfc9602b4fab50/files/act14_student_work3.jpg

http://www.plt.org/stuff/contentmgr/files/1/72b356573a05d6726acfc9602b4fab50/files/act14_student_work2.jpg

Closure: Review each of the questions with the entire group, with each team reporting its answers. Have students compare their earlier responses with the group’s definitions.

Differentiated Instruction:
•Key vocabulary, prior
•Paired/cooperative learning
•Nonlinguistic representations
•Hands-on learning
•Higher order thinking

Project learning tree: environmental education activity guide : Pre K-8. (7th ed.). (2013). Washington, DC: American Forest Foundation. Connection to Math:

CCSS Measurement and Data

Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter. Connection to Reading

CCSS Informational Text

Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe key ideas. Math Connection

Measure the height and width of the first and second object. How did the dimensions change? Connection to writing:
Student will write a lab report at the end of the experiment. (Nature of Science: wondering, investigating, questioning, data collecting and analyzing)

CCSS Writing

Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.

Provide reasons that support the opinion.

Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons.

Provide a concluding statement or section. Connection to Reading

CCSS Informational Text

Refer to details and examples in a text when when drawing inferences from the text.

Explain events or concepts in a historical, scientific or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. Connection to Math

Students will measure the weights and compare using accurate calculations.

They may have to measure the powder in a container and subtract the weight of the container. Connection to Reading

CCSS Informational Text

Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
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