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Copy of Teaching Poetic Devices and Figurative Language Through Song Lyrics

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Wade Gardner

on 7 January 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Teaching Poetic Devices and Figurative Language Through Song Lyrics

By: Brooke Niesen and Lydia Voura Teaching Poetic Devices
and Figurative Language
Through Song Lyrics Common Reactions
to Poetry "Ughhh do we have to start poetry today?"
"Why are we doing this? Poetry sucks!"
"Poetry is boring!"
"Poetry is stupid and doesn't make sense."
"I don't get poetry."
"Can we watch a movie instead?" Rationale Use of poetic devices and figurative language makes writing more vivid, exciting, descriptive, and interesting.

Understanding the use of these devices and figurative language helps students interpret the mood, meaning, and theme of poetry.

Students often feel intimidated when studying poetry, so introducing poetic devices and figurative language in song lyrics eases students into the poetry unit. Curriculum Expectations
Met Poetic Devices in Song Lyrics http://youtu.be/5TI18KxwbMk Examples:
• Bob is compared to a wolf.
• Sue (or Sue’s scent) and rose (or the rose’s scent) are being compared. Examples:
• Bob and wolf are the two things being compared, using “as”
• Sue & rose are the two things being compared, using “like” Simile
“Life After You”- Daughtry
“For What It’s Worth”-Buffalo Springfield
“Cowboy Casanova”- Carrie Underwood
“Domino”- Jessie J Poetic Devices in Song Lyrics Poetic Devices in Song Lyrics http://youtu.be/5TI18KxwbMk “Firework” by Katy Perry Examples:
Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink.
Surrounded by water in the ocean, but none of it is drinkable.
The directions were as clear as mud.
Obviously, they weren’t very clear directions). Irony/ Paradox Examples:
When the game is over, a true champion we’ll discover.
“over” and “discover”
What would I have to prove, to show you how much I love?
“prove” and “love” Rhyme: Eye Rhyme Examples:
Bright night, a full moon above.
“bright” and “night”
We will stay today and then we must go.
“stay” and “today” Rhyme: Internal Rhyme EXAMPLE: "Back in Black" by AC/DC

Back in black
I hit the sack
I've been too long I'm glad to be back
Yes I'm, let loose
From the noose Rhyme: True/
Pure Rhyme Onomatopoeia Examples:
Talking and walking, hours on end.
Repetition of the “ah” sound in “talking” “walking”
A turtle in the fertile soil.
Repetition of the “er” sound in “turtle” “fertile” Assonance Alliteration Personification Metaphor Simile Poetic Devices in Song Lyrics Poetic Devices
and Figurative Language
“Life After You”- Daughtry
“For What It’s Worth”-Buffalo Springfield
“Cowboy Casanova”- Carrie Underwood
“Domino”- Jessie J Poetic Devices in Song Lyrics Examples:
It’s hard work doing nothing.
Youth is wasted on the young.
The more we know, the less we understand. … Hyperbole Examples:
On top of the hill, / the moon is full.
“hill” and “full”
Give this to the man, / he’ll know what I mean.
“man” and “mean” Rhyme: Near/ Half/ Impure Rhyme Daughtry "Life After You" Extended Activity #1 Daughtry
Handout Poetic Devices and Figurative Language Handout A comparison of two things (that may or not be alike) using the words like or as. A comparison of two unlike things without using like or as. (Things = person, place, thing, or thought) A type of metaphor in which non-human things or ideas possess human qualities or actions. Words which end with the same sounds, usually
at the end of lines. An obvious and deliberate exaggeration (to emphasize something or for humorous purposes). Overall Expectation•Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text
forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning Specific Expectations
• identify a variety of text features and explain how they help
communicate meaning
• identify a variety of elements of style in texts, including increasingly complex texts, and explain how they help communicate meaning and enhance the effectiveness of the texts divide class into groups (ideally 4 or 5 students per group)
provide each group with song lyrics
examples Carrie Underwood "Cowboy Casanova"
Jessie J "Domino"
Katy Perry "Firework"
Buffalo Springfield “For What It’s Worth” Have students identify, label, and explain the type of figurative language or poetic devices used in the song lyrics. Extended
Activity #2 similar to activity #1
students are asked to find their own song lyrics and work independently
have students identify, label, and explain at least 4 types of figurative language or poetic devices used in the song lyrics.
to be handed in for an individual grade Extended
Activity #3 a variation of Readers Theatre
students will determine a common theme and find lyrics with poetic devices/figurative language
students are asked to create a script compiling the song lyrics
students will present script to the class in a creative way Theory Questions? Materials and
Resources computer and projection screen (Power Point and YouTube Video)
poetic Devices Handout
Daughtry Assignment
lyrics for songs
computer lab Benefits Limitations makes poetic devices and figurative language relatable and relevant
engages students
opportunity for students to take ownership over their work
poetry becomes less intimidating
eases students into poetry unit students may have difficulty finding song lyrics containing poetic devices and figurative language
non-traditional approach to studying poetry The occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words. The formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named (e.g., cuckoo, sizzle). EXAMPLE - "Firework" by Katy Perry

Do you ever feel like a plastic bag
Drifting through the wind, wanting to start again?
Do you ever feel, feel so paper thin
Like a house of cards, one blow from caving in? EXAMPLE: "Life is a Highway" by Tom Cochran

Life is a highway
I wanna ride it all night long
If you're going my way
I wanna drive it all night long EXAMPLE: "The Music of the Night" by Andrew Lloyd Webber

Nighttime sharpens, heightens each sensation.
Darkness wakes and stir imagination.
Silently the senses abandon their defenses,
Helpless to resist the notes I write,
For I compose the Music of the Night. EXAMPLE: "Boom Boom Pow" by the Black Eyed Peas

I'm on that supersonic boom
Y'all hear that spaceship zoom
When-when I step inside the room
Them girls go ape ape uh
Y'all stuck on super-8-8-8
That low-fi super 8 bit
I'm on that HD flat
This beat go boom boom bap. EXAMPLE: "Alphabet Aerobics" by Blackalicious

Artificial amateurs, aren't at all amazing
Analytically, I assault, animate things
Broken barriers bounded by the bomb beat
Buildings are broken, basically I'm bombarding... EXAMPLE: "Grenade" by Bruno Mars

I'd catch a grenade for ya
Throw my hand on a blade for ya
I'd jump in front of a train for ya
You know I'd do anything for ya
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