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"Cloud" by Sandra Cisneros

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by

Rebekah Lopez

on 27 October 2015

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Transcript of "Cloud" by Sandra Cisneros

"Cloud" by Sandra Cisneros
The Poet
And when you were a tree, you listened to the trees and the tree
things trees told you.
You were the wind in the wheels of a red
bicycle.
You were the spidery Mariatattooed on the hairless arm
of a boy in downtown Houston.
You were the rain rolling off the
waxy leaves of a magnolia tree
Who is Sandra Cisneros?
Born December 20, 1954 in Chicago, Illinois

An American writer best known for her acclaimed first novel The House on Mango Street

She grew up as the only daughter in a family of six brothers, which often made her feel isolated, and the constant migration of her family between Mexico and the United States.

Her work deals with the formation of Chicana identity, exploring the challenges of being caught between Mexican and Anglo-American cultures, facing the misogynist attitudes present in both these cultures, and experiencing poverty.

Cisneros has held a variety of professional positions, working as a teacher, a counselor, a college recruiter, a poet-in-the-schools, and an arts administrator, and has maintained a strong commitment to community and literary causes.

Cisneros currently resides in San Antonio, Texas.

"Clouds"

Before you became a cloud, you were an ocean, roiled and
murmuring like a mouth. You were the shadow of a cloud
crossing over a field of tulips. You were the tears of a
man who cried into a plaid handkerchief. You were a sky
without a hat. Your heart puffed and flowered like sheets
drying on a line.



A lock of straw-colored hair
wedged between the mottled pages of a Victor Hugo novel.
A
crescent of soap.
A spider the color of a fingernail.
The black nets
beneath the sea of olive trees.
A skein of blue wool.
A tea saucer
wrapped in newspaper.
An empty cracker tin.
A bowl of blueber-
ries in heavy cream.
White wine in a green-stemmed glass.



And when you opened your wings to wind, across the punched-
tin sky above a prison courtyard, those condemned to death and
those condemned to life watched how smooth and sweet a white
cloud glides.
What does it say?

The poem begins and ends with the cloud in the sky, but the poem is about more than clouds. It's about our surroundings and the world we sometimes take advantage of.

It draws seemingly unrelated items together--tears, a tattoo, a bowl of blueberries--and makes them meaningful and beautiful, because they are all part of the world and we can all stop to appreciate them, like the prisoners in the courtyard looking up to the sky to see "how smooth and sweet" the cloud is.
How is it said?
Cisneros uses many metaphors throughout the entire poem.

She uses metaphors to compare the person in this poem to the clouds and various things.
Ex:
"You became a cloud, you were an ocean, roiled and
murmuring like a mouth.
You were the shadows of a cloud cross-
ing over a field of tulips.
You were the tears of a man who cried
into a plaid handkerchief."
.

Alliteration is used in the third stanza. The word "A" is used six times to emphasize the importance of how beautiful our surrondings can be.
Imagery is also evident in the poem which helps This allows Cisneros to convey to the reader of the message she is trying to get across.

Her message is how the world and things we come across are beautiful and we don't realize this until we actually take the time to embrace it or we lose it.

Symbolism is also what Cisneros uses in order to help the reader to fully understand what she is trying to get across.



"Before you became a cloud, you were an ocean, roiled and
murmuring like a mouth.
You were the shadows of a cloud cross-
ing over a field of tulips.
You were the tears of a man who cried
into a plaid handkerchief."

" And when you opened your wings to wind, across the punched-
tin sky above a prison courtyard, those condemned to death and
those condemned to life watched how smooth and sweet a white
cloud glides."


Work Cited
"Cloud". Poetry Soup. Web Oct 2015

http:www.poetrysoup.com/famous/poem/23149/cloud

"Sandra Ciseneros". Wikipedia. Web Oct 2015

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandra_Cisneros
Full transcript