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Interactive Read Aloud

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Amy Atkinson

on 19 July 2013

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Transcript of Interactive Read Aloud

TEACHING YOUNG CHILDREN
THROUGH
INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD


CRITICALLY IMPORTANT!
Too often children (and some adults) consider the read-aloud as a time to doze, dream, fiddle, and snack. Read-aloud should be seen as the heart of our reading instruction time!
INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES & GUIDELINES #1
Solution
How important is
interactive reading aloud?
PURPOSE
Reading aloud to children has long been supported as the most important means to motivate and demonstrate for children the strategies and motivations for reading. Research says the the single most important activity for building the knowledge of eventual success in reading is reading aloud to children (Pearson Custom Education, 2012, pg. 305).
Choose the Skill You Want to Teach
One place to start is by looking at the Common Core reading standards. Think about the comprehension and vocabulary skills each student needs to have to be a successful reader. Once you have started exploring the skills successful readers need, you will start to see areas where your students need more practice. You can easily give them the needed practice by adjusting the amount of days (or weeks) you spend on the skill.

Lucy Calkins, The Art of Teaching Reading

INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES & GUIDELINES #3
Plan Your Interactive
Read Aloud Lesson

The main difference between an Interactive Read Aloud and a regular read aloud is that your students will be actively thinking, reflecting, and responding to the text. There are many ways to make your lesson more interactive. Here are three examples:

1. Turn and Talk: Assign thinking partners that students sit next to during group lessons. My group lessons are

almost always on our classroom rug. The students know that when they are on the rug, they are sitting next to their partner. In nearly EVERY one of my lessons, I give the students a chance to share their thinking with their partner. For example, during an Interactive Read Aloud -­ "Is this character likeable, why or why not? Turn and tell your partner what you think".

2. Sign Language: Instead of asking for volunteers to answer a question, start expecting everyone to think and respond. Sign language is perfect for this! Thumbs up = I agree (or I understand). Thumbs down = I disagree (I don't understand). Thumbs sideways = I am not sure (or I "kind of" get it). When students make a "connection" let them show you with a symbol rather than blurting. There are so many simple hand signals your students can use to show you their thinking during your read aloud.

3. Stop and Jot: Ask your students to bring their reading notebook to the read aloud area. At different points in the text, let them write a response. These responses can be as short or long as you like. Sometimes a one word response requires more rigorous thinking than a full page report!

Lucy Calkins, The Art of Teaching Reading


STUDENT
ACCOUNTABILITY

INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD
INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES & GUIDELINES #4

The whole reason we teach reading skills is that we hope the students start using these skills independently in their own reading.
RESEARCH SHOWS... - Students learn to read by reading continuous text. There are many times during the school day when students will focus on how to spell a word, the relationship between letters and sounds, or the meaning of a word, but it is essential that they spend the bulk of their time processing continuous text. (Fountas & Pinnell) -­ Interactive engagement activities engage more of the brain than listening activities.

INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD
INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES & GUIDELINES #2
SELECTION OF TEXT
According to Fountas and Pinnell, ten text factors are important to consider when selecting texts for any kind of reading instruction.
The following figure provides descriptions of all ten text factors, in terms of interactive read aloud (Fountas & Pinnell, Figure 1-3) :
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