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'Sleeping Freshman Never Lie'

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Alex Aiello

on 14 August 2015

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Transcript of 'Sleeping Freshman Never Lie'

Sleeping Freshman Never Lie
(my summer reading book) is written by David Lubar. It was published in 2005 as a realistic fiction book.
Bibliographic Info.-
Characters-
There are many characters in this book. The protagonist is Scott Hudson, an upcoming freshmen. As he starts to narrate his story, he says, "We plunged toward the future without a clue. Tonight, we were four sweaty guys heading home from a day spent shooting hoops. Tomorrow, I couldn't even guess what would happen." (pg. 1) He wasn't very excited about high school; especially with everything else going on in his life (ex: his mom's pregnancy). Even so ,throughout the book you can see how caring he is, and that he has a good heart. The antagonist, however, is a stuck-up Vernon, a senior who dates Julia, his best friend (and now crush) from kindergarten. He's mean (even to Julia), and tries to push people around. On page 85, he reads the first addition of the sports section, "I'm the quarterback," Vernon said. "he's supposed to write about me." He jabbed a finger at the paper. "Anybody know this idiot?"

Conflict- Man vs. Man
As with many great novels and stories,
Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie
has four types of conflict. Man vs. man, for instance, would be Wesley and Vernon. After Mouth publishes "A Football Feast", Vernon is really angry, and tries to beat up Scott. This is a piece from page 182.

"Vernon grabbed my shirt in one fist. His knuckles looked like walnuts. "You write for the school paper?" I nodded again, and I could feel his fist tighten."

Then, Wesley comes in and saves Scott from getting a total beatdown. "Hey, Scott. What's up?" I looked over to my right. "Everything okay?" Wesley asked. Instead of waiting for me to answer, he shifted his eyes toward Vernon. I felt the grip loosen on my shirt, like Vernon had been hit by one of those blowgun darts that paralyzes all your muscles." (pg. 182-183)

Setting-
The setting of the story is at Scott's high school, J.P Zenger High, and is taking place throughout his freshman year. The main events in this story are that Scott's mom is having a baby, and he's just starting high school all at once. This setting influences the plot, changing Scott's life tremendously as he experiences high school for the first time.
Alexandra Aiello
Hill
9th Gifted LA/pd 2
13 August 2015

Sleeping Freshman Never Lie
Conflict- Man vs. Nature
For man vs. nature, there's the times before Christmas break when Scott and the rest of the kids in P.E had to run outside - in freezing weather. "He's trying to kill us," I gasped. Bits of frost coated my words as they left my mouth. "Cold air is good for us," Kyle said. "Maybe if we were T.V dinners." I couldn't believe that Mr. Cravutto was still dragging the class outside. "Doesn't he have a calendar? Or a thermometer?" (p.120) Here, Scott is fighting against the forces of nature to stay warm while passing P.E with a teacher that says stuff like, "Make your own heat!" (p.120).
Conflict- Man vs. Himself
Scott goes through man vs. himself many times, but I think it's especially important when he's walking Julia home, because it shows what kind of person he truly is. She ends up saying to him, "I guess you already have a date for the dance..." (p.255) Then, even though she's his crush, and Lee turned him down, he tells her, "I've asked someone." (p.255) He knew the right thing to do was try to take Lee, even though he felt conflicted. That's not only man vs. himself; that's a good person.
Conflict- Man vs. Society
Even before Scott got into the building, he experienced man vs. society. This is a piece of what he wrote about being on the bus. "I sat up front. That wasn't much better, since every big kid who got on at the rest of the stops had a chance to smack my head." (p.13) This shows that society was already against him because they could tell he was a freshman.
Literary Devices
Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie has many examples of literary devices. From Tom Swifties to hyperboles, this book has it all. For example, there's a hyperbole on page 182, when Scott is surrounded by Vernon and his friends and says, "I felt like I was getting a tour of Mt. Rushmore." There's also a funny simile on page 198, when Scott is searching for Lee. He finds her, and she says, "I'd say you run like a girl, but that's a sexist attitude." On the first day of school, there's personification that said, "Zenger High was huge. It sprawled out like a hotel that had a desperate desire to become an octopus." Lastly, there's this metaphor that goes like this, "So, for reasons totally beyond our control, I'm Mandy's sports slave." (pg. 68)
Personal Reflection
Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie
is probably one of my new favorite books, because as it progressed, many of my predictions/hopes for the ending did too. Like, at the bus stop, when Scott first saw Julia, I thought this was just going to be a classic high school love story. I really wanted him to end up with her, since he thought stuff like, "Life would be so much easier if she's just say something stupid so I could kick the habit of worshiping her." (pg. 33) But after I started to get to know Lee's character, I could tell they had even more in common and would also be a great couple. Even so, when Scott said "I've asked someone." (pg. 255) I felt sorry for him, considering how much he'd tried to get her attention before. As for Wesley, I think he was the big brother figure Scott needed, since his parents were readying the house for the baby and couldn't spend as much time with him. He saved him from a beat up, got him a limo for the dance, and gave him rides, just to name a few. And, his mom was driven to the hospital in that limo! What a climax! As soon I started reading this book, I couldn't put it down, and the ending was my favorite kind; happy and unpredictable.
Plot Graph
Exposition: Scott is an upcoming freshmen who's about to start high school.
Rising Actions:
-Scott finds out his mom's pregnant, and starts the survival guide for his sibling.
-Scott ends up in tons of after school activities to try to be around Julia (crush).
-Scott makes new friends like Lee and Wesley. Wesley helps keep him safe, and Lee shares his love of books. But when he's jerky to her, he tries to make it up to her by taking her to the dance.
Climax: On the way to the dance, Scott, Lee, and Wesley see Scott's parents trying to get to the hospital, because his mom has gone into labor. They end up taking her, and then going to the dance, where Scott confesses feelings - for Lee.
Falling action/Resolution: Sean is born and Scott is still writing, even though school's over. He promises Sean in his guide that he will always be there for him, and tells him about the books and the plastic tool set his parents bought for him. Bobby's got a concert tour, and he bought them a new computer with his first check. Scott also finds a program at a community college that helps people with reading problems like Bobby, who never learned. So, despite all the twists and turns, everything ends up to be alright in the end.
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