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Sonnet 55 by William Shakespeare

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Tala Faraj

on 9 April 2014

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Transcript of Sonnet 55 by William Shakespeare

Sonnet 55 by William Shakespeare
Question 1, Quatrain 2
When wasteful war shall statues overturn,
And broils root out the work of masonry,
Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn
The living record of your memory.

Question 1, Quatrain 3
'Gainst death and all
oblivious enmity
Shall
you

pace forth
;
your

praise shall still find room
Even in the eyes
of all
posterity

That wear this world out
to
the ending doom
.

Question 1, Quatrain 1
Not marble nor the
gilded monuments
Of
princes
shall
outlive
this
powerful rime
,
But you shall shine more bright in these
contents

Than
unswept stone
,
besmear'd
with
sluttish time
.

Question 2
Question 3
Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn
The living record of your memory.

"The living record of your memory" is inferred to be the poem itself, where it is said that neither a God
nor his sword nor fire will destroy a mere piece of
paper filled with words.
Question 4
"Shall" used build up "you" (poem)
add more power

apply idea starting now
back to reality
Not marble nor the gilded monuments
Of princes shall outlive this powerful rime,
But you shall shine more bright in these contents
Than unswept stone, besmeared with sluttish time.
When wasteful war shall statues overturn,
And broils root out the work of masonry,
Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn
The living record of your memory.
'Gainst death and all oblivious enmity
Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room
Even in the eyes of all posterity
That wear this world out to the ending doom.
So, till the judgment that yourself arise,
You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes.

About the Author
Question 1, Couplet
So, till the
judgment
that yourself
arise
,

You

live
in
this
, and dwell in
lovers' eyes
.

unmindful, unaware
a feeling or condition of hostility
Keep moving forward, live on
POETRY
Future Generation
The love for poetry
Be present
Always
Will
In the opinion
Use untill it no longer serves its purpose
POETRY
End of humanity
DEATH IMAGERY
'Gainst death
Ending doom
THE FAULT IN OUR STARS
SONNET 55
IN DEFENSE OF POETRY

Allusion
Tomb of Henry VII
Died in 1509
lines or poem
Personification
Poem will last
POERTY IS IMMORTAL
“Some infinities are bigger than other infinities.”
“There will come a time when all of us are dead. All of us. There will come a time when there are no human beings remaining to remember that anyone ever existed or that our species ever did anything. There will be no one left to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra, let alone you. Everything that we did and built and wrote and thought and discovered will be forgotten and all of this will have been for naught. Maybe that time is coming soon and maybe it is millions of years away, but even if we survive the collapse of our sun, we will not survive forever."

"rhyme" or poem
damaged
Dirty time
Personification
"Sure, anyone can name fourteen dead people.
But we're disorganized mourners, so a lot of people end up remembering Shakespeare and no one ends up remembering the person he wrote Sonnet Fifty-five about”


Gold
Dusty Gravestones
Living, full of power
Immortal
Shakespeare's Sonnets
26 April 1564(baptised)-23 April 1616
Known as the greatest writer in English literature.
38 plays, 154 sonnets, 5 long poems.
Early plays were comedies and histories, then wrote tragedies (Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, Macbeth)
Enriched vocabulaies and influenced the development of the English language.
Plays and poems have many meanings that we can all relate to.
154 sonnets over his career.
2 sets(
1-126
to an identified "young man".
127-152
to a mysterious "dark lady".)
Themes such as passage of time, love, beauty and mortality.
Sonnet 55
The 55th sonnet out of shakespeares 154 sonnets.
Follows the theme of time and immortalization.
Overall poem structure: Shakespearean sonnet
Narrated through first person point of view.
Overall tone: Confidence, hope
Sonnet 55 is a half-sad, half-confident meditation on love and poetry's power to preserve it.
General theme of
time
and
immortality
.
Shakespeare's desire to immortalize his lover, not himself, through poetry.
War and death may come and go, destroying buildings, art, even physical bodies, but poetry is forever, eternal, immortal.
Everything is subject to decay and aging, but because this beautiful person is memorialized in sonnet 55, his memory will stay fresh and vibrant forever.
Sonnet 55 preserves specific moments together, just like a diary.
Shakespeare outwits the violence and sadness of time by writing a poetic diary.
Lover living in poem.
Poem is immortal

Not marble nor the gilded monuments
Of princes
shall
outlive this powerful rime,
But you
shall
shine more bright in these contents
Than unswept stone, besmeared with sluttish time.
When wasteful war
shall
statues overturn,
And broils root out the work of masonry,
Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire
shall
burn
The living record of your memory.
'Gainst death and all oblivious enmity
Shall
you pace forth; your praise
shall
still find room
Even in the eyes of all posterity
That wear this world out to the ending doom.
So,
till
the judgment that yourself arise,

You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes.
Immortality of Poetry
For the future generations
to contemplate
"for it acts in a divine and unapprehended manner , beyond and above conciousness"
"and it is reserved for future generations to contemplate and measure the mighty cause and effect in all strength and splendor of their union"
Alliteration
When destructive wars occur, even
majestic and massive statues will collapse.

Battles will "uproot" and destroy art which has been carved into stone.
Royalty
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. (Sonnet 43)
by Elizabeth Barrett Browning
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints – I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life! – and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
SIMILAR STRUCTURE
THEME: LOVE
PRESERVE MEMORIES
Connection- Famous Artworks
http://henrytudorsociety.wordpress.com/tag/westminster-abbey/
Irony
Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep
by Mary Elizabeth Frye
Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there. I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunligh on the ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft starts that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry;
I am not there. I did not die.
Yasir
Leonardo da Vinci

Whenever you think of famous artwork, Mona Lisa will be on your mind.
Mona Lisa is "
eternal
" and "
immortal
".
Even after the painting is destroyed, people will still remember it.
Neither the God of War (Mars) nor his sword nor the fires of war will destroy

The living record of your memory. (The poem itself)
Mythological Allusion,
The God of War -> Mars
Use of assonance when
words end with the
same sound "Mars", "War's"
IRONY
LOVE



Family Love


'Gainst death and all oblivious enmity

Even in the eyes of all posterity

Dulce et Decorum est
Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.
Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime.—
Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
In all my dreams before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.
If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.
Allusion to judgement day
Connection to "In Defense of Poetry"

-"
Nor Mars, his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn the living record of your memory
" - Sonnet 55
-"
Even in the eyes of all posterity
" - Sonnet 55

-"
They were unveiled to the depths in these immortal creations
:" - Shelley
-"
Poetry thus makes immortal all that is best and most beautiful in the world;
" - Shelley



The Mahabharata - a 5000 year old epic (lengthy narrative poem) of over 90 000 couplets

The Ramayana - another epic over 9000 years old, but now speculated to be older
allusion to JUDGEMENT DAY in the bible
"You" is the young man that Shakespeare is talking to in the poem
"This" is referring to the poem, which will live forever
live in this - person will live forever in this poem

POWERFUL RIME
When Shakespear mentions the powerful rime, he is referring to this sonnet, and saying that it will last forever, like the momuments and statues
The man Shakespear is talking about in the sonnet is dead, and he wishes that he will be remembered forever, and writes this powerful poem in memory of him
Person already dead
Fortelling the future
Ability of poetry to be eternal
"Not marble, nor the gilded monuments of princes, Shall outlive this powerful rhyme"
- Sonnet 55

-"
The powerfull play goes on and you may contribute a verse
" - Dead Poets Society, "O Me! O Life!" by Walt Whitman

lovers' eyes - plural

And just as it is appointed for man to die once, and after that comes judgment (Hebrews 9:27)
Walt Whitman - Oh Me! Oh Life!
Oh me! Oh life! of the questions of these recurring,
Of the endless trains of the faithless, of cities fill’d with the foolish,
Of myself forever reproaching myself, (for who more foolish than I, and who more faithless?)
Of eyes that vainly crave the light, of the objects mean, of the struggle ever renew’d,
Of the poor results of all, of the plodding and sordid crowds I see around me,
Of the empty and useless years of the rest, with the rest me intertwined,
The question, O me! so sad, recurring—What good amid these, O me, O life?


Answer.
That you are here—that life exists and identity,
That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse.
The Bible
But concerning that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but the Father only. (Matthew 24:36)
- Bible is immortal
- Written 2000 years ago and still read today
Full transcript