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How to Write an Outline/Speech

A quick guide to writing an outline/speech for Mr. Cone's class
by

David Cone

on 4 September 2014

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Transcript of How to Write an Outline/Speech

Basic Speech Formula
Introduction
Body
Conclusion
Introduction
Conclusion
Body
The top bun and bottom bun hold the burger together the same way the intro and conclusion hold a speech together.
Additionally, the top bun and the bottom bun are made up of the same stuff (bread), but shaped differently. Thus, when you get to the conclusion of your speech, use the same "ingredients" or parts from your intro. Just put them in a different order.
The body is the "meat" of the speech.
Hook/Attention-Getting Device (AGD)
Thesis Statement
Preview Main Points
The most effective hooks (must relate to your topic) include:
questions
- Interrogative - expect a response
- Rhetorical - don’t expect a respons
anecdotes
- personal stories with a point to them
stories from history or famous people
famous quotes
(from famous people: sometimes poetry, song lyrics, movie dialogue, or lines from literature)
Jokes/humor
Bold statement
(startling)
Fact/statistic
Visual aids
Make a reference
For a speech, a basic thesis might sound something like: "Today I am going to tell you about..." As you improve as a public speaker, you will learn how to "hide the formula" with more advanced phrasing.
Known as a preview, overview, or roadmap.
Sample Introduction
I will be the first to admit I am pretty lazy. The
most exercise I get is when I pick up the remote control to switch channels,
push the buttons on the phone to order my pizza, or when I have to get up to
answer the door to get my pizza. Lately, I have been noticing that I get
winded doing those activities, I just don't seem to have any energy. This is why I am going to show you how to exercise so that you
can increase your energy level. I will show you the proper clothes to wear, some leg and stomach exercises, and finally how to cool down.
Similar to a Burger
Where you prove your point.
State your main ideas and supporting details.
Usually 3 Main Points
Try to give equal time to all.
Details: Provide information that breaks down the supporting material to pinpoint accuracy.
Ex. Men are at 40% greater risk than women
Ex. Smoking causes over 60% of all lung problems
Restate Main Points
Restate Thesis
Final Thought
Now you know what to wear, some different exercises, and how to relax after exercising. Exercising can make you more energetic. Now the next time you need to change the channel, you will have the energy to go to the TV and do it yourself.
Sample Conclusion
1st Main Point
2nd Main Point
3rd Main Point
This is the "Basic" Speech Formula. Once you master this, add your own "flavor" (style) and spice it up just as you would a burger. Also remember that different audiences may want different add-ons, just like how people order different additions to their burgers.
Link
Statement that connects
hook
to
thesis
makes speech flow
Connects
audience
to the topic
Connects
self
to the topic
Rules for Outline
Use standard symbols
Capital Roman Numerals (I, II, III)
Capital Letters (A, B, C)
Arabic Numerals (1, 2, 3)
Lowercase Letters (a, b, c)
Lowercase Roman numerals (i, ii, iii)
Each line should contain only one idea.
Supporting points should relate to the subject directly above it.
Indent from main point to supporting point.
Can either be key phrases or sentence style.
Use transitions
You must have at least two of the same symbol
Supporting Material:
Provides intensification and reinforcement of main headings.
Ex. Lung disease often results
Ex. Thousands die each year

The
main idea
for the speech
Establish the point of
argument
Covers the
whole
speech
Direct and specific
Ask, “What purpose am I to achieve with this speech?
The answer will be your
thesis.
Lead into the
body
Tells
audience
what to
listen
for
Usually one sentence that gives an
overview
of the major
areas
of your speech
Talk about what you have at
II., III., and IV
5% - 10%
of your speech
The end of your speech
Let your
audience
know that you are
ending.
Typically do not add any
new
info.
10% - 20%
of your overall speech
Beginning
of a speech
Where you grab the
audience
Need to start off
strong
If possible, relate intro to
yourself
and your
audience.
It sets the
tone
for the rest of your speech.
Action steps
Give incentive for
remembering
your speech
Emotional
impact
May want to refer back to your hook
How To Write a Speech
Speech Topics
Purpose
Occasion
Audience
Expectations
Experience/Background
Interests
Full transcript