Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Poetry Across Time

2012
by

Paul Hanson

on 25 May 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Poetry Across Time

Poetry Across Time Exam
Bring lots of black pens.
Pre-exam breakfast (canteen at 8.30)
Higher? Or, Foundation?
Exam starts at 9.15pm; be at the gym at 9pm.
Poetry Across Time
Seventy-five minute exam
Section A: 'Relationship' poetry
Section B: unseen poem
Forty-five minutes on Section A (36 marks)
Thirty minutes on Section B (18marks)
The First Few Minutes
Spend the first minute or two just checking you have the exam paper and a copy of 'Moon on the Tides'.
Read the paper; pick one question on the 'Relationship' poems and read through the unseen section.
Ignore every other question!
Section A: 'Relationship' Poems
Two questions to choose from; read them and then pick one.
What will the questions be on?
relationships... duh!
ideas, themes and issues
form, structure and language (inc. sound and imagery)
openings/endings
More Specific?
You might be asked to write about:
the way relationships/characters/experiences are presented
how language is used to present feelings/ideas/experiences et cetera
how structure is used to emphasise any of the above
How to Plan
Spend five to ten minutes planning Section A.
Look for quotations and other evidence you can write analytically (not descriptively) about.
Come up with four or five paragraph's worth.
Model Plan: 'Nettles' and 'Harmonium'
Getting the Marks
Respond to the text
Analysis specific detail
Evaluate the writer’s uses of language and/or structure to create effects on readers
Explore ideas/themes/settings
Compare ideas/themes/language/structure
Compare details
Exemplar Response
Both poems contain extended metaphors. For example, in 'Harmonium' Armitage uses the organ as a metaphor for his father: 'yellowed the fingernails of its keys.' Whereas in 'Nettles' Scannell uses military metaphors to describe the nettles: 'regiment of spite'.
Better Exemplar
Parent/child Relationships
How the poems relate to question
Themes
Tone
What's good?
compares a similarity
uses good evidence
shows some understanding
What's not?
too descriptive, not analytical
no evaluation of effects
Doesn't compare enough detail, methods or effects.
Both poems
contain
extended metaphors
. For example, in 'Harmonium' Armitage
uses the organ as a
clever metaphor
for his fathe
r: '
yellowed the fingernails of its keys
.'
The speaker is clearly making a direct link between the ageing, faded keyboard of the organ and his father, as, later in the poem, he describes his father’s ‘
smoker’s fingers
’, obviously yellow from the tar and nicotine. Life has clearly worn the shine off both the organ and the father, leading to them both possessing discoloured fingers/keys. Perhaps by linking the organ’s keys to father’s fingers he is trying to suggest that both were once capable of creating something beautiful but now the best years are behind them.

By contrast
, Scannell’s use of
violent, military extended metaphors
in 'Nettles' suggests an ongoing war with nature:
'regiment of spite'
and
‘green spears
’.
Here, the nettles come to represent the threats and dangers life will present to the speaker’s young son. It is clear that the speaker wishes desperately to protect his son, ‘
slashed... till not a nettle... Stood
’ but, by the end, he realises that this is not possible;
life will always throw new challenges and pains our way
: ‘
My son would often feel sharp wounds again
.’

Both poems
leave the reader reflecting on the
difficult realities life has to offer.
What's better?
analysis of language methods and effects
comments on the ideas and themes
What's not?
no comparison of detail
How to Analyse
'blisters beaded on his tender skin.
You Try
You Try
Now, pick the last line or two any of two poems. Analyse and compare how they sum up their respective poems.
Peer Assessment
Swap with your shoulder partner. As you read through, underline where you think they hit one of the criteria. Two stars and a target at the end.
Remember to:
Respond to the text
Analysis specific detail
Evaluate the writer’s uses of language and/or structure to create effects on readers
Explore ideas/themes/relationships
Compare ideas/themes/language/structure
Compare details
Selecting Poems; Finding Evidence
Which poems would you pick for the following?
familial relationships
romantic relationships
unhappy experiences
strong feelings
similar forms or structures
your two favourite poems
The Exam Paper
Discuss the two 'Relationships' options with your partner. Which would you choose and why and what evidence would you use?

(NB: if there's time later, parts A and B could be attempted in full)
Let's read the exemplar to this question: Compare how present strong emotions in 'Quickdraw' and one other poem from 'Relationships'.
You Try
Exemplar
You Try
Here is an explanation/description of the evidence. It's not bad but it's not going to secure a C grade:
This shows that the boy's been stung.
How to Analyse
'blisters beaded on his tender skin'
This is much better because it analyses perceptively:
Vulnerability of son.
Alliteration of the 'b' phoneme (sound)
Perhaps the child is stronger than he thinks.
Parent only sees the surface pain.
Suggests that life is often painful.
Emphasises how they bubble and burst.
Emphasises how parents view their children.
With your shoulder partner, analyse the follow quotations the way I did. Use your yellow books.
Try not to simply explain or describe:
'Tightly-folded bud' ('Born Yesterday')
'unexploded mine/buried deep in his mind' (The Manhunt')
'Time hates love, wants love poor' ('Hour')
'You were/the moon's eye to me/pull and grained and mantling' ('PSFMM')
'His smile, like mine, said I was nine and he was ten' ('Brothers')
Once you think you're done, compare yours with the pair opposite you.
Selecting Poems; Finding Evidence
Pick one pairing and plan the answer. You will need quotations:
Exemplar
Go back to the plan you made a few minutes ago. Now, in the style of the exemplar, write the section on tone (feelings and attitudes). The same AOs apply as before.
What's it about?
What ideas/themes/attitudes can you see?
What is the tone? What feelings are evident?
What language methods does it use to express these?
What do you notice about the structure?

NB: you don't have to compare!
Now let's read the exemplars to this question: Compare how a relationship is presented in 'The Manhunt' and one other poem from 'Relationships'.

Match the grade to the response.
Now, this time write the 'themes' section. What are the poems really about and how do poets try to express this to the reader.
Form and Structure
Form and structure are often quite hard to write about but, if you can say something insightful, there are good marks to be achieved.
Let's look at the second exemplar on the A4 handout.
Exemplar
Recap Possible Questions
You Try
Now, compare the form and structure of 'Sonnet 116' and 'Hour'.
Section B
Approaching the Unseen Poem
You Try
Let's have a look at the unseen poem entitled 'Slow Reader' in the June 2011 exam paper.

How do you think the speaker feels about the child and his experience of learning to read and how does the poet present the speaker’s feelings?
Both ‘Ghazal’ and ‘The Manhunt’ use couplets to present the relationships between the couples in the poems. Firstly, both poems are about couples, so structuring the poem this way makes sense; it echoes the two people. ‘The Manhunt’ is especially effective because one imagines the husband and wife lying side-by-side in bed, just as the two lines do. In ‘Ghazal’, a slightly different effect is achieved because the second line in every couplet ends with a ‘you/me’ sound ('cue me', 'subdue me'). Perhaps this is the speaker telling her lover that they are bound together, just like the lines of the poem.
Spend thirty minutes on this section
Read the question.
Next, read the poem.
Highlight key details as you go.
Finally...
See you in the canteen for the pre-exam lunch.
Good luck!
:-D
'Poetic methods' might include:
figurative lang. (metaphors, similes, personification)
sound patterning (alliteration, rhyme, sibilance, assonance, repetition)
metaphorical verbs
specific lexical fields (topic-specific groups of words)
word play (puns)
contrasts (antithesis, paradoxes, oxymorons)
imagery
metre (rhythm): iambic pentameter/iambic tetrameter
rhyme schemes: rhyming couplets (AABBCC), alternate rhyme (ABABCDCD)
colloquial language (slang, idioms et cetera)
Starter
What is meant by 'poetic methods'? With your shoulder partner, list as many methods as you can.
Language
Structure
Parent/child Relationships
Relate to question
Themes
Tone
Language
Form
N: alternate rhyme.
H: the mortality of parents.
H: sombre.
H: internal rhyme (line 24).
N: parents can't protect kids from life.
N: angry and pained.
H: organ extended metaphor.
N: military extended metaphor.
N: dad tries to protect son from nettles.
H: dad helping a son carry an organ.
Remember to:
Respond to the text
Analysis specific detail
Evaluate the writer’s uses of language and/or structure to create effects on readers
Explore ideas/themes/relationships
Compare ideas/themes/language/structure
Compare details
Task
How they relate to the question.
Structure
Themes
Language
Tone
presentation of relationships (romantic, familial)
feelings/strong emotions
opening lines/last lines
how language/structure is used
female/male speakers
unhappy experiences
Feelings About Reading in 'Slow Reader'
'Slow Reader
What's the poem about?
Themes
Tone
Language
Form and Structure
After we've discussed the poem, try writing your response. Follow this structure:
What's it about? What are the feelings? (Analyse, don't describe)
What ideas/themes/attitudes are presented?
What language methods does it use to express these? Evaluate how effective these are.
What do you notice about the structure?
You Try
Top Tips
Struggle with structure? Don't worry, just write about language.
Haven't answered the questions? Don't worry, they'll still mark it.
Used the 'wrong' poem? Don't worry, they still mark it.
Don't describe... analyse! Pick details and try to offer different interpretations.
Evaluate how effective details are.
In Section A, compare in every paragraph.
Starter
What is meant by 'poetic methods'? With your shoulder partner, list as many methods as you can.
While we're waiting...
Difficult Relationships: ‘Quickdraw’ and ‘Sister Maude’
Both poems present difficult relationships through the language. For example, in ‘Quickdraw’ the speaker seems to be fighting with her lover: ‘I twirl the phone,/then squeeze the trigger of my tongue’. The alliteration of the harsh ‘t’ sound emphasises how she wants to hurt him with her words. However, the verb ‘twirl’ is almost playful and suggests that the speaker feels that this next verbal ‘shot’ is going to hit the 'mark.’ Moreover, the verb ‘squeeze’ reflects her mixed emotions; perhaps she’d like to give him a squeeze (his throat perhaps?); romantic relationships often contain such conflicting and contrasting emotions. Similarly, the speaker in ‘Sister Maude doesn’t get on with her sister: ‘my sister Maude,/Who lurked to spy and peer.’ Here the verbs also suggest how the speaker feels about her sister; ‘lurked’, ‘spy’ and ‘peer’ all show just how much she blames her sister for the loss of her lover. These verbs make the sister seems devious, jealous and spitefully sneaky. The sound of ‘lurked’ is especially negative; the ‘urk’ is almost like the speaker feels physically sick when thinking of her treacherous sister. Both poets use these verbs and sounds to emphasise the difficulties in the relationships.
He can make sculptures
and fabulous machines,
invent games, tell jokes,
give solemn, adult advice –
but he is slow to read.
When I take him on my knee
with his Ladybird book
he gazes into the air,
sighing and shaking his head
like an old man
who knows the mountains
are impassable.
He toys with words,
letting them go cold
as gristly meat,
until I relent
and let him wriggle free:
a fish returning
to its element,
or a white-eyed colt – shying
from the bit *– who sees
that if he takes it
in his mouth
he’ll never run
quite free again.
Unit One exam: 9.15, 3rd June, sports hall.
Pre-exam practice P1-3 in C Block.
Extra practice P4-5.
22nd May
While we're waiting...
Difficult Relationships: ‘Quickdraw’ and ‘Sister Maude’
Both poems
present
difficult relationships
through the language. For example, in ‘Quickdraw’
the speaker seems to be fighting with her lover
:
‘I twirl the phone,/then squeeze the trigger of my tongue’.
The
alliteration
of the

harsh


t
’ sound

emphasises how she wants to hurt him with her words. However, the
verb

twirl
’ is
almost playful
and suggests that the speaker feels that this next verbal ‘shot’ is going to hit the
'
mark
.’ Moreover, the
verb

‘squeeze’

reflects her mixed emotions; perhaps she’d like to give him a squeeze (his throat perhaps?)
;
romantic relationships often contain such conflicting and contrasting emotions
.
Similarly,

the speaker in ‘Sister Maude doesn’t get on with her sister
:

‘my sister Maude,/Who lurked to spy and peer.’
Here the
verbs
also
suggest how the speaker feels about her sister
;
‘lurked’, ‘spy’ and ‘peer’
all
show just how much she blames her sister for the loss of her lover.
These
verbs

make the sister seems devious, jealous and spitefully sneaky.

The
sound
of
‘lurked’
is
especially

negative
; the
‘urk’
is
almost like the speaker feels physically sick when thinking of her treacherous sister
.

Both poets
use these
verbs and sounds
to emphasise the
difficulties in the relationships
.
Literature Exams

27th May: Poetry Across Time:
Section A: 'Moon On The Tides'
Section B: the unseen poem
Contemporary
'The Manhunt' by Simon Armitage
'Hour' by Carol Ann Duffy
'In Paris With You' by James Fenton
'Quickdraw' by Carol Ann Duffy
'Ghazal' by Mimi Khalvati
'Brothers' by Andrew Forster
'Praise Song for My Mother' by Grace Nichols
'Harmonium' by Simon Armitage
Heritage
'Sonnet 116 by William Shakespeare
Sonnet 43 by Elizabeth Barrett Browning
'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell
'The Farmer's Bride' by Charlotte Mew
'Sister Maude' by Christina Rossetti
'Nettles' by Vernon Scannell
'Born Yesterday' by Phillip Larkin
How many of the 'relationships' poems have you studied?
Mini Mock
Here are the AOs for this section. Remember to:
Respond to the text
Analysis specific detail
Evaluate the writer’s uses of language and/or structure to create effects on readers
Explore ideas/themes/relationships
Compare ideas/themes/language/structure
Compare details
Full transcript