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The Psychoanalytic Approach

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by

Katrina Sorgon

on 26 November 2013

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Transcript of The Psychoanalytic Approach

FREUDIAN THEORY OF PERSONALITY
Topographic Model
Free Association
A significant step in the development of Freud's Theory.
The Psychoanalytic Approach
Conscious
Contains the thoughts you are currently aware of.
FREUD DISCOVERS THE UNCONSCIOUS
He discovered that even without hypnosis, under the right circumstances patients would describe previously hidden material that is related to the cause and cure of hysterical symptoms.
Patient's memories usually concerned traumatic sexual experiences.
Usually occurred in early childhood.
ID
Selfish part of you
concerned only with satisfying your personal desires
based on
Pleasure Principle
Ego
Based on
reality principle
Satisfies ID impulses
Superego
Represents society's and in particular, the parent's values and standards.
Restrictions to what we can and we cannot do.
Often called
Conscience
Structural Model
Unconscious
Vast majority of thoughts and the
most important from a psychoanalytic
viewpoint.
Libido
The life or sexual instinct
Thanatos
Death or aggressive instinct
Defense Mechanism
Deals with unwanted
thoughts and desires
Repression
"The cornerstone on which the whole structure of psychoanalysis rests"
An active effort of ego to push threatening material our of consciousness or to keep such material from ever reaching consciousness.
Sublimation
Ego channels threatening unconscious impulses into socially acceptable actions.
Drains the ability to function: the more we use sublimation, the more productive we become.
The only successful defense mechanism
Displacement
Involves channeling our impulses to nonthreatening objects.
Many of our apparently irrational fears, or phobias, are merely
symbolic displacements.
Denial
Refuse to accept that certain facts exists.
Insisting something is not true despite all evidences.
Reaction Formation
Hiding from a threatening unconscious idea or urge by acting in a manner opposite to our unconscious desires.
Intellectualization
Considering something in a strictly intellectual, unemotional manner, we can bring previously difficult thoughts into consciousness without anxiety.
Projection
Freeing ourselves from the perception that we are the one who actually holds this thought.
Psychosexual Stages
of Development

Chief characteristic of each stage is the primary erogenous zone, and because each stage has a specific influence on a personality.
Fixation
The tying up of psychic
energy.

Stages
Oral Stage
First stage, which spans approximately the first 18 months of life, the moth, lips and tongue are the primary erogenous zones: source of pleasure
Anal Stage
When children reaches the age of about 18 months.
Most important erogenous zone during this period.
Time when most of the children are toilet trained.
Phallic Stage
Approximately ages 3-6
Penis and Clitoris becomes the most important erogenous zone.
Key development to phallic stage comes toward the end of the period when the child experiences
Oedipus Complex.
Children this age develop a sexual attraction to opposite-sex parent.
Preconscious
Large body of retrievable information.
Full transcript