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A Death and a Deadly Decision

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Anna Schlueter

on 8 April 2013

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Transcript of A Death and a Deadly Decision

Eve's Apology in Defense
of Women To An Athlete
Dying Young By A.E. Housman Works Cited Academy of American Poets. "A. E. Housman." - Poets.org. Academy of America Poets, n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2013. Sullivan, Dick. "A. E. Housman: A Life in Brief." A. E. Housman: A Life in Brief. Victorian Web, 19 July 2006. Web. 19 Mar. 2013. To an Athlete Dying Young The time you won your town the race
We chaired you through the market-place;
Man and boy stood cheering by,
And home we brought you shoulder-high.

To-day, the road all runners come,
Shoulder-high we bring you home,
And set you at your threshold down,
Townsman of a stiller town.

Smart lad, to slip betimes away
From fields were glory does not stay
And early though the laurel grows
It withers quicker than the rose.

Eyes the shady night has shut
Cannot see the record cut,
And silence sounds no worse than cheers
After earth has stopped the ears:

Now you will not swell the rout
Of lads that wore their honours out,
Runners whom renown outran
And the name died before the man.

So set, before its echoes fade,
The fleet foot on the sill of shade,
And hold to the low lintel up
The still-defended challenge-cup.

And round that early-laurelled head
Will flock to gaze the strengthless dead,
And find unwithered on its curls
The garland briefer than a girl's. A. E. Housman Alfred Edward Housman was born in Fockbury, Worcestershire, England, on March 26, 1859. He was the first born of 7 children, and on his twelfth birthday, his mother died. At 18, he went to St John's College, Oxford. It is likely he might have known Oscar Wilde, since he was at there at the same time. While there, Housman Housman developed a "passionate attachment" to his heterosexual roommate, Moses Jackson. Moses Jackson was not flattered by Housman's poems or attention. They shared lodging for 18 months, until Jackson left England to accept a headmastership in India. He returned home only to marry. Housman was not informed of the ceremony until Jackson and his wife returned to England. Housman and Jackson rarely saw each other again. By Aemilia Lanyer This rejection deeply hurt Housman and he remained lonely for the rest of his life. This incident set the tone of his life, and his poems. In 1892 he was appointed professor of Latin at University College, London because of his indepth study of Roman and Greek classics. After the death of his friend, Adalbert Jackson in 1896, he published "A Shropshire Lad", a book of 63 poems speaking of loss and loneliness, young soldiers, ale, and being hung by the neck until dead. In 1911 he became professor of Latin at Trinity College, where he stayed for the rest of his life. In August of 1914, World War I broke out. His previously published book of poetry became famous because of its depiction of youth cut off in its prime.
In 1920, Moses Jackson died, and inspired his other book of poetry, Last Poems. He remained at Trinity College, and was known as a recluse and the professor that refused to learn young women's names. He remained alone and died in 1936. The time you won your town the race
We chaired you through the market-place;
Man and boy stood cheering by,
And home we brought you shoulder-high.

To-day, the road all runners come,
Shoulder-high we bring you home,
And set you at your threshold down,
Townsman of a stiller town. Stanzas One - Three I
m
a
g
e
r
y Parallel
Structure Euphemism In stanzas one, two and three, A.E. Housman makes use of Parallel Structure, Juxtaposition, Imagery, Euphemism and Symbolism. He uses AABB, CCDD, EEFF rhyme scheme and an easily read and understood iambic pentameter.
All three stanzas make use of Imagery. The descriptive language of Imagery makes the theme of fleetfooted fame come to life. The parallel structure of the images contrasts the youth and death of the athlete. By using Parallel structure, the juxtaposition is clearly seen. The celebration of his victory grates against the Euphemism for death and the end of the Athlete's life. The glory of the race is quickly forgotten and replaced with the sorrow of death. Juxtaposition Euphemism Metonymy Alliteration Metaphor Smart lad, to slip betimes away
From fields were glory does not stay
And early though the laurel grows
It withers quicker than the rose. Symbolism Eyes the shady night has shut
Cannot see the record cut,
And silence sounds no worse than cheers
After earth has stopped the ears:

Now you will not swell the rout
Of lads that wore their honours out,
Runners whom renown outran
And the name died before the man.

So set, before its echoes fade,
The fleet foot on the sill of shade,
And hold to the low lintel up
The still-defended challenge-cup.

And round that early-laurelled head
Will flock to gaze the strengthless dead,
And find unwithered on its curls
The garland briefer than a girl's. Personification Personification Alliteration Alliteration Symbolism Repetition Symbolism Symbolism Many of A.E. Housman's techniques are repeated multiple times in order to create a feeling of unity, despite the dissimilar settings and sudden shifts. The personification of death is very prevalent in the poem, as is the use of symbolism of young death. He makes use of repetition to enforce his imagery, and uses breathy alliteration of "f" and "c" to make the words flow together. Renown is personified as a racer who can outrun any famous athlete. Personification She became pregnant at 22, and was paid to marry Alphonso Lanyer, the Queen's musician, and hay mover. He was paid six pence for every load of hay and three pence for every load of straw brought into London and Westminster. This sudden drop in income frustrated Aemlia, and she may have taken up her old job. Some scholars have claimed she is the "dark lady" of Shakespeare. In her spare time, she took to writing poetry. Her only book of poems, Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum (Hail, God, King of the Jews) was published in 1611, when she was 42. Her poems were controversial because she was a woman and because of the religious nature of the poem. In 1613, her husband died and she established a school in her house. However, she was arrested twice in front of her students for refusing to pay rent. Her financial struggle continued until her death in 1645. Eve's Apology in Defense of Women
But surely Adam can not be excused,
Her fault though great, yet he was most to blame;
What Weakness offered, Strength might have refused,
Being Lord of all, the greater was his shame:
Although the Serpent's craft had her abused,
God's holy word ought all his actions frame,
For he was Lord and King of all the earth,
Before poore Eve had either life or breath.

Who being framed by God's eternal hand,
The perfectest man that ever breathed on earth;
And from God's mouth received that straight command,
The breach whereof he knew was present death:
Yea having power to rule both Sea and Land,
Yet with one Apple won to loose that breat
Which God had breathed in his beauteous face,
Bringing us all in danger and disgrace.

And then to lay the fault on Patience' back,
That we (poor women) must endure it all;
We know right well he did discretion lack,
Being not persuaded thereunto at all;
If Eve did err, it was for knowledge' sake,
The fruit being fair persuaded him to fall:
No subtle Serpent's falsehood did betray him,
If he would eat it, who had power to stay him?

Not Eve, whose fault was only too much love,
Which made her give this present to her Dear,
That what she tasted,
he likewise might prove,
Whereby his knowledge might become more clear;
He never sought her weakeness to reprove,
With those sharp words, which he of God did hear:
Yet Men will boast of Knowledge, which he took
From Eve's fair hand, as from a learned Book. Mcbride, Kari B. "Aemilia Lanyer, 17th-C English Woman Poet: Biography." Aemilia Lanyer, 17th-C English Woman Poet: Biography. University of Arizona, n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2013. "Aemilia Lanyer, Biographical Introduction." Aemilia Lanyer, Biographical Introduction. University of Saskatchewan, 8 June 1988. Web. 21 Mar. 2013. But surely Adam can not be excused,
Her fault though great, yet he was most to blame;
What Weakness offered, Strength might have refused,
Being Lord of all, the greater was his shame:
Although the Serpent's craft had her abused,
God's holy word ought all his actions frame,
For he was Lord and King of all the earth,
Before poore Eve had either life or breath.

Who being framed by God's eternal hand,
The perfectest man that ever breathed on earth;
And from God's mouth received that straight command,
The breach whereof he knew was present death:
Yea having power to rule both Sea and Land,
Yet with one Apple won to loose that breath
Which God had breathed in his beauteous face,
Bringing us all in danger and disgrace. Personification Metonomy And then to lay the fault on Patience' back,
That we (poor women) must endure it all;
We know right well he did discretion lack,
Being not persuaded thereunto at all;
If Eve did err, it was for knowledge' sake,
The fruit being fair persuaded him to fall:
No subtle Serpent's falsehood did betray him,
If he would eat it, who had power to stay him?

Not Eve, whose fault was only too much love,
Which made her give this present to her Dear,
That what she tasted, he likewise might prove, Whereby his knowledge might become more clear;
He never sought her weakness to reprove,
With those sharp words, which he of God did hear:
Yet Men will boast of Knowledge, which he took From Eve's fair hand, as from a learned Book. Personification Shift Alliteration Alliteration Alliteration Shift Simile Alliteration Alliteration In describing the fate of Adam and Eve, Lanyer personifies their characteristics by using Metonymy to identify them. She also uses a Rhyming couplet at the end of all her stanzas. The entire passage features ABABABCC rhyme scheme, creating a steady rhythm predictable sentence structure. However, at the time this poem was published, a regular rhyme scheme was expected.
In the next stanza, she uses Metonymy and Alliteration. She says Adam was given control over both Sea and Land. In this case, the Sea and Land are representatives of themselves, and of all the animals and plants found in and on them. To expound on Adam's power, Lanyer uses alliteration to enunciate her imagery of the fall of man. Metonomy Slant Rhyme Im
ag
er
y This stanza makes use of a FGFGFGHH, IJIJIJKK rhyme scheme and Iambic Pentameter. The first stanza shifts from addressing Adam's mistake to Adam's accusation of Eve. Lanyer personifies Patience in describing women, who, according to Lanyer who have been the bearer of undeserved blame. She also uses alliteration multiple times, repeating e and f sounds when discussing the ferocious fall and Eve's error, and the suspicious s sound when
describing the Satan as a serpent.

The following, and last stanza, she shifts and reaches the climax of the logical argument. Lanyer's defense is complete with a final simile. She describes the pride men take in knowledge, while they forget they took it directly out of Eve's hand, as easily as they could a book. Theme: Fame is Fleet footed. Though Housman's runner was young and popular, death still caught up to him. Thematically, the poem reflects a very clear picture that Fame is fleet footed, most obviously in the line, "Smart lad, to slip betimes away from fields where glory does not stay." Housman compliment's the boy's wisdom in his early departure. He continues praising the boy's plan in Stanza 5, when he says "Now you will not swell the rout Of lads that wore their honours out, Runners who renown out ran and the name died before the man." Housman makes the theme clear when he picked the language for his description of an Athlete dying young. Theme: In defense of women, Eve is not as guilty as men say. Despite the tremendously different backgrounds of the two poets, they both were masters of their trade. A.E. Hausman used runner beat by death to describe the fleeting footedness of fame, and Aemilia Lanyer used logic and literary techniques to provide a different look on the oldest story ever told. While the stories are dramatically different, both are dark, describing death and downfall. In "To an Athlete Dying Young", A.E. Housman uses the imagery of death of a runner to warn the living not to depend on glory and fame. In Aemilia Lanyer's "Eve's Apology in Defense of Women", she uses a number of literary devices, paired with logic to retell an age old tale. Stanzas 5-7 Analysis of 5-7 Analysis of 1-3 Stanzas 1-2 Analysis of Stanzas 1-2 Stanzas 3-4 Analysis of Stanza 3-4 Yanko, Richard J. "To an Athlete Dying Young, by A. E. Housman." To an Athlete Dying Young, by A. E. Housman. Richard J. Yanko, 11 Nov. 1998. Web. 22 Mar. 2013. Youngs, Charles. "Eve's Apology in Defense of Women." Eve's Apology in Defense of Women. Charles Youngs, 21 Jan. 2013. Web. 22 Mar. 2013. While Aemilia Lanyer's poem features an entire logical argument, she still used literary devices.
she uses alliteration, personification, metonymy and many more to prove that Eve is not as guilty as we all learned. A Death and a Decision Amelia Lanyer was Christened on January 27, 1587. Most of the information known about her is found in the record books from the astrologer Simon Forman in his failed attempts to seduce her. Because of this, most information we have on her is negative. Amelia mastered friend-zoning Forman, and eventually, he grew sick of her rejection. Her affairs, miscarriages and physical faults are all overexagerated in his notes. She was the mistress of Henry Carey, Lord Hunsdon who was forty-five years her senior for the sum for the income of 40 pounds a year.
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